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Dr. Julianne Malveaux Archives - Page 3 of 19 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Embracing Youth Leadership

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Congressman John Robert Lewis was just 17 when he reached out to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with a letter conveying his desire to attend all-white Troy State College (now Troy State University) that was just ten miles from his home. Lewis submitted an application but never heard from the college, and hoped King would help. Instead, he went to Fisk University. Later, Dr. King…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Adding Fuel to the Fire of Our Pandemics

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Nero, the Roman Emperor who legendarily fiddled while Rome burned is a symbol for an irresponsible, ineffective, and callous leader who shows indifference to people in crisis.  The great Rome fire took place in the first century AD.  The fiddle wasn’t invented until the eleventh century, so it is unlikely that the hedonistic emperor played the fiddle while his city was burning.  More likely, he…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

The Enemy Within

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — At least six Black children were killed during the Fourth of You Lie weekend.  They weren’t doing anything wrong, just attending a community picnic, or going to visit a grandmother, or riding in a car with her mom.  One of the children, Secoriea Turner, 8, was an Atlantan, and the day after the killing, Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, emotionally addressed the killers, “You shot and…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Symbols, Statues, and Substance

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — Socially isolated and alone in my home, I lifted my fist into the air when I learned that the Mississippi legislature voted to remove the Confederate stars and bars from their flag. As NACCP President Derrick Jackson said, “it’s been a long time coming.”  A long time since the songstress Nina Simone put it out there with Mississippi G—damn. A long time since Emmitt Till was…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

No Economic Victory Lap

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — The June Employment Situation report, released on July 2, showed a continued decline in the unemployment rate.  Thanks to coronavirus, the rate shot up to 14.7 percent in April and declined to 11.1 percent in June.  About 4.8 million more people were on payrolls in June than in May.  Just about every sector of the economy saw job gains, including the troubled leisure snd hospitality…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Looters, Lowlifes, and Liars

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — According to the Washington Post, the 45th President told 19,126 lies between his inauguration in 2017 and June 1, 2020.  By now, the number has likely edged toward 20,000, as his Tulsa “rally” yielded dozens more.  This President has no allegiance to the truth, but that’s no surprise.  Leading up to his ill-timed gathering, amid the coronavirus, he projected more than a million attendees.  Instead,…

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Injured and wounded prisoners are taken to hospital under guard after the Tulsa, Oklahoma race riots in 1921 when up to 300 African-Americans were massacred by white mobs

Anniversary of Tulsa race massacre revives calls for reparations

By Reparations

Demand for justice grows nearly 100 years after racist mob destroyed a black neighbourhood with impunity. By Alex Woodward, Independent — On 31 May, 1921, white mobs staged a two-day massacre of a thriving black town in Oklahoma, mounting one of the bloodiest episodes of racist violence in US history. After a black man in Tulsa was accused of assaulting a white woman, an armed mob supported by law enforcement and city officials…

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Andrea Harris

Andrea Harris and the Fight for Minority Business

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux —  Andrea Harris was not well-known, but she should have been.  She was the co-founder of the North Carolina Institute of  Minority Business Development, an advocate for social and economic justice, a champion for historically Black colleges and universities, and a Bennett Belle (Class of 1970) who passionately loved her college.  After a brief illness and a stroke, she made her transition on May 20.  The…

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The Tulsa Massacre and Destruction of Black Wall Street: The Case for Reparations and HR 40

By Events, NAARC Posts, News & Current Affairs, Reparations

Sunday, May 31, 2020  — The National African Reparations Commission (NAARC), American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and Human Rights Watch (HRW) hosted a virtual forum with leaders from around the country to discuss one of the most important issues critical to the pursuit of racial justice in America. Many Americans learned about the Tulsa massacre when it was dramatized on the HBO superhero series Watchmen. To the people who lost…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

What About the Children?

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Do you see the light at the end of the coronavirus tunnel? With all 50 states and the District of Columbia) either lifting “shelter in place” orders or relaxing them, with restaurants opening, albeit at half capacity, things seem to be slowly returning to “normal” whatever that is.  Many of us are still “social distancing,” as defined by the Centers for Disease Control as staying…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Old, Sick and Incarcerated

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — There were 4623 incarcerated people over 65 in federal prisons during the first week of May. Until May 12, Paul Manafort, Mr. Trump’s one-time campaign manager, was one of them. The 71-year-old petitioned the court for release to home confinement because of his age, heart condition, and “fear of coronavirus.” Yet the federal correctional institution that housed Manafort had no coronavirus cases, and Manafort had…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Ida B’s Pulitzer — Both Too Late and Right on Time

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Exactly one hundred and thirty-six years to the day after Ida B. Wells was thrown off a Chesapeake and Ohio railroad train, she was awarded a Pulitzer Prize special citation for her “outstanding and courageous reporting on the horrific and vicious violence against African Americans in the era of lynchings.”  The creator of the New York Times’ 1619 Project, Nicole Hannah-Jones, received a Pulitzer on the…

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