David R. Jones, Community Service Society of New York

Rezoning rich and poor neighborhoods are two different things

By News & Current Affairs

By David R. Jones, The Urban Agenda — Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to rezone 15 New York City neighborhoods in order to fuel new housing development has hit a rough patch, and people are blaming anti-development feelings. De Blasio kicked off his first term as mayor with a plan to expand the city’s stock of both affordable and market housing, largely through rezonings to allow denser residential development. Now,…

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Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass Railed Against Economic Inequality

By Editors' Choice

The great abolitionist and former slave Frederick Douglass died 125 years ago. Jacobin published never-before-transcribed articles from Frederick Douglass’ Paper denouncing capitalism and economic inequality. By Matt Karp  — Everyone knows that Frederick Douglass, who died 125 years ago today, was a fierce opponent of slavery and a powerful champion of freedom, justice, and equality for all. But when it comes to Douglass’s concrete political views, things are more complicated. For…

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Black Power Movement / Civil Rights Movement

How the Black Power Movement Influenced the Civil Rights Movement

By Editors' Choice

With a focus on racial pride and self-determination, the Black Power movement argued that civil rights reforms did not go far enough to end discrimination against African Americans. By Sarah Pruitt, History — By 1966, the civil rights movement had been gaining momentum for more than a decade, as thousands of African Americans embraced a strategy of nonviolent protest against racial segregation and demanded equal rights under the law. But for an…

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"Plight of the People" Illustration by Brian Washington.

Don’t pit slavery descendants against black immigrants. Racism doesn’t know the difference.

By Editors' Choice

An anti-African, anti-black-immigrant stance is shortsighted. As we celebrate Black History Month, we should not divide the black community. By Kevin Cokley, USA Today — Should African American/black identity be defined by descendants of slavery, or by African ancestry? This increasingly bitter debate in the black community is undermining the spirit of Black History Month. At the center of the conflict is the social movement referred to as ADOS, or the American…

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Incoming AU Pres. C. Ramaphosa (l) and outgoing Pres. A. Ahmed

At African Union Summit, Ramaphosa Announces End of Colonialism

By News & Current Affairs

By Global Information Network — A stirring call to action was delivered this week in the august hall of the African Union headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, spoken by the incoming AU president Cyril Ramaphosa to distinguished members of the continental body representing over 40 countries. In his presentation at the AU’s 33rd summit, the South African President wove history with commentary into a tapestry of hope for a continent…

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Booker T Washington

Bookerism and the Black Elite

By Editors' Choice

Managing race relations from above. By Adolph Reed Jr., The New Republic — On September 18, 1895, Booker T. Washington gave his famous address to the Atlanta Cotton States and International Exposition. Washington declared before this regional business gathering his acquiescence in the name of the black Southern population to the new regime of almost total black disfranchisement and the abrogation of civil rights within a social, political, and economic…

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First slave auction in New Amsterdam.

The 1619 Project Debate with History of Slavery in New York City

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

By Alan Singer, HNN — Author’s note: “Represent NYC” is a weekly program produced by Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN). The show’s guests usually discuss topics like affordable housing, education policy and domestic violence. I was invited to discuss the New York Times’ 1619 Project and the long-term impact of slavery on New York and American society for a Black History Month broadcast. This post includes the questions I prepared to answer and notes…

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How the term “ADOS” buys into eugenics and anti-blackness

By Reparations, Video/Audio

“Culture, Class, and Consciousness” Host Jen Marie Pollard interviews J.A.M. Aiwuyor. Also See Understanding ADOS: The Movement to Hijack Black Identity and Weaken Black Unity By Jessica Ann Mitchell Aiwuyor — The term “American Descendants of Slavery” (ADOS) was created in 2016 to describe and distinctly separate Black Americans/African Americans from Black immigrant communities (Africans, Afro-Caribbeans, Afro-Latinos, etc). The movement claims to advocate for reparations on behalf of Black Americans….

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Kara Walker: What Do We Want History to Do to Us?

Kara Walker: What Do We Want History to Do to Us?

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Zadie Smith, NYREV — This essay appears in somewhat different form in the catalog of “Kara Walker: Hyundai Commission,” an exhibition at Tate Modern, London, October 2, 2019–April 5, 2020; the catalog is edited by Clara Kim and published by Tate Publishing. *** Two women are bound at the waist, tied to each other. One is a slim, white woman, in antebellum underskirt and corset. A Scarlett O’Hara type.…

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The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Reverend Justin Welby, addresses the General Synod at Church House in London.

Church of England to apologize for being ‘deeply institutionally racist’

By News & Current Affairs

By Ivana Kottasová, CNN — The Church of England has decided to apologize for racism experienced by “countless black, Asian and minority ethnic people” over the past 70 years. The Church said in a statement that the General Synod, its legislative body, voted on last Tuesday to issue an official apology and commission an outside expert to prepare a report on racism, race and ethnicity in the church. Speaking at the synod,…

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