Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

The Government Shutdown and the Collateral Damage

By | Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — As I write this, our federal government has been shut down for 27 days.  At first, it seemed like a gamesmanship joke, like who was going to blink first.  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and (CA) Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (NY) didn’t look like they were blinking when 45 said he would “own” the shutdown to get his wall.  He’s not owning it now – he…

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Mumia Abu-Jamal

“Organize, organize, organize,” said Mumia Abu-Jam al

By | Editors' Choice

By Herb Boyd and Autodidact 17 — There was an overflow crowd of supporters Saturday afternoon at the People’s Forum near Penn Station to hear a panel of speakers on an update on the condition of political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal.  Many were surprised to learn that Abu-Jamal, who has been behind bars since 1981, would be addressing them via telephone. Spectators were hardly in their seats when Mumia’s rich, sonorous…

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Cashing in on King - MLK Day Sales

Cashing in on King

By | Commentaries/Opinions

Get your credit card and check books ready for this year’s King Holiday. By Earl Ofari Hutchinson — Here’s what The Gap Clothing retailer blazoned in an ad, “Over 500 styles MLK Event Huge Savings! Up to 50% off on items.” Macy’s quickly joined in and announced its MLK Day sale noting “20 percent off sitewide with free shipping on qualifying orders. Further details are expected to be announced over the weekend.”…

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Lavinia Baker and her five surviving children after the lynching of her husband and baby on Feb. 22, 1898.

Post office to be named for black postmaster who was lynched in 1898

By | News & Current Affairs

Frazier B. Baker was the first black postmaster in Lake City, South Carolina. By Associated Press — LAKE CITY, S.C. — A South Carolina town’s post office will be named in honor of its first black postmaster, Frazier B. Baker, who was lynched in 1898 after he refused to resign. U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., introduced a bill to rename the office after Baker, saying it would ensure that his…

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"Undesign the Redline," an exhibit the history of redlining and other discriminatory housing policies in New Orleans and nationwide, is on view at Tulane University's Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design through March 1, 2019.

How did a long past of racist housing policy shape New Orleans? New exhibit explores

By | News & Current Affairs

By Jennifer Larino, The Times Picayune — What can we do to break New Orleans and its neighborhoods free from a long history of racist housing policies? That’s the question posed by “Undesign the Redline,” a traveling exhibit currently stopped at Tulane University’s Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design in Central City. A localized version of the exhibit was created by Designing the WE, a New York design firm…

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Patrice Lumumba

Patrice Lumumba’s Letter to his wife before his death on January 17, 1961

By | Editors' Choice

Patrice Lumumba (July 2, 1925 – January 17, 1961) Lest We forget: The last letter written by Patrice Lumumba to his wife, Pauline, just before his death on January 17, 1961…   “My beloved companion, I write you these words not knowing whether you will receive them, when you will receive them, and whether I will still be alive when you read them. Throughout my struggle for the independence of…

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