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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Raising the Million Man March: Remembering and reaffirming its mission

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — It was 26 years ago, October 16, 1995, that we stood firmly together, 2 million plus strong in Washington, D.C. Called to action by Min. Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam and the critical juncture and demands of our history, we declared our commitment to assume a new and expanded responsibility in life, love and struggle. Below follows an excerpt from the Million Man March/Day…

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John Henrik Clarke

The Impact of Marcus Garvey by Dr. John Henrik Clarke

By Commentaries/Opinions

When Marcus Garvey died in 1940 the role of the British Empire was already being challenged by India and the rising expectations of her African colonies. Marcus Garvey’s avocation of African redemption and the restoration of the African state’s sovereign political entity in world affairs was still a dream without fulfillment. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, the United States would enter, in a formal way, what…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Labor shortage or pay shortfall?

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Walking down a busy urban street, one cannot help but notice the number of “help wanted” signs that grace the front of many establishments. Restaurants, grocery stores, and retail establishments all seem to want workers. Many of them indicate their starting pay is “at least” $15 an hour. Some list other benefits in the window, including things like vacation time, employee discounts, and more. Workers…

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Rev. Jesse Jackson

Rev. Jesse L. Jackson: A Living Legend & Icon

By Commentaries/Opinions

By TBT News — The Reverend Jesse L. Jackson reaches a hallmark this past Friday, October 8, when he turns 80 years old. He is the most senior Black civil rights leader to live. Frederick Douglas died at 78, Marcus Garvey died at 53, and Booker T. Washington died at 59. The modern leaders Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, and Malcolm X were both assassinated at 39. And since we do not have civil rights leaders to live long lives, we don’t…

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Protesters marched in an Indigenous Peoples Day rally in Boston on Oct. 10, 2020, as part of a demonstration to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples' Day. Boston made that change last week.

Goodbye, Columbus? Here’s what Indigenous Peoples’ Day means to Native Americans

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Emma Bowman, NPR — This year marks the first time a U.S. president has officially recognized Indigenous Peoples’ Day. President Biden issued a proclamation on Friday to observe this Oct. 11 as a day to honor Native Americans, their resilience and their contributions to American society throughout history, even as they faced assimilation, discrimination and genocide spanning generations. The move shifts focus from Columbus Day, the federal holiday celebrating Christopher Columbus,…

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Donald Trump supporters outside the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6, 2021

America is on the same roadmap we saw in Germany in the 1930s

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Chauncey DeVega, Salon — In a recent interview with MSNBC, former Republican strategist Steve Schmidt issued a stern warning to Americans who have not yet grasped the nature of our present crisis of democracy. “We have an autocratic movement teeming with violence and the intimations of violence in this country,” he said, inviting viewers of the liberal news channel to imagine “that domestic terrorist, that criminal who desecrated the American flag…

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Haitian Refugees

What America owes Haitian asylum seekers

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Michael Posner, NYT — Last month, the Biden administration announced that it had cleared a makeshift tent camp where thousands of Haitians had congregated under a bridge linking Mexico and Del Rio, Texas. They had arrived there desperate to gain admission to the United States, many fleeing persecution in Haiti and seeking the protection of our asylum law. The administration’s unsteady response to this crisis has revealed, once again, the broken…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Why Won’t Democrats Fight?

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Not a day goes by that I don’t get a text or three from the Democratic National Committee asking for contributions. Sometimes they come from Vice President Harris. Sometimes, from President Biden himself. Occasionally, from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi or DNC Chair Jaime Harrison Not to mention the texts that come from Congressional candidates all over the country, looking for $10, $17, or $27. I…

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Wind Turbines

Latin American and Caribbean finance ministries can turbocharge the transformation to green economies

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Huáscar Eguino, Raúl Delgado, and Aloisio Lopes — With the UN climate talks starting at the end of October and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s latest stark warning that the world has scant time to avoid climate catastrophe, the international community urgently needs to find ways to meet the challenge. To limit the increase in the global average temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius called for by the Paris Agreement, finance…

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Trump and the American Gentry

Trump and the American Gentry

By Commentaries/Opinions

The jet-setting cosmopolitans of popular imagination exist, but they are far outnumbered by a less exalted and less discussed elite group, one that sits at the pinnacle of America’s local hierarchies. By Patrick Wyman, The Atlantic — American wealth and power usually have a certain look: glass-walled penthouse apartments in glittering urban skyscrapers, sprawling country mansions, ivy-covered prep schools, vacation homes in the Hamptons. These are the outward symbols of…

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Uhuru Kenyatta

Rev up Africa-CARICOM cooperation

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Jamaica Gleaner — Africa and Caribbean leaders touched on many of the relevant issues during their virtual summit earlier this month. But given the urgency of many of the global developments with which they have to contend, the leaders were not sufficiently specific, and robust, about those on which they intend to develop joint initiatives. There was not the sense of urgency for which we had hoped. That, we…

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Melvin Van Peebles

Melvin Van Peebles, Creative Genius

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — One of the first Broadway plays I ever saw was Melvin Van Peeble’s Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death.  A. Robert Phillips, who led the Black Talent Program at Boston College, arranged for a group of us undergraduates to attend the play, have dinner, and enjoy New York City. I was riveted by the powerful play, a series of vignettes performed by a talented ensemble, who…

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