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Runoko Rashidi

Runoko Rashidi, intrepid scholar of the global African presence

By Commentaries/Opinions, News & Current Affairs

By Herb Boyd — There is an abundance of serious scholars in the African American canon, but few as intrepid, wide-ranging, and resourceful as Runoko Rashidi. When you have interviewed John G. Jackson, edited Ivan Van Sertima, and challenged the conclusions of Cheikh Anta Diop as Rashidi did, then your credentials are unquestionable. An obituary states that Rashidi passed on August 2, and yes he passed our way but his…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Rep. Cori Bush Is My Shero

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — Congresswoman Cori Bush (D-MO) was once homeless. She wrote movingly about sleeping with her babies in her car, with no place to go, nowhere to wash except a McDonald’s restroom, nowhere to exhale. She was homeless and working, and among a group that has coined the term “unhoused” to convey the pain of living without a home, belongings stuffed into garbage bags, hot food an elusive…

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A warehouse smolders in Durban, South Africa, after supporters of former President Jacob Zuma erupted in violence earlier this month when Zuma was jailed.

Mandela’s dream for South Africa is in ruins

By Commentaries/Opinions

Following the imprisonment of Jacob Zuma, and at a time when inequality is worse than during apartheid, mob violence is threatening the country’s constitutional order. By Robin Wright, The New Yorker — On June 16, 1976, thousands of Black South African children poured out of their classrooms to peacefully protest the government’s decision to forcibly teach them in Afrikaans, the language of Dutch settlers. As a young foreign correspondent, I covered the…

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U.S. Air Force

The forbidden word: Is this country heading for the exit?

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Thom Engelheart, TomDispatch — It was all so long ago, in a world seemingly without challengers. Do you even remember when we Americans lived on a planet with a recumbent Russia, a barely rising China, and no obvious foes except what later came to be known as an “axis of evil,” three countries then incapable of endangering this one? Oh, and, as it turned out, a rich young Saudi…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Ron Daniels

From Tragedy to Triumph: Toward A Government of National Inclusion/Unity in Haiti – A Way Forward

By Vantage Point Articles

An Essay by Dr. Ron Daniels President of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century and Founder of the Haiti Support Project Tragedy and triumph is a recurring theme in the history of Haiti, the world’s first Black Republic. It was a horrific tragedy that Africans were enslaved via the Europe slave trade and forcibly relocated to Ayiti to be the forced free labor for what would become the…

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March on Washington

The myth of class-reductionism

By Commentaries/Opinions

The fight for racial and gender justice has always been about economic inequality, too. By Adolph Reed Jr., New Republic — Ever since Bernie Sanders’s insurgent run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016, a specter has haunted left-liberal debate: the specter of “class reductionism.” Left-identitarians and centrist liberals have used this oversimplified charge not merely to dismiss Sanders but also to cast suspicion on the broad array of universally…

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“Battle of Ravine-à-Couleuvres,” by Karl Girardet and Jean-Jacques Outhwaite

We owe Haiti a debt we can’t repay

By Commentaries/Opinions

Haitians carried out the first and only successful slave revolt in modern history, then repelled Napoleon’s forces, making way for the Louisiana Purchase. By Annette Gordon-Reed, NYT — When assassins killed President Jovenel Moïse of Haiti on July 7, pushing the country to the brink of chaos, it may have struck many Americans as the latest in a string of political upheavals and destabilizing disasters in an unfortunate country with…

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Overturned police cars in the street in the wake of a demonstration against Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel in Havana, on July 11, 2021.

Cuba’s protests are different this time

By Commentaries/Opinions

A shrinking economy, frightening new rates of Covid infections, and growing discontent with the government are fueling once-in-a-generation protests. By William M. LeoGrande, The Nation — Never since the triumph of the Cuban revolution in 1959 have anti-government protesters mounted large, simultaneous demonstrations in cities across the island like they did last weekend. Some of the demonstrations were peaceful; others were little more than riots and an excuse for looting….

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Faith

How Far Is White Supremacy Embedded in Christianity?

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Peter Larmann — Robert P. Jones is CEO and founder of the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) and the author of two books, including last year’s much-discussed White Too Long: The Legacy of White Supremacy in Christian America, which just came out in paperback. PRRI recently released a huge new survey that made headlines and drew commentary by pointing to a sharp decline in the proportion of Americans who identify…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

The History and Future of Haiti

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

Revolution, Repression, Resistance and Eventual Victory By Dr. Maulana Karenga — The history and culture of Haiti is marked by extraordinary expressions of revolutionary struggle and victory, suffering and repression, but always righteous and relentless resistance of the people and their radical refusal to be defeated. The Haitian nation was born in revolutionary struggle, achieving what no enslaved people had done before or after. It defeated its enslavers and other…

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Armed National Guard and African American men standing on a sidewalk during the race riots in Chicago, Illinois, 1919.

GHOSTS TOO CLOSE: This week’s 1919 DC Race Rebellion and the tragic history of DC’s Lafayette Park

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Nkechi Taifa — Normally my morning walks don’t include going down Memory Lane, particularly one that has been invisible for almost a century. But there I was, in Lafayette Park one Saturday morning last month, right near Lafayette School and its adjoining Recreational Center in upper NW D.C., and Black history came to greet me. I saw a crowd and I saw a sign. So I did what anyone would…

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