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Commentaries/Opinions

Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota

Researching, Teaching, and Embodying the Black Diaspora: An Introduction

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Charisse Burden-Stelly and Crystal Moten, Black Perspectives — Part I: Studying the Black Diaspora, Then and Now From May 22-24, 2019, a group of scholars from liberal arts colleges throughout the country gathered at Carleton College for a workshop titled, “Teaching, Researching, and Embodying the Black Diaspora at Elite Liberal Arts Colleges.” Organized by Drs. Crystal Moten, Chipo Dendere, and Charisse Burden-Stelly, this workshop aimed to interrogate a host…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Focusing on Freedom with Harriet Tubman: Enduring Advice on Relentless Resistance

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — This is a reminder, prelude and promise of a coming review on the movie “Harriet”. This is in joyful and grateful homage to our illustrious foremother, Harriet Tubman, the liberator. We offer sacred words and water to this leader and liberator, this all-seasons soldier, abolitionist, freedom fighter, strategist, teacher, nurse, advocate of human, civil and women’s rights, and this family woman: daughter of her parents…

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Kasi Lemmons’s “Harriet” - Harriet Tubman Movie.

The Stunning Achievement of Kasi Lemmons’s “Harriet”

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Richard Brody, The New Yorker — A common failure of movies, especially historical ones, is that they don’t open their drama to intellectual context or to the inner lives of their characters. Kasi Lemmons’s “Harriet” is a bold and accomplished exception: this bio-pic of Harriet Tubman develops her actions as a freer of enslaved people with ardent and detailed attention to the prophetic visions that impel her, and the…

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The Enduring Battle to Diversify Historical Reenactment

The Enduring Battle to Diversify Historical Reenactment

By Commentaries/Opinions

White history is still normalized. Non-white history is seen as provocative. By Nick Martin, The New Republic –  Imagine, for a moment, you’re about eight years old, standing in a valley strewn with tiny hills. Your mother is nearby, trying to rope in your wandering little brother. Towering over you and milling about are dozens of older white men, silver in the beard and haggard in the face, antique rifles…

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Earl Ofari Hutchinson

McConnell’s African American Victory Sounds Another Warning Bell

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson, The Hutchinson Report — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell gave one of the biggest hugs I ever saw to a political candidate. There was good reason for it. His hand-picked choice for Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron just won big in that state’s election. Cameron is the first African American to hold statewide office in Kentucky in decades. He is a staunch protégé of McConnell. Both…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Let’s Suspend the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Program

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Even as our legislators grapple with impeachment, they are also charged to pass a dozen budget bills, including a bill on “defense”. Recent elections suggest a paradigm shift in the way we view budget spending, what with Democrats taking charge in both Virginia and Kentucky (I’m not counting Mississippi, Dems aren’t likely to capture that one until lightening strikes). Some are suggesting that the government…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Trump’s America By Dawn’s Early Light: Notes on Lynching, Lying and Seeking Justice

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — Pushing back the thick fog and fumes of the putrid propaganda of White supremacist triumphalism, what can we really see and sing by the dawn’s early light except Trump’s deformed and deficient conception of America unmasked? For all the hype, hustle and hypocrisy around “making America great again,” it presupposes an imaginary past void of its victims and of the violence, genocide, enslavement, segregation and…

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Georgetown University

Will America’s Universities Point The Way Towards Reparations For Slavery?

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

By Evan Gerstmann, Forbes — Georgetown University recently announced that it plans to raise around $400,000 a year to pay for reparations. They would go to the descendants of enslaved people who were exploited by Jesuit plantations and who were eventually sold to bring revenue to the university. A number of other universities, including Princeton Theological Seminary, have also announced plans for reparations. The moral case for reparations is easy to grasp….

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

The Homelessness Crisis – We Are Better Than This

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — I was returning from an errand when the skies opened up. The punishing rain came down with such vigor that despite an umbrella, the bottom inches of my pants were soaked. With my wash and wear hair, and just half a block more to walk, I shrugged the rain off, until I saw a woman sheltering herself from the rain in a narrow but covered side…

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Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., speaks during a hearing of the House Judiciary subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations, on Capitol Hill in Washington on April 4, 2017.Alex Brandon/AP

Former Michigan Rep. John Conyers, political icon dies at 90

By Commentaries/Opinions, Editors' Choice

Congressman John James Conyers Jr. (May 16, 1929 – October 27, 2019) By Herb Boyd — Unlike his often convulsive, tumultuous political career, former Congressman John Conyers, Jr. died peacefully in his sleep Sunday at his home in Detroit. The iconic and highly productive representative from Michigan was 90. More than half those 90 years were spent on the battleground for civil rights and public service, including 53 years as…

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