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Commentaries/Opinions

Trump and the American Gentry

Trump and the American Gentry

By Commentaries/Opinions

The jet-setting cosmopolitans of popular imagination exist, but they are far outnumbered by a less exalted and less discussed elite group, one that sits at the pinnacle of America’s local hierarchies. By Patrick Wyman, The Atlantic — American wealth and power usually have a certain look: glass-walled penthouse apartments in glittering urban skyscrapers, sprawling country mansions, ivy-covered prep schools, vacation homes in the Hamptons. These are the outward symbols of…

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Uhuru Kenyatta

Rev up Africa-CARICOM cooperation

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Jamaica Gleaner — Africa and Caribbean leaders touched on many of the relevant issues during their virtual summit earlier this month. But given the urgency of many of the global developments with which they have to contend, the leaders were not sufficiently specific, and robust, about those on which they intend to develop joint initiatives. There was not the sense of urgency for which we had hoped. That, we…

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Melvin Van Peebles

Melvin Van Peebles, Creative Genius

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — One of the first Broadway plays I ever saw was Melvin Van Peeble’s Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death.  A. Robert Phillips, who led the Black Talent Program at Boston College, arranged for a group of us undergraduates to attend the play, have dinner, and enjoy New York City. I was riveted by the powerful play, a series of vignettes performed by a talented ensemble, who…

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Border Patrol

Borders, Blackness, Empire

By Commentaries/Opinions

The spectacle of violence against Haitians at the U.S.-Mexico border needs to be seen in light of ongoing U.S. imperialism in Haiti. By Jemima Pierre, Black Agenda Report — It took two days. It took two days for the United States government to deport more than 6,000 asylum seekers to Haiti. Almost 15,000 people, all presumably Haitian, have been encamped on the banks of the Rio Grande River between Del…

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People gather around burning garbage in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Baseball has a debt to Haiti, and it’s time the sport repaid it

By Commentaries/Opinions

The sport can’t save Haiti, but it has a moral obligation to help a country rendered so hapless by all manner of catastrophe. By Kevin B. Blackistone, Washington Post — Baseball can’t save Haiti. But with the sudden and shocking arrival at the Texas border of thousands of Haitians fleeing murder, mayhem and utter misfortune in their Caribbean home — who must outrun Border Patrol agents on horseback doing their best impersonation of…

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thatcher-on-tv1

What is Neoliberalism? A Primer

By Commentaries/Opinions

By John Emerson, CounterPunch — “Neoliberalism” has been a hot topic for a few decades, but by now the word is sloppily used often enough that many claim that the word has become meaningless. However, it doesn’t work that way. The word neoliberalism has a definite meaning, even if it can be a tricky one, and it does not lose that meaning just because it is frequently misused. And it’s…

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Charging Bull

If climate change is the symptom, capitalism is the problem

By Commentaries/Opinions

Our planet cannot handle an eternal growth model. We live in a finite system and capitalist innovation can only take us so far. Eventually we run out of resources. Climate appears to be the limit. By Samantha Fox, Common Dreams — Too often climate change is reduced to quantification of greenhouse glasses or melting ice caps. These indicators of climate change are important to verify the existence of the problem,…

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Counterprotestors demonstrate in Washington, D.C., on September 18, 2021, against the “Justice for J6” rally supporting those arrested during the January 6 coup attempt.

Fascism makes a comeback — But nothing about its methods is especially new

By Commentaries/Opinions

The Trump movement’s assault on democracy is directly descended from both the Jim Crow era and the Nuremberg laws. By Matthew Rozsa, Salon — On Nov. 3, 2020, the American people conclusively decided to make Donald Trump their first one-term president in more than a quarter-century. On every previous occasion when an incumbent president was defeated — it had happened 10 times before Trump, the loser president at least swallowed his pride and honored…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Us, Steadfast in the Storms of History: 56 Years and 224 Seasons of Struggle

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — We of the organization Us have stayed standing and steadfast, weathered all kinds of storms and wrought various varieties of good for fifty-six years and 224 seasons, striving and struggling mightily to honor the African moral imperative and social mission to bring and sustain good in the world. I use the word “wrought” to indicate a kind of practice of excellence, a working and shaping…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Who gets flexibility?

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — I had not planned to have a policy conversation when I boarded my connecting flight from Detroit to DC. But the young white woman, totally professionally dressed, seemed to want my ear. She was coming to Washington to do “advocacy,” she said, around workplace flexibility and “reimagining work.” I thought girlie just wanted to hear herself talk, so my responses were minimal – um hum,…

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Larry Elder

Democrats won the California recall by invoking Trump. There’s more of that coming

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Philip Elliott, TIME — He wasn’t on the ballot, but ex-President Donald Trump lost Republicans their hopes of recalling California’s Democratic governor, Gavin Newsom. The result signals bad fortune for the GOP in statewide elections coming this year in Virginia and New Jersey. It may also hint at how Democrats may yet survive the 2022 midterms that even the most optimistic party loyalists anticipate will be very difficult. A…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Thank You, Black Women

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — When California governor Gavin Newsom woke up on Wednesday, September 15, 2021, I hope he fell to his knees and said, “Thank you, God, thank you, Black women.” To be sure, there are many others to thank, from the energized Chicanx/Latinx community to the Democrats who surged to the polls at the last minute. Some of the more prominent who thronged to his side were…

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