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John Quincy Adams House of Representatives Speech

Why a culture war over critical race theory?

By Commentaries/Opinions

Consider the pro-slavery congressional “Gag Rule” By Frank Palmeri and Ted Wendelin, HNN —  What is Critical Race Theory and why are Republican governors and state legislators saying such terrible things about it? If you are among the 99% of Americans who had never heard of this theory before a month or two ago, you might be forgiven for believing that it poses a grave threat to the United States…

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Black Lives Matter protesters march

To end racial capitalism, we will need to take on the institution of policing

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Activists who are working to defund the police are also part of a collective struggle to end neoliberal capitalism. By Henry A. Giroux, Truthout — The words “I can’t breathe” were not only uttered by Eric Garner and George Floyd as they were murdered by police. They were also uttered by over 70 others who died in law enforcement custody over the past decade after saying those same three words, according to…

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Photo 1 - Rastafari Alliance of Panama meets with the Archbishop of Panama to begin the process of an Afro Panamanian Reparations Commission

Rastafari Alliance of Panama meets with the Archbishop of Panama to begin the process of an Afro Panamanian Reparations Commission

By Commentaries/Opinions

Greetings community, Giving thanks to those whose shoulders we stand on. It is with great joy that I share the news of the recent work of the Rastafari Alliance of Panama. Members of the Rastafari Alliance of #Panama led by fellow Ambassador Ras Sela and other leaders from the #AfroPanamanian community, met with the Archbishop of Panama Jose Domingo Ulloa Mendieta to begin a process of establishing a #Reparations Commission…

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Dr Yosef A.A. ben Jochannan seated in the middle of legendary history scholars Dr. Ivan Van Sertima and Dr. John Henrik Clarke on Gil Noble’s talk show

The significance of the late Black Egyptologist Dr. Yosef A. A. Ben Jochannan

By Commentaries/Opinions

Dr Yosef A.A. ben Jochannan seated in the middle of legendary history scholars Dr. Ivan Van Sertima and Dr. John Henrik Clarke on Gil Noble’s talk show ‘Like It Is.’ Gil Noble was a pioneering Afrikan American journalist on ABC news in NYC. By Bashir Muhammad Akinyele — “Dr. Ben gave Kemet and Nile Valley Civilizations back to us” — Dr. Leonard Jeffries (legendary Africana Studies Professor) As I embark…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Juxtaposing Juneteenth and July Fourth: Emancipation, Independence and Democracy Claims

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — Seba Malcolm said it, we saw it and history has proved it. Indeed, he taught that “of all our studies, history is best qualified to reward our research.” Likewise, Dr. W. E. B. DuBois stated that “We can only understand the present by continually referring to and studying the past.” Thus, he continues saying “When anyone of the intricate phenomena of our daily life puzzles…

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Ben Jealous

The Insurrection and the Lost Cause

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By Ben Jealous — A violent insurrection engulfed the U.S. Capitol just six months ago. One United States Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick died and other Capitol police are still healing. Investigators are still going through video and social media documenting the attempt to disrupt congressional affirmation of President Joe Biden’s victory. Just six months ago. But many Republican leaders are already trying to rewrite the history of that day…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

The Road to Recovery Has Potholes

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — There is lots of great news in the June Employment Situation report. Eight hundred and fifty thousand jobs were created! And while the unemployment rate remained essentially unchanged at 5.9 percent, the labor market is showing signs of life. The Biden-Harris administration doesn’t mind crowing about it, either, noting that the three million jobs that have been created since they took office in late January…

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Stuyvesant Avenue (Slaveowner street names)

What would it take to strip New York City of slaveholders’ names?

By Commentaries/Opinions

Hundreds of New York City’s streets, neighborhoods, parks, schools, and other sites are odes to individuals and families who bought and sold slaves in New York. Five of the mayoral candidates have committed to changing that. Here’s how that’d work. By Caroline Spivack, Curbed — Chances are you’ve strolled through Prospect Lefferts Gardens without a second thought to the Leffertses themselves. The family was one of the wealthiest and most…

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An electoral official with an empty ballot box after the closing of the polls in the city of Bahir Dar, Ethiopia on June 21, 2021.

Ethiopia Is at a Crossroads. Can the Nation Survive in Its Current Form?

By Commentaries/Opinions

After recent national elections and with continued violence in Tigray, Ian Bremmer looks at the future of Ethiopia. By Ian Bremmer, TIME —  Ethiopia stands at a crossroads. On June 21, the country finally held the first round of long-delayed elections for the country’s parliament and Regional State Councils. Voting in the remaining 69 of the country’s 547 constituencies will take place in a second round in September. It’s not clear when…

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Renewable energy

How colonialism’s legacy makes it harder for countries to escape poverty and fossil fuels today

By Commentaries/Opinions

The fact that nearly half the world’s population is still struggling to escape poverty while global temperatures hurtle upward is not a coincidence. By Patrick Greiner, The Conversation — While fossil fuels were powering wealthy nations’ economic growth in the 19th and 20th centuries, many countries across the Global South remained largely impoverished. Today, all that burning of oil, coal and natural gas has warmed the planet toward dangerous levels, and…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

This anthem does not speak for me

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Frances Scott Key, author of the Star-Spangled Banner, our “National Anthem” was a dyed in the wool racist. He opined that “Negroes” were a “distinct and inferior race.” He was a slaveholder from a family of slaveholders who influenced the odious seventh President Andrew Jackson to appoint Roger Taney, the author of the Dred Scott decision (“Blacks have no rights that whites are bound to…

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History teacher Philip Jackson teaches the history of slavery to his eighth-graders

Here’s what I tell teachers about how to teach young students about slavery

By Commentaries/Opinions

Few issues are as difficult to deal with in the classroom as slavery in the US. Here, a professor who trains teachers on how to present the topic offers some insights. By Raphael E. Rogers, The Conversation — Nervous. Concerned. Worried. Wary. Unprepared. This is how middle and high school teachers have told me they have felt over the past few years when it comes to teaching the troublesome topic…

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