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IBW21

Donata Meirelles

Vogue Brazil director resigns over birthday photos evoking slavery

By | Commentaries/Opinions

Images show Donata Meirelles, who is white, sitting on a throne-like seat flanked by four black women dressed in white. By Anna Jean Kaiser, The Guardian — The fashion director of the Brazilian edition of Vogue has resigned after photos from her 50th birthday party drew criticism for evoking colonial depictions of slavery. Images from the party showed Donata Meirelles, who is white, sitting on a throne-like seat flanked by four black…

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racism-sucks-being-falsely-accused-of-racism-sucks-to

Smollett is Another Cautionary Warning About Screaming Racism — For Any and Everything

By | Commentaries/Opinions

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson, The Hutchinson Report — When actor Jussie Smollett claimed that he was the victim of a hate attack by MAGA backers complete with a noose around his attack, I instantly posted a Facebook comment, “be careful on this.” The responses were swift and brutal. But they boiled down to-“How dare you question that Smollett was anything other than a Black viciously assaulted by venomous Trump goaded…

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NYU

After Black Student Is Kept Out of Class Discussion, NYU School Acknowledges ‘Institutional Racism’

By | News & Current Affairs

While traveling abroad this week, a black graduate student at New York University says he was told by a classmate that a class discussion was easier to facilitate without a “black presence” in the room. Now administrators at NYU’s Silver School of Social Work have acknowledged that it has a problem with “ongoing institutional racism,” especially in the classroom. Shahem Mclaurin, a grad student in the Silver School, described the…

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A new Urban Institute report shows that capital in Baltimore flows along the city's historic racial redlining patterns

Are Reparations Baltimore’s Fix for Redlining, Investment Deprivation?

By | Editors' Choice

The solutions to Baltimore’s inequitable financing problems must be as radical as the policies that segregated the city in the first place, says Lawrence Brown. By Brentin Mock, City Lab — On December 19, 1910, the city of Baltimore passed an ordinance that a New York Times writer called “the most remarkable … ever entered upon the records of town or city of this country.” The ordinance made it illegal for any…

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Donald Trump

Trump Is the Real National Emergency

By | Editors' Choice

The president is using his executive power not to address a legitimate crisis, but to satisfy a political goal. By Matt Ford, The New Republic — President Donald Trump has announced that he will sign the compromise spending bill struck between Democrats and Republicans this week, which will avert another government shutdown and provide $1.375 billion for new barriers along the southern border. Unhappy with that amount—he had requested $5.7 billion from…

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In Michigan, which accounts for nearly half of all committed federal funds for blight demolition, the average cost paid with federal dollars increased by 90 percent in less than three years.

‘The Divided City’ warns of Detroit’s inequality

By | Commentaries/Opinions

By Bankole Thompson, Detroit News — Despite the revival taking place in cities like Detroit, Baltimore and Pittsburgh, they are being turned into “places of growing inequality where small, glittering enclaves of prosperity are ringed by larger areas of decline and where millions are relegated to lives of poverty and hopelessness.” That’s the message historian and author Alan Mallach conveys in his new book, “The Divided City: Poverty and Prosperity…

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Cory Booker and Kamala Harris

We’ve got two well-qualified black candidates in the field — and I might not vote for either of them. Here’s why.

By | Commentaries/Opinions

By D. Watkins — Back in 2008 America successfully elected its first black president, and we could possibly get another in 2020. (OK, I’m not holding my breath or anything.) There are two well-qualified and well-respected African-American candidates running at the time I write this: Sen. Kamala Harris of California and Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey. Becoming a black U.S. senator in America is almost impossible — there have…

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Henrietta Hilton, front left, daughter of tenant farmer William Hilton, and her fellow students, are seen in their ninth grade classroom in Summerton, S.C., June 4, 1954.

Race, Not Abortion Was the Founding Issue of the Religious Right

By | Editors' Choice

Though opposition to abortion is what many think fueled the powerful conservative white evangelical right, 81 percent of whom voted for Donald Trump, it was really school integration, according to Randall Balmer, chairman of the religion department. By Margery Eagan, The Boston Globe — Here are some facts that might surprise you. In 1971, two years before Roe v. Wade legalized abortion, the biggest white evangelical group in America, the…

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Donna Brazile speaks at the inauguration of New Orleans Mayor Latoya Cantrell in New Orleans on May 7, 2018.

Brazile: We Need ‘Some Reconciliation’ for African-Americans in U.S.; Follow South Africa Model

By | Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Nicholas Ballasy, PJ Media — WASHINGTON – CNN political analyst April Ryan, Washington bureau chief for American Urban Radio Networks, said past U.S. presidents like Bill Clinton and George W. Bush refused to formally “apologize for slavery” because it would lead to some form of reparations for descendants of slaves. “In my first book, I tackled the issue of reparations as a healing, as a possible healing, asking people……

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