Category

Editors’ Choice

Electoral College

The Electoral College’s Racist Origins

By Editors' Choice

More than two centuries after it was designed to empower southern white voters, the system continues to do just that. By Wilfred Codrington III, The Atlantic — s a color-blind political system possible under our Constitution? If it is, the Supreme Court’s evisceration of the Voting Rights Act in 2013 did little to help matters. While black people in America today are not experiencing 1950s levels of voter suppression, efforts…

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‘Hundreds of thousands are in prison for selling drugs because prosecutors maintained they were poisoning the community – but in Flint, where the whole community was poisoned, not one official was punished.’

I believe black Americans face a genocide. Here’s why I choose that word

By Editors' Choice

Consider the physical, financial, mental, even spiritual deaths inflicted on black Americans. By Ben Crump, The Guardian — In the weeks since the release of my book, Open Season: Legalized Genocide of Colored People, the question I’ve been asked most often is whether my use of the word genocide in the title was meant to be intentionally provocative, rather than reflective of reality. Surely, genocide is too strong a word…

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Donald Trump cynically thanked black voters for staying away from the polls in 2016, when black voter turnout declined sharply, with 765,000 fewer black Americans voting than in 2012.

Black millennials who refuse to vote are falling for a political fraud

By Editors' Choice

By Clyde W. Ford, The Los Angeles Times — In one of his first presidential speeches, Donald Trump said to a mostly white crowd in Hershey, Pa., “They didn’t come out to vote for Hillary. They didn’t come out. And that was big — so thank you to the African American community.” Had blacks voted in the numbers they did in 2012, Trump would probably not be president. So, his newly announced…

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The Library of Trinity College.

History Has a Race Problem, and It’s Existential

By Editors' Choice

By Allison Miller — History, as a discipline, has a race problem. White people dominate the study of history, as students and as those who earn PhDs. According to federal government statistics, in the school year 2016–17 (the most recent for which we had data at press time) white students received 74 percent of all history bachelor’s degrees, but only 56 percent of all US resident students enrolled in four-year colleges and universities were…

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Chains

How Reparations to Descendants of Slavery Can Heal a Nation

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

To truly understand the debt this country owes to Black people is to be liberated from the bondage of miseducation that we’ve remained shackled to in the so-called land of the free. By Zenobia Jeffries Warfield, Yes Magazine — On a spring day, I stood at the corner of Madison and Pennsylvania avenues in the nation’s capital, transfixed on the building in front of me. Passersby zigzagged around me. In…

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In this Nov. 19, 2002, photo, students walk through the Harvard Law School area on the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass.

Harvard Law School traces its origins to an Antiguan slave owner. Now the country wants reparations.

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Meagan Flynn, The Washington Post — In an urgently worded letter recently sent to Harvard, Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister Gaston Browne demanded that the university pay his country reparations “for the gains Harvard enjoyed at the expense” of Antiguan slaves. Browne’s Oct. 30 letter to Harvard University President Lawrence Bacow — reported Tuesday night by the Miami Herald and Harvard Crimson — draws a direct line from Harvard Law School’s success today…

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Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves

St Vincent PM urges Caricom to speed up reparation claims

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

St Vincent and the Grenadines Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves has urged Caricom leaders to raise the issue of reparations for indigenous peoples and African slaves with their European counterparts as a priority. He said if those conversations do not yield tangible results, then Caricom leaders must explore all legal and political options available to them for redress. “We have to have a conversation with the British, with the French in the case of Haiti, the Dutch,…

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David Comissiong

Ambassador David Comissiong’s most recent Address on Reparations

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

Address by Ambassador David Comissiong to the West and Central Africa Conference on the United Nations International Decade for People of African Descent Organized by the United Nations Commission for Human Rights and the African Union Dakar, Senegal (23-24 October, 2019). In 1834, after 225 years of relentless rebellion by our enslaved ancestors, slavery was abolished throughout the British Empire: and the methodology devised by the British Government for the…

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The Massacre That Spawned the Alt-Right

By Editors' Choice

Forty years ago, a gang of Klansmen and Nazis murdered five communists in broad daylight. America has never been the same. By Shaun Assael and Peter Keating, Politico — “Death to the Klan!” On Saturday, November 3, 1979, that chant swept over Morningside Homes, a mostly black housing project in Greensboro, North Carolina, as dozens of protesters—some donning blue hard hats for protection—hammered placards onto signposts and danced in the…

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Ta-Nehisi Coates

An Ongoing Battle. Ta-Nehisi Coates’s narratives of freedom.

By Editors' Choice

History has always been a weapon in the hands of Ta-Nehisi Coates. Now, in his debut novel, the social critic and essayist sets out to recover those struggles for emancipation that have been lost to the past. By Elias Rodriques, The Nation — American history has always been a weapon in the hands of Ta-Nehisi Coates. As a blogger and columnist for The Atlantic, he wielded it to chronicle the long…

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