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Editors’ Choice

Courtney Tate

Black Americans are deeply pessimistic about the country under Trump, whom more than 8 in 10 describe as ‘a racist,’ Post-Ipsos poll finds

By Editors' Choice

By Cleve R. Wootson Jr., Vanessa Williams, Dan Balz and Scott Clement — President Trump made a stark appeal to black Americans during the 2016 election when he asked, “What have you got to lose?” Three years later, black Americans have rendered their verdict on his presidency with a deeply pessimistic assessment of their place in the United States under a leader seen by an overwhelming majority as racist. The findings…

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Plaque depicting warrior and attendants (16th-17th century), Edo peoples, Benin kingdom, Nigeria.

Liberating the precolonial history of Africa

By Editors' Choice

The West focuses only on slavery, but the history of Africa is so much more than a footnote to European imperialism. By Toby Green / Edited by Sam Haselby, Aeon — To understand the complexity and significance of West African history, there is no better thing to do than to go to Freetown. Sierra Leone’s capital is sited in the lee of the ‘lion-shaped’ mountain that gives the country its…

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Dr. Ralph E. Gonsalves, Sir Louis Straker and staff at the Mission to the United Nations.

SVG begins ‘historic journey’ on UN Security Council

By Editors' Choice

By Nelson A. King, Caribbean Life News — As St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Wednesday officially assumed a non-permanent seat on the United Nations’ Security Council, the country’s Ambassador to the UN, I. Rhonda King, says the “historic journey” begins with “Three Stories and a Prayer: The Manifestation of the Prophetic Imagination.” “With the audacity of David, the widow’s faith, the spirit of Chatoyer, the prayer of Saint Francis…

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Mourners carry a cross in Port-au-Prince, in January, 2019, to honor the victims of the 7.0-magnitude earthquake that devastated Haiti

Haiti Faces Difficult Questions Ten Years After a Devastating Earthquake

By Editors' Choice

By Edwidge Danticat, The New Yorker — This past December, as what would have been my mother’s eighty-fourth birthday approached, I kept dreaming of death. In the most frequent of these dreams, my mother, who died, of ovarian cancer, in October, 2014, in Miami, is telling me to run out of the single-story house where I spent most of my childhood, in Port-au-Prince, before the house falls on top of me…

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Opal Tometi

Black Lives Matter is Alive and Well

By Editors' Choice

By Opal Tometi, The Guardian Nigeria — The murder of Trayvon Benjamin Martin in 2012 and the acquittal of the ‘killer cop’ George Zimmerman revealed an already-established fact: the Black race’s freedom is only an illusion. Standing on the shoulders of his death, three black women, Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi will rise in 2013 to start a revolutionary movement called Black Lives Matter. A few weeks later, millions…

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‘Unfortunately for us, there is no William Monroe Trotter in 2020. Nor is there a Boston Guardian demanding that the black press “hold a mirror up to nature”.’

The radical black newspaper that declared ‘none are free unless all are free’

By Editors' Choice

In 1901, William Trotter founded an other Guardian – the Boston Guardian – to ‘hold a mirror up to nature’. We could use something similar today, writes Kerri Greenidge. By Kerri Greenidge — In 1901, William Monroe Trotter founded the Guardian newspaper in Boston. At that time, the more famous Guardian – the one you’re now reading – was published in Manchester, and Trotter had never traveled further than Chillicothe, Ohio.…

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Adora Nweze, president of the Florida conference of the N.A.A.C.P.

N.A.A.C.P. Tells Local Chapters: Don’t Let Energy Industry Manipulate You

By Editors' Choice

The civil rights group is trying to stop state and local branches from accepting money from utilities that promote fossil fuels and then lobbying on their behalf. By Ivan Penn, New York Times — Editor’s Note: Jacqueline Patterson who is quoted in this NYT news report is a member of the Board of Directors of the Institute of the Black World (IBW) and head of the Dept. of Environmental Justice…

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“Colfax Massacre” in Louisiana.

‘The War of Races’: How a hateful ideology echoes through American history

By Editors' Choice

From slavery to Reconstruction to Dylann Roof, the idea of “race war” has a long and bloody legacy in the United States. By Michael E. Miller, The Washington Post — It was high noon on Easter 1873 when the white mob came riding into Colfax. Five months earlier, Louisiana had held its second election since the end of the Civil War and the beginning of black male suffrage. But some…

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Norse chessmen, from a Viking hoard, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.

White Supremacists Have Weaponized an Imaginary Viking Past. It’s Time to Reclaim the Real History

By Editors' Choice

Real Viking society was multicultural and multiracial. So where does the white supremacist vision of their genealogy come from? By Dorothy Kim, Times — After New Zealand passed new gun laws this week, most automatic and semi-automatic weapons have become outlawed there as of Friday — a swift response to the March 15 shootings in Christchurch that left 50 Muslim men, women and children dead at the hands of an alleged white supremacist terrorist….

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A drug seller's story: Corvain - Drug Policy Alliance

Rethinking the “Drug Dealer”

By Editors' Choice

By Alyssa Stryker, DPA — Policymakers in the United States increasingly recognize that drug use should be treated as a public health issue instead of a criminal issue. Most, however, continue to support harsh criminal sentences for people who are involved with drug selling or distribution. With more than 68,000 people in the United States dying from accidental drug overdoses in 2018 alone, many people are searching for someone to blame…

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