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Editors’ Choice

Freddie Jenkins’ mother attended what is now the last standing African American schoolhouse in Mount Pleasant, S.C., in the 1930s.

Slavery’s descendants say a reparations check won’t make the pain go away

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Tyrone Beason, Los Angeles Times — CHARLESTON, S.C. — Five years before the first shots of the Civil War rang out from the harbor here in 1861, alderman Thomas Ryan and a business partner opened Ryan’s Mart at No. 6 Chalmers St. Their merchandise was slaves: African men, women and children who were prodded, picked over and auctioned off to the highest bidders. The finest adult males could fetch…

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University of Glasgow

The Meaning of the University of Glasgow Reparations Settlement

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By David Commissiong — The recent announcement that the University of Glasgow has apologised for its role in slavery and has agreed to provide ₤20 Million to fund Caribbean developmental projects that will be undertaken in collaboration with the University of the West Indies (UWI) suggests that the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is in the process of settling upon a sensible and workable strategy for the pursuit of the goal of the payment of Reparations or compensation…

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Hitler

Leading Civil Rights Lawyer Shows 20 Ways Trump Is Copying Hitler’s Early Rhetoric and Policies

By Editors' Choice

The author, Burt Neuborne, is one of America’s top civil liberties lawyers, and questions whether federal government can contain Trump and GOP power grabs. By Steven Rosenfeld — A new book by one of the nation’s foremost civil liberties lawyers powerfully describes how America’s constitutional checks and balances are being pushed to the brink by a president who is consciously following Adolf Hitler’s extremist propaganda and policy template from the…

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Skin tone band-aids

The Fight to Redefine Racism

By Editors' Choice

In “How to Be an Antiracist,” Ibram X. Kendi argues that we should think of “racist” not as a pejorative but as a simple, widely encompassing term of description. By Kelefa Sanneh, The New Yorker — Sixteen years ago, in 2003, the student newspaper at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, a historically black institution in Tallahassee, published a lively column about white people. “I don’t hate whites,” the author, a…

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Rhiana Gunn-Wright

Meet Rhiana Gunn-Wright, An Architect Behind The Green New Deal

By Editors' Choice

By Donna M. Owens, Essence — Rhiana Gunn-Wright was always curious about policy, even before she fully understood the term. “Growing up I’d wonder about structures—in my neighborhood and schools,” the 29-year-old South Side Chicago native told ESSENCE. “What are the rules, who made the rules? You can’t just look at the surface.” Raised by her mother, grandmother, extended family, and a caring “village,” the Yale grad and Rhodes Scholar…

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Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison’s Black Art Spoke in a Nation That Would Silence Us

By Editors' Choice

By Eisa Nefertari Ulen, Truthout — “To create art amid sorrow or oppression is to insist on excavating meaning from the dull senselessness of pain. It is to be alive and speaking back. Art dives headfirst into the uncharted perils and delights of the human condition. For people whose humanity is often denied, taking that plunge with an audience is inherently rebellious.” —Hannah Giorgis My mother called to tell me…

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Thomas Cole: The Course of Empire: Destruction (1836)

America Is Not Rome. It Just Thinks It Is

By Editors' Choice

By Tom Holland, NYR Daily — When Edward Gibbon embarked on his great history of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, he began his narrative with the accession of Commodus. Marcus Aurelius, the father of the new emperor, was a man who, in the noblest traditions of the Roman people, had combined the attributes of a warrior, a statesman, and a philosopher; Commodus was none of these. “The…

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Dr. Lezli Baskerville, President/CEO, President/CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education

Black Wealth 2020 Adds HBCUs to Its Economic Empowerment Agenda

By Editors' Choice

The catalyst for Black wealth also applauds Robert Smith’s gift to Morehouse Graduates. By Hazel Trice Edney — The short-term economic impact of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) is $15 billion – rivaling corporations such as Bank of America in its more than 177,000 employees. Yet, according to the U. S. Department of Education, approximately 60 percent of all Black college students have no expectation of family financial contributions to…

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Civil rights advocates carry placards during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in Washington

Truth and Reconciliation: Addressing Systematic Racism in the United States

By Commentaries/Opinions, Editors' Choice

By Danyelle Solomon — 2019 marks the 400th anniversary of Africans sold into bondage arriving on Virginia’s shores. It has been 156 years since the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, 55 years since the end of Jim Crow, and 51 years since the civil rights movement. All of these moments in U.S. history represent crossroads—moments where the country made a choice or where people demanded that the words on the pages of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights became more than words; that policies and practices were equitably distributed among all people, not just a select few…

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Protests and lawsuits against North Carolina's notorious anti-transgender "bathroom bill" have led to a legal settlement that's being hailed by human rights advocates. But lawmakers in other states are continuing to target the transgender community with discriminatory proposals.

Southern lawmakers continue attacks on transgender people amid crisis of violence

By Editors' Choice

By Benjamin Barber, Facing South — This year has seen the continuation of an alarming epidemic of violence against transgender people in the United States. At least a dozen transgender people have been killed already this year, most of them women of color, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Nine of these murders have occurred in the South — yet lawmakers in Southern states have continued to target the transgender community…

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