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Editors’ Choice

H.R.40 - Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act

House Resolution 40 Why We Can’t Wait | #ReparationsNow

By Editors' Choice

Editor’s Note: The ongoing mass protests against police violence and racial inequality demand that we no longer be comfortable with the status quo. We need a national reckoning with structural racism in all its forms, which permeate every aspect of our society and create separate conditions for Black and white life in the US. House Resolution (HR) 40 is the answer to the moment we are in. It would establish a commission…

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Donald Trump

If Trump Wins, It Is the End of Democracy

By Editors' Choice

NYU fascism expert explains the next moves in Trump’s “authoritarian playbook” — and says it’s almost too late. By Chauncey Devega, Salon — At the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, there’s a poster which identifies “The 12 Early Warning Signs of Fascism.” Here are the criteria: Powerful and continuing nationalism Disdain for human rights Identification of enemies as a unifying cause Rampant sexism Controlled mass media Obsession with national security Religion and…

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Rev. C.T. Vivian

The Rev. C.T. Vivian: At Age 95, Gone Too Soon

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Cordy Tindale “C. T.” Vivian July 30, 1934 – July 17, 2020. By The SDPC — The Rev. C.T. Vivian, who made history the day he was brutally confronted by Sheriff Jim Clark in 1965 in Selma after 1400 black voters were prohibited from registering to vote, has made his transition and sits with the ancestors. Rev. Vivian, who was a 2016 recipient of the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference, Inc. (SDPC)…

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"Why would $300 keep me from voting?" asks Robert Peoples of Mobile, Alabama.

A poll tax by any other name

By Editors' Choice

“Why would $300 keep me from voting?” asks Robert Peoples of Mobile, Alabama. By Dana Sweeney, Facing South — Robert Peoples remembers when African Americans won the right to vote in Alabama back in 1965. Though he was only 13 years old at the time, he had grown up in Mobile with a front-row seat to history as it was forged by a generation of ordinary Alabamians who won extraordinary…

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An open letter to White Evangelical leaders

By Editors' Choice

White Privilege is “White Blessing” and the Horrifying Legacy of Black Oppression. By Rev. Dennis Dillon, The Christian Times — I write this letter to Louie Giglio, Rick Warren, Charles Stanley, James Dobson, Paula White, Tony Perkins, Luke Barnett, William Donohue, J. D. Greear, Doug Clay, John Hagee, Steve Pettit, Rod Parsley, Kenneth Copeland, and the thousands of White evangelical pastors and faith leaders across the United States of America….

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A print of U.S. President Andrew Jackson at the Battle of Tallushatchee, 1813.

This Land Is Not Your Land

By Editors' Choice

The Ethnic Cleansing of Native Americans By David Treuer — In his first annual message to the U.S. Congress, in 1829, U.S. President Andrew Jackson—a slave-owning real estate speculator already famous for burning down Creek settlements and hounding the survivors of the Creek War of 1813–14—called for the “voluntary” migration of Native Americans to lands west of the Mississippi River. Six months later, in the spring of 1830, he signed…

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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

How to Sustain Momentum for the Anti-Racism Movement

By Editors' Choice

By Kareem Abdul-Jabbar — “I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear.” My old UCLA coach, John Wooden, used to quote that Walt Whitman poem often, and I’ve been hearing its echoes on the streets lately. The people out protesting systemic racism and vowing change are “singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs” about the America that could be — that should be. But in my 60 years of social…

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Corporations grapple with slavery reparations

Corporations grapple with slavery reparations

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Courtenay Brown, Axios — The debate over reparations for slavery has moved from the political realm to the corporate one. At least two big British companies — insurer Lloyd’s of London and brewer Greene King — promised to make certain amends for their role in slavery. But activists want them and other companies to do more. Why it matters: We usually hear about reparations as a political issue — a “societal…

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Andros, Bahamas

No Mining in Andros The Bahamas

By Editors' Choice

Andros Island. Editors Note: We are sharing a petition started by De’Ann Forbes directed to the Bahamas government, Bahamas National Trust, Bahamian enviroment Protection Foundation, Save The Bays and Forfar Field Station. By De’Ann Forbes — For many years our country has been exploited and our natural resources taken from us the Bahamian people. There is no way we the Androsians will sell our rights and the rights of our…

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The grand buildings of Bordeaux, France, were financed, in part, by the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The city has moved to address that past.

George Floyd’s Killing Forces Wider Debate on France’s Slave-Trading Past

By Editors' Choice

Rather than tear down statues, some argue that the past should not be obliterated, but remembered and explained. By Norimitsu Onishi, The New York Times — BORDEAUX, France — At a bend in the river, a succession of stately stone buildings, each more imposing than the last, stretches along the left bank. Their elegant 18th-century facades had helped Bordeaux, already famous for its wineries, become a UNESCO World Heritage site.…

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