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Editors’ Choice

To Curb Ghost Workers and Coffee Corruption, Africa Turns to Blockchain

To Curb Ghost Workers and Coffee Corruption, Africa Turns to Blockchain

By | Editors' Choice

From Ethiopia to Tanzania and South Africa to Ghana, African nations are embracing this ledger technology to weed out graft. By Kizito Makoye, OZY — On his first day in office as president of Tanzania in 2015, John Pombe Magufuli made a surprise visit to the Finance Ministry and berated officials who weren’t at work. It was the first in a series of steps Magufuli has taken that have won…

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How Jesus Became So Widely Accepted as White

Here’s How Jesus Became So Widely Accepted as White

By | Editors' Choice, Video/Audio

By Felice León, The Root — It’s no secret that Jesus Christ, known in Christian circles as the Son of God, is often depicted as a white man. But, how did the Son of God become so widely accepted as a European? After all, there are very few physical descriptions of Jesus in the bible. Keri L. Day, an associate professor of Constructive Theology and African American Religion at the…

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U.S. Has More Military Operations in Africa Than the Middle East

Exclusive: U.S. Has More Military Operations in Africa Than the Middle East

By | Editors' Choice

By Nick Turse, Vice — The deadly ambush in Niger last October that left four U.S. serviceman dead prompted months of hand-wringing inside the Pentagon. But that botched operation, which drew national attention to U.S. counterterror operations throughout Africa should not have shocked military leadership, the former commander of U.S. Special Operations forces in Africa told VICE News. “These weren’t the first casualties, either. We had them in Somalia and…

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When Mandela's Predecessor Toured the Us to Expose Segregation Back Home

When Mandela’s Predecessor Toured the Us to Expose Segregation Back Home

By | Editors' Choice

Solomon Plaatje, an early ANC leader, came to America in 1921 to expose the growing number of race laws back home. By Matthew Blackman, OZY — A short, well-dressed 44-year-old man of the southern African Barolong tribe stood at the American border near Niagara Falls holding Canadian passport No. 79551. It stated the bearer was a British national and a resident of Toronto. In fact, he was Solomon Plaatje, the…

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Globe - Africa

How Africa can provide the leadership the world needs

By | Editors' Choice

By Ihron Rensburg, University World News — What will be Global Africa’s unique contribution to the creation of a new, different, inclusive, caring, decolonised future as it, Global Africa, rises, carefully and unsteadily, to leadership of the world over the course of the next three generations, and as, concomitantly, Chinese leadership rises and then recedes? If we look at the way African higher education has responded to this challenge until now…

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Faith leaders from communities throughout New York City lead a demonstration and prayer vigil on the steps of City Hall in protest to the Staten Island, New York grand jury's recent decision not to indict a police officer involved in the chokehold death of Eric Garner in July on December 12, 2014 in New York City.

The Capitalism/Racism Partnership- The Basics

By | Editors' Choice

Revulsion is building towards the smokescreens of hypocrisy, racism, and nationalism barely masking capitalism’s ongoing failure to provide the jobs and incomes people need. By Richard Wolff, Common Dreams — In the wake of W.E.B. DuBois ’s 150th birthday, his works offer a lens through which to assess US capitalism’s relationship to racism today. He famously wrote: “Capitalism cannot reform itself; it is doomed to self-destruction,” while adding…

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NFL

The Intersection of Race, Politics, and Sports Today

By | Editors' Choice

By Gary M. Pomerantz, Signature — Today’s intersection of race, politics and sports harks back to the 1960’s. That time’s images live in our imagination: Muhammad Ali, loudly defiant, and sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, fists thrust overhead in protest. The undeniable power of those moments has obscured a truth that today’s athletes might want to consider: there can be a cost to ignoring…

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‘A reparative justice programme’ … Glasgow University has completed a two-year review of how it grew wealthy from the slave trade. Photograph: University of Glasgow

Reparations for slavery are not about punishing children for parents’ sins

By | Editors' Choice, Reparations

Reparative justice, whereby communities are compensated for losses caused by the slavery or the Holocaust, is morally fair. By Julian Baggini, The Guardian — Justice requires a good memory, one that is both accurate and not self-servingly selective. But whether it is well-served by a long memory is more contentious. We know that many still pay the price for sins previous generations never paid for. But most agree with the…

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J.C.H. Grabill/Library of Congress The caption says: Famous Battery “E” of 1st Artillery. These brave men and the Hotchkiss gun that Big Foot’s Indians thought were toys, together with the fighting 7th what’s left of Gen. Custer’s boys, sent 200 Indians to that Heaven which the ghost dancer enjoys. This checked the Indian noise and Gen. Miles with staff returned to Illinois.

What White Supremacists Know

By | Commentaries/Opinions, Editors' Choice

The violent theft of land and capital is at the core of the U.S. experiment: the U.S. military got its start in the wars against Native Americans. By Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Boston Review — The United States has been at war every day since its founding, often covertly and often in several parts of the world at once. As ghastly as that sentence is, it still does not capture the full…

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U.S. Air Force, soldiers of the East Africa Response Force (EARF) depart from a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules in Juba, South Sudan, Dec. 21, 2013

The US Military Is All Over Africa Despite Not Being at War in Africa

By | Editors' Choice

There are currently roughly 7,500 US military personnel, including 1,000 contractors, deployed in Africa. For comparison, that figure was only 6,000 just a year ago. By Strategic Culture Foundation, Mint Press News — The theft of Africa continues despite the era of colonialism and slavery being over. The west continues to steal Africa’s plentiful resources turning a wealthy continent into poor people. Al Jazeera reports: “Africa is rich, but we…

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