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Editors’ Choice

Fatima Garcia of the group Danza Azteca Guadalupana dances during an event celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Austin, Texas, on Saturday.

Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Explained

By Editors' Choice

Many cities and states are observing the day. Here’s some of the history behind it. By Melina Delkic, NYT — President Biden has proclaimed Monday, Oct. 11, as Indigenous Peoples’ Day, becoming the first U.S. president to formally recognize the day. “For generations, Federal policies systematically sought to assimilate and displace Native people and eradicate Native cultures,” Mr. Biden wrote in the proclamation issued on Friday. “Today, we recognize Indigenous peoples’…

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American Indian Movement (AIM) took down a statue of Columbus near the Minnesota State Capitol in St. Paul

The forgotten history of solidarity between Black and Indigenous freedom movements

By Editors' Choice

By Kyle T. Mays, HNN — Since the emergence of Black Lives Matter in 2013, the Standing Rock Sioux-led global protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline, and more recently, the murders of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, Black and Indigenous co-resistance has once again come to the forefront of our national consciousness. Instead of calls to “police the police” or for “community control” of police from the 1960s, activists have…

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What is Critical Race Theory, and why is it under attack?

What is Critical Race Theory, and why is it under attack?

By Editors' Choice

By Stephen Sawchuk, EducationWeek — Is “critical race theory” a way of understanding how American racism has shaped public policy, or a divisive discourse that pits people of color against white people? Liberals and conservatives are in sharp disagreement. The topic has exploded in the public arena this spring—especially in K-12, where numerous state legislatures are debating bills seeking to ban its use in the classroom. In truth, the divides are not…

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Trump in Oval Office

The New Trump Coup

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By Bill Blum — By now, it should be abundantly clear that the insurrection of January 6, 2021, was not a spontaneous uprising perpetrated by an angry horde of amped-up Trump supporters. To the contrary, the insurrection was the culmination of an attempted coup designed to prevent the peaceful transition of power. But while the insurrection failed, a new coup is brewing and gathering steam. It is being spurred by…

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CARICOM flag

September 2021 Africa-CARICOM Summit Communique

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History was made on September 7th 2021, when the inaugural Africa-CARICOM Summit was held virtually under the theme ‘Unity Across Continents and Oceans: Opportunities for Deepening Integration’. The meeting, which was delayed a year due to the pandemic, aimed at ‘Promoting closer collaboration between Africa Diaspora, People of African Descent and the Caribbean and Pacific region and institutions.’ Communique

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Understanding Islam

Articles on understanding Islam

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Why some Muslim women feel empowered wearing hijab, a headscarf By Kalpana Jain, The Conversation — For some Muslim women, wearing a hijab can be a religious act but Muslim women’s clothing isn’t entirely about faith. It has been used – and is still used – as an assertion of identity. Read more Understanding Islam – a brief introduction to its past and present in the United States By Kalpana…

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Congresswoman Barbara Lee

Rep. Barbara Lee introduces a Congressional Resolution on the UN’s Decade for People of African Descent

By Editors' Choice

Rep. Barbara Lee — Whereas the International Day for People of African Descent will be celebrated for the first time on 31 August 2021; Whereas the United Nations has created this observance via resolution 75/170 in an effort to “promote the extraordinary contributions of the African diaspora around the world and to eliminate all forms of discrimination against people of African descent”; Whereas the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 2015-2024…

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Church Haiti Earthquake 2021

The disasters in Afghanistan and Haiti share the same twisted root

By Editors' Choice

Half a world away from one another, the citizens of two nations are suffering as a result of the corruption and incompetence of the U.S. By Jonathan M. Katz, TNR — Last week, the world shook twice. The first shock hit Haiti, when a 7.2 magnitude earthquake erupted beneath the island’s southern peninsula. Homes, churches, and hotels crumbled in the cities of Les Cayes and Jérémie and in nearby villages. More than…

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Hospital Beds at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, 2020.

How capitalism made the world sick

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Rupa Marya and Raj Patel’s Inflamed argues that the human cost of our economic system is a key to understanding the health of the world. By Sarah Jones, The Nation — No one should pay for a coronavirus test. This is not a moral judgment but a statement of fact; the US government has decreed it so. Insurers are supposed to cover the tests, at no cost to the consumer….

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9 Black millionaires who built wealth outside of sports and entertainment

9 Black millionaires who built wealth outside of sports and entertainment

By Editors' Choice

By Njera Perkins, AfroTech — For generations, Black Americans have been taught that our golden ticket to wealth and becoming Black millionaires is by making it as athletes or entertainers. But that’s a very one-sided picture that has been painted for us that fails to acknowledge the many Black entrepreneurs that found success outside of those expectations. Individuals beyond the realm of big-name sports figures, music and movie stars have managed to…

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Soldier's Burden

Groundhog Day or Imperial Reckoning?

By Editors' Choice

Afghanistan’s Armageddon 20 Years After 9/11 Offers Foreign Policy Choices By Ed Rampell, LA Progressive — As the Afghanistan Armageddon unravels, this humiliating, devastating defeat for the US and its allies and the 20th anniversary of 9/11 (and who knows what may take place to mark that day?), plus the June 29 death of war monger extraordinaire Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, are wakeup calls. They offer Americans the chance to reflect…

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U.S. Military in Iraq

Blood in the sand

By Editors' Choice

The U.S. has nothing to show for its efforts after trillions of dollars were spent on wars in Iraq, Syria, Libya, and beyond, but blood in the sand. By Jeffrey Sachs — The magnitude of the United States’ failure in Afghanistan is breathtaking. It is not a failure of Democrats or Republicans, but an abiding failure of American political culture, reflected in U.S. policymakers’ lack of interest in understanding different…

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