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Editors’ Choice

School children, school bus

What White Kids Learn About Race in School

By Editors' Choice

Sixty-five years after Brown v. Board of Education, U.S. schools remain largely segregated. This matters not only because white and black students experience very different educational outcomes, but also because school is where children form many of their ideas about race and privilege. By Erik Loomis, Boston Review — In 1954 the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that the segregation of schools was unconstitutional, but in fact schools…

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Ta-Nehisi Coates

How Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Novel Reckons With the Past

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

“The Water Dancer” comes out of a powerful examination of the legacies of slavery today. By Eric Herschthal, The New Republic — Eight years ago, Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote an essay in The Atlantic asking why so few black people studied the Civil War. Coates noted that he himself had only recently become an avid reader of Civil War history, and along with it, a student of the larger system that propelled it into…

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YouTube, Nazi

How Teachers Are Fighting the White Nationalists Brainwashing Their Students

By Editors' Choice

“This will get worse before it gets better.” By Tess Owen, Vice —  It used to be much easier to spot a budding Nazi in the classroom, or at least a student harboring extremist views, says Nora Flanagan, who’s been a public school teacher in Chicago for over 20 years. You’d just look out for the troubled skinhead kid, maybe wearing steel-toed boots and a swastika pin. Today, it’s more…

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Black Woman

With Reparations, We Must Demand Repair—and Heal Ourselves

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

Note: This is part two of this six-part series by YES! that explores the plurality of reparations that includes Black people’s spiritual and psychological healing. By David Ragland YES! — The first panel at the National Grassroots Reparations Convening in Ferguson, Missouri, earlier this month was titled “Spirituality, Healing and Reparations.” Facilitator Rev. Emma Jordan-Simpson, executive director at Fellowship of Reconciliation, the organization cohosting the four-day convening, opened the discussion…

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Slave Patrol

Slavery and the Origins of the American Police State

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

From the beginning, some Americans have been able to move more freely than others. By Ben Fountain, Medium — They were called patrollers or, variously, “paterollers,” “paddyrollers,” or “patterolls,” and they were meant to be part of the solution to Colonial America’s biggest problem, labor. Unlike Great Britain, which had a large, basically immobile peasant class that could be forced to work for subsistence wages, there weren’t enough cheap bodies…

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FBI agents walk past a memorial outside the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh

Inside the White Supremacist Movement

By Editors' Choice

Michael German, a former federal agent, spent years infiltrating white supremacist groups. Here’s what he has to say about what’s going on now. By Joe Sexton, ProPublica — Late in 2017, ProPublica began writing about a California white supremacist group called the Rise Above Movement. Its members had been involved in violent clashes at rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, and several cities in California. They were proud of their violent handiwork,…

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Prisons

American Gulag: Our Prisons Get More Oppressive by the Day

By Editors' Choice

By John W. Whitehead, CounterPunch — “The exile of prisoners to a distant place, where they can ‘pay their debt to society,’ make themselves useful, and not contaminate others with their ideas or their criminal acts, is a practice as old as civilization itself. The rulers of ancient Rome and Greece sent their dissidents off to distant colonies. Socrates chose death over the torment of exile from Athens. The poet…

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Ibram X. Kendi

How to Be an Anti-Racist, according to Ibram X Kendi

By Editors' Choice

In his new book, Kendi noted that “racial inequity is a problem of bad policy, not bad people.” By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire — Ibram X. Kendi admittedly once trivialized racism. The American University professor placed some of the blame for race relations in America on blacks. In a speech delivered in 2000, while he was still in high school, Kendi suggested African Americans were too busy blaming their…

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Teaching America’s truth

How is slavery taught in America? Schools struggle to teach it well.

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

Teaching America’s truth For generations, children have been spared the whole, terrible reality about slavery’s place in U.S. history, but some schools are beginning to strip away the deception and evasions. By Joe Heim, The Washington Post  — Pacing his classroom in north-central Iowa, Tom McClimon prepared to deliver an essential truth about American history to his eighth-grade students. He stopped and slowly raised his index finger in front of…

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People explore the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

A brief history of the enduring phony science that perpetuates white supremacy

By Editors' Choice

By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post — The mysterious and chronic sickness had been afflicting slaves for years, working its way into their minds and causing them to flee from their plantations. Unknown in medical literature, its troubling symptoms were familiar to masters and overseers, especially in the South, where hundreds of enslaved people ran from captivity every year. On March 12, 1851, the noted physician Samuel A. Cartwright…

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