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Editors’ Choice

U.S. Air Force, soldiers of the East Africa Response Force (EARF) depart from a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules in Juba, South Sudan, Dec. 21, 2013

The US Military Is All Over Africa Despite Not Being at War in Africa

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There are currently roughly 7,500 US military personnel, including 1,000 contractors, deployed in Africa. For comparison, that figure was only 6,000 just a year ago. By Strategic Culture Foundation, Mint Press News — The theft of Africa continues despite the era of colonialism and slavery being over. The west continues to steal Africa’s plentiful resources turning a wealthy continent into poor people. Al Jazeera reports: “Africa is rich, but we…

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U.S. president Barack Obama, Michelle Obama and their daughters Malia and Sasha stand at the “Door of No Return” during their visit to the Cape Coast Castle, Ghana, July 11, 2009

How Ghana made itself the African home for a return of the black diaspora

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By Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu, Quartz Africa — In a recently released music video, Fuse ODG and Damian Marley (Bob Marley’s youngest son) explore the themes of slavery, colonialism, black pride and modern day police brutality. ‘Bra Fie’(which translates from the Ghanaian language Akan as “Come Home”) is an Afrobeats tune that harks back to the pan-Africanist themes of some of the older Marley’s anthemic hits. But it could also be a soundtrack for…

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SNCC protesters march in Montgomery, 1965

Documenting and Digitizing Democracy: The SNCC Digital Gateway

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By Ashley Farmer, Black Perspectives — “Learn from the Past, Organize the Future, Make Democracy Work.” This is the mission statement that greets visitors at the SNCC Digital Gateway—a wide-ranging, collaborative website that documents and animates the history of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Founded in April 1960 under the guidance of veteran activist Ella Baker, SNCC became a leading civil rights organization due to countless young organizers who engaged in voter…

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Joe Neguse, a Democrat, became Colorado’s first black congressman this week.

How Did Race Play on Election Day? ‘Near Civil War-Like’? Or ‘It Really Didn’t Matter’?

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Victories in communities that had never elected a black representative run counter to the divisive rhetoric that played out in some contests across the country. By John Eligon, The New York Times — When Joe Neguse discussed his newborn child on the campaign trail in his congressional race in Colorado, he found himself empathizing with constituents concerned about early education for their own children. In his chats with millennials, the…

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Kwame Nkrumah

The Time for Pan-Africanism is Now!

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Africa did not gain Independence from her erstwhile colonial masters, we regained’ it! Africa was independent before they arrived! By Sebastiane Ebatamehi, The African Exponent — We can never talk enough of Kwame Nkrumah when ever the African narrative is analyzed. He is the perfect martyr, a hero unappreciated and one who despite the betrayal from a people he loved with all his heart, left behind a compass that would guide…

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In 2016, 65 black and undocumented immigrants met in Miami to build and connect with each other. The first of its kind, this convening resulted in the establishment of the UndocuBlack Network, whose goal is to advocate for and amplify the stories of undocumented black immigrants in the U.S.

Undocumented Black Migrants Build an Informal Organizing Network

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By Carla Pineda, Law at the Margins — Editor’s note: This article is part of “We the Immigrants,” a Community Based News Room (CBNR) series that examines how immigrant communities across the United States are responding to immigration policies. The five-part series is supported by a Solutions Journalism Network Renewing Democracy grant. The truth became clear to Sadat Ibrahim early. At the age of 18, he knew his life would be difficult as…

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How race influences convictions. Source:: National Registry of Exonerations.

The Deadly Peril of White Privilege

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By Earl Ofari Hutchinson, The Hutchinson Report — Now how do you explain this? Scott Paul Beierle casually strolls into Hot Yoga Tallahassee in Tallahassee, Florida and just as causally blazes away inside and when the smoke clears, two innocents are dead and a score others are wounded. Beierle is not gunned down by police but just as casually murders himself. Then explain this. Beierle was not some nameless, faceless kook,…

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Imperial Federation Map of the World showing the extent of the British Empire. The Empire in red in 1886, by Walter Crane

British Empire is still being whitewashed by the school curriculum – historian on why this must change

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By Deana Heath, The Conversation — Jeremy Corbyn has recently proposed that British school children should be taught about the history of the realities of British imperialism and colonialism. This would include the history of people of colour as components of, and contributors to, the British nation-state – rather than simply as enslaved victims of it. As Corbyn rightly noted: “Black history is British history” – and hence its study should be…

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You Can't Have Capitalism Without Racism - Malcom X.

The American Economy Is Rigged — And what we can do about it.

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NOTE: No mention of the centrality of racism and sexism the plays in “rigged” capitalism. I put rigged in quotes because it’s redundant to call capitalism rigged! Capitalism has always been rigged against the vast majority of the people: those exterminated or enslaved by capitalism’s founders and those who eventually became the proletariat all over the world. Hence, this essay is fundamentally flawed in its attempt to explain why their…

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Stacey Abrams giving the keynote speech at the Georgia State Democratic Convention in Atlanta, last August.

Stacey Abrams and the Black Women Reshaping the Left

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She and political strategists like Jessica Byrd and Kayla Reed are designing a new theory of the Democratic coalition. By Brittney Cooper, The New York Times — For too long, the Democratic Party has been comfortable with black women only running conventions or registering voters — doing background work. The party expects black women to be its backbone, as when 98 percent of black female voters in Alabama cast their ballots for…

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