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Editors’ Choice

Slave Patrol

Citizen’s Arrest: Racist at its Roots

By Editors' Choice

By Alan J. Singer, HNN — The video-recorded murder of Ahmaud Arbery, a young Black man killed by two white vigilantes while jogging near Brunswick, Georgia, has focused attention on Georgia’s Civil War era Citizen’s Arrest law. The current version of Georgia Citizen’s Arrest Law, 17-4-60 (2010), states: “A private person may arrest an offender if the offense is committed in his presence or within his immediate knowledge. If the offense is a…

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Robin Rue Simmons.

Reparations rally promotes more funding

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Bill Smith, Evanston Now — About 100 people gathered online Thursday evening to hear presentations supporting Evanston’s reparation program and calls for more funding for it. Alderman Robin Rue Simmons, 5th Ward, who heads the City Council’s reparations subcomittee, told the town hall meeting she’s seeking support from anyone interested in the program, including family foundations, major donors, institutions and individuals. Alderman Ann Rainey, 8th Ward, the third member…

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Bakari Sellers' new memoir, "My Vanishing Country," traces his life from growing up in rural Denmark, South Carolina, to his career in electoral politics and as a political analyst.

Bakari Sellers on a life shaped by the rural South’s civil rights movement

By Editors' Choice

By Olivia Paschal, Facing South — Born in 1984, former South Carolina state Rep. Bakari Sellers was raised in rural Denmark, South Carolina, to a family deeply involved in the civil rights movement. His father, educator Cleveland Sellers, was an activist with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who was incarcerated on specious charges for which he was later pardoned following the Orangeburg Massacre at South Carolina State University in 1968. State troopers shot…

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Representative Sheila Jackson Lee (D., Texas), speaking during a House committee hearing.

H.R. 40 (Reparations) Is Not a Symbolic Act. It’s a Path to Restorative Justice

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

The conversation surrounding reparations is underway and the U.S. government must take a leading role. By Sheila Jackson Lee U.S. House of Representatives For nearly three decades, my former colleague Rep. John Conyers of Michigan would introduce H.R. 40, legislation seeking to establish a commission to study and develop reparation proposals. Though many thought it a lost cause, he believed that a day would come when our nation would need to…

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Earl Bousquet

Africa must support the CARICOM Reparations demand

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

Chronicles Of A Chronic Caribbean Chronicler By Earl Bousquet — May 25th every year is still observed as ‘African Liberation Day’, as that was the date on which the Organization for African Unity (OAU) was formed in 1963 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia under the leadership of Emperor Haile Selassie. But since 2002 the OAU has been renamed the African union (AU), and with over 50 African states now fully independent,…

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People waiting for a distribution of masks and food in Harlem, New York City.

It’s Not Obesity. It’s Slavery

By Editors' Choice

We know why Covid-19 is killing so many black people. By Sabrina Strings, NYT — About five years ago, I was invited to sit in on a meeting about health in the African-American community. Several important figures in the fields of public health and economics were present. A freshly minted Ph.D., I felt strangely like an interloper. I was also the only black person in the room. One of the…

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The Left must seize the opportunity to live our politics in public

Black Voters Are Ready. Are We?

By Editors' Choice

Bernie lost with Black voters, but the Left will win if we commit to deep organizing work to earn their trust. By Phillip Agnew, In These Times — This is part of a roundtable on lessons from 2020 that the Left can use to win future presidential elections. It’s been three and a half months since the South Carolina Democratic primary. As the story goes, it was there former Vice President…

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Dr. Conrad Worrill

A Living Legend: Dr. Conrad Worrill

By Editors' Choice

By MG Media — Conrad Worrill (born August 15, 1941) is a writer, educator, activist, and former talk show host for the WVON call-in program On Target. Worrill’s activism has centered on the need for greater independence in African-American life and helping young people better understand the relationships between power and institutions. He’s still very active on the board of the Black United Fund of Illinois (BUFI) in which he’s a founder member. He has remained…

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Mailbox

Will Americans Lose Their Right to Vote in the Pandemic?

By Editors' Choice

The safest way to cast a ballot will very likely be by mail. But with opposition from the president, limited funding and time running out, will that option be available? By Emily Bazelon, NYT — In March, as a wave of states began delaying their spring primaries because of the coronavirus, Wisconsin’s election, scheduled for April 7, loomed. The ballot for that day included the presidential primary, thousands of local…

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Rev. Joseph Lowery with Rosa Parks

Undaunted Resistance: Joseph Lowery and the Spirit of SCLC

By Editors' Choice

By R. Drew Smith, AAIHS — Against all odds, a movement for racial justice took hold in mid-20th-century America, emerging from within the racially-heated South, and drawing sustenance from a rich-array of Black religious sources. A cadre of activist Black clergypersons were among the central figures in this historic social movement, with organizations such as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) epitomizing the promise of a socially-mobilized Black clergy sector. Although SCLC…

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