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Editors’ Choice

Trump’s Willie Horton Moment

Trump’s Willie Horton Moment

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By Earl Ofari Hutchinson, The Hutchinson Report — “Maybe he will put this Willie Horton on the ticket”. Lee Atwater, George Bush Sr’s 1988 presidential campaign manager wasn’t being totally facetious when he made this crack to a confidant. Horton was the black convict who escaped from a Massachusetts pen while on a work furlough. While on the lam, Horton raped a Maryland housewife. At the time, Bush was in what…

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Mailing Bombs Domestic Terrorism

Here’s Why Trump Will Never Call Mailing Bombs Domestic Terrorism

By | Editors' Choice

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson, The Hutchinson Report — Trump talked about peace, harmony and all sides coming together but did not once mention the two words that if ever applied to sending suspected mail bomb packages to leading Democrats. The words are “domestic terrorism.” Trump didn’t use those words and he was called on the carpet by a few for not using them. However, this is not just a case…

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Trumpism Is ‘Identity Politics’ for White People

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The president’s closing argument in the midterm elections lays bare the logic of his appeal. By Adam Serwer, The Atlantic — After Democrats lost the 2016 presidential election, a certain conventional wisdom congealed within the pundit class: Donald Trump’s success was owed to the Democratic abandonment of the white working class and the party’s emphasis on identity politics. By failing to emphasize a strong economic message, the thinking went, the party had…

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Civil rights organizations have sued Georgia’s Republican secretary of state for failing to register 53,000 new voters, most of them black. Reuters/Christopher Aluka Berry

Georgia election fight shows that black voter suppression, a southern tradition, still flourishes

By | Editors' Choice

Georgia’s refusal to process 53,000 voter registrations, mostly filed by African-Americans, is the latest in a long history of black voter suppression in the South, from poll taxes to literacy tests. By Frederick Knight, The Conversation — Georgia’s Republican Secretary of State Brian Kemp has been sued for suppressing minority votes after an Associated Press investigation revealed a month before November’s midterm election that his office has not approved 53,000 voter registrations – most…

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How 2018 Became the ‘Year of the Black Progressive’

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White Democrats are becoming more liberal; black Democrats aren’t. That fact is driving black candidates to win by executing a savvy strategy. By Theodore R. Johnson, Politico Magazine — It’s too soon to award the moniker, but 2018 may well be remembered as the political “Year of the Black Progressive,” much as 1992 was the “Year of the Woman.” Black women are taking office as mayors in major cities such…

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The crowd at a get-out-the-vote rally during a speech by Michelle Obama, Miami, Florida, September 2018

Fighting to Vote

By | Editors' Choice

By Michael Tomasky, The New York Review — The Embattled Vote in America: From the Founding to the Present by Allan J. Lichtman Harvard University Press, 315 pp., $27.95 If you grew up, as I did, in the 1960s and 1970s, watching (albeit through a child’s eyes) the civil rights movement notch victory after victory, you could be forgiven for thinking at the time that that happy condition was normal.…

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James Forten

This Black Activist Was One of the Richest Men in Early America

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A Black sailmaker was helping to lead the anti-slavery movement long before it was popular in America. By Sean Braswell, OZY — In the spring of 1842, several thousand Philadelphians poured into the streets for one of the largest funerals in the city’s history. It was a remarkable sight: An interracial procession that included everyone from poor Black laborers to wealthy White merchants to sea captains and shippers. On that…

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Technology

Digital colonialism on the African continent

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JOHANNESBURG – Earlier colonialists came by boats to “the new world” and expanded their empires by building railroads, farms and infrastructure. Today’s colonialists are digital; they implement communication infrastructures such as social media in order to harvest data and turn it into money. This threatens the upcoming democracies in Africa, as they experience explosions of fake news and misinformation with tribal violence and democratic unrest as dire consequences.

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Democratic candidate for Georgia governor Stacey Abrams waves to supporters at an election-night party, May 22, 2018.

How Democrats Fail by Ignoring Candidates Of Color

By | Editors' Choice

New candidates will create opportunities for Democrats across the country—if the establishment is willing to back them. By Steve Phillips, The Nation — Old wineskins must make room for new wine.” During the Rainbow Coalition days of the 1980s, Jesse Jackson used that biblical reference to press the Democratic Party to make structural and strategic changes in order to seize the opportunities presented by the country’s demographic revolution. Today, this…

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Republicans Have a Secret Weapon in the Midterms: Voter Suppression

By | Editors' Choice

After losing in 2012, the GOP enacted the harshest limits on voting since Jim Crow. It could make the difference this year from Florida to North Dakota. By Jay Michaelson, Daily Beast — With Democrats furious over Donald Trump, and many Republicans furious over the treatment of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, the 2018 elections are likely to see the highest turnout of midterm voters in recent history. But those voters will be confronted by…

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