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Editors’ Choice

Diepsloot in South Africa

South Africa: The fault-lines of the world’s most unequal society

By Editors' Choice

By John Allen, All Africa — Cape Town — Amid the explosive cocktail of ingredients which contributed to the outbreak of looting and burning in South Africa this week, new fault-lines running through a society divided by class as well as by race were on display as never before. The unrest may have been triggered by the jailing of former president Jacob Zuma and exacerbated by factors ranging from orchestrated…

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Marcus Rashford and Jadon Sancho

Racism is setting impossible standards for athletes of color

By Editors' Choice

By Peniel E. Joseph — Two recent examples of the transatlantic dimensions of racial intolerance in sports — an arena that, along with politics, often triggers increasingly vitriolic abuse in the age of social media — are a sobering reminder: Racism is a global crisis that is often resistant to progress and fighting it requires constant vigilance. Five years after Black players, many with immigrant African roots, helped France’s men’s soccer…

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Speech bubble mirror

There is no debate over critical race theory

By Editors' Choice

Pundits and politicians have created their own definition for the term, and then set about attacking it. By Ibram X. Kendi, The Atlantic — The United States is not in the midst of a “culture war” over race and racism. The animating force of our current conflict is not our differing values, beliefs, moral codes, or practices. The American people aren’t divided. The American people are being divided. Republican operatives have buried the…

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Smash the Blockade - Cuba

Washington’s weaponization of protests in Cuba takes its regime change efforts to new heights of hypocrisy

By Editors' Choice

By Peter Bolton, CounterPunch — On 11 July, Cuba saw thousands of demonstrators take to the streets in cities across the island. The protests are believed to have started in the Artemisa Province before spreading to neighboring Havana and further afield, including Cuba’s second-largest city, Santiago de Cuba. Press reports largely claim that protesters are motivated by shortages and the government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic. Needless to say, the…

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Recent solidarity protest in San Francisco.

The assassination of Jovenel Moise: What next for Haiti?

By Editors' Choice

By Seth Donnelly, CounterPunch — Today, the people of Haiti are facing down the US-backed dictatorship of the ruling Haitian Tet Kale Party (PHTK) that came to power through the fraudulent election of Michel Martelly in 2010 and maintained its grip on power through the fraudulent election of Jovenel Moise in 2016, what Haitian activists refer to as electoral coup d’etats. Both elections were held under UN occupation and sponsored by the US government. As…

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Sen. John Barrasso, Senate Minority Whip Sen. John Thune, Sen. Rick Scott and Senate Minority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell

GOP-led voter suppression is being implemented step by step — Just like Jim Crow

By Editors' Choice

Five generations after the original Jim Crow edifice was built, the GOP has dedicated itself to mass disenfranchisement. By Sasha Abramsky, Truthout — Around the country, Republican legislators are using straw man arguments about voter fraud to push increasing restrictions on access to the ballot box. In response, President Joe Biden and others have slammed the changes as “un-American,” rhetorically downplaying the violence of voter suppression that has in fact been at…

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Zaila Avant-garde

Zaila Avant-garde becomes first Black American winner of Scripps National Spelling Bee

By Editors' Choice

Zaila, a 14-year-old from Harvey, La., won on the word “Murraya.” She became the first Black American to win the Scripps National Spelling Bee in almost 100 years of contests. By Maria Cramer and Alan Yuhas, NYT — The national spelling bee has been held for almost 100 years, and for decades, its organizers have steadily made the words more difficult, veering into the realms of medicine, art, zoology and…

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Haitian police patrol outside the presidential residence in Port-au-Prince

Foreign governments and NGOs will try to exploit Moïse’s assassination

By Editors' Choice

As citizens of one of the Western Hemisphere’s earliest democracies, Haitians must be left to decide their own destiny. By Cécile Accilien, Nedghie Adrien, Randal Maurice Jelks & Nathan Jérémie-Brink — The abhorrent assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse has exposed the political instability long plaguing the Caribbean nation. If history is instructive, how this event is reported will also have deep consequences that may make matters worse. Corporate media…

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Young Black child in class.

The critical race theory panic is a new weapon in the right-wing war on public education

By Editors' Choice

By Jeff Bryant, Independent Media Institute — No one deserves the school I went to,” says Celia Gottlieb. Gottlieb is currently enrolled in Middlebury College and working as an intern with New York University’s Metro Center, but she is talking about the high school she attended in Highland, New York, a small community in the Lower Hudson River Valley region of the Empire State. The Highland Central School District would…

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Haitian police patrol outside the presidential residence in Port-au-Prince on July 7, 2021, after President Jovenel Moïse was assassinated

Haiti’s president assassinated: 5 essential reads to give you key history and insight

By Editors' Choice

Expert background on Haiti, where President Jovenel Moïse’s July 7 killing is the latest in the Caribbean nation’s long list of struggles. By Catesby Holmes, The Conversation — The assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse risks destabilizing the Caribbean country, which was already in crisis over alarmingly high violence and Moïse’s increasingly undemocratic behavior. Here’s some essential background on Haiti, starting with the painful history that underlies so much of Haiti’s modern…

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Frederick Douglass, 1850.

What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? By Frederick Douglass

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass gave a speech at an event commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence, held at Rochester’s Corinthian Hall. —— Mr. President, Friends and Fellow Citizens: He who could address this audience without a quailing sensation, has stronger nerves than I have. I do not remember ever to have appeared as a speaker before any assembly more shrinkingly, nor with greater distrust of my…

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Tiffany Crutcher and her father during their meeting with President Joe Biden in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Tiffany Crutcher: What I Told President Biden in Tulsa

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

As a descendant of the Tulsa Race Massacre, I made the case for reparations. By Tiffany Crutcher, The Progressive — On June 1, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, President Joe Biden visited Tulsa’s historically Black Greenwood neighborhood. No other U.S. President had visited the site of one of the worst eruptions of racial violence in U.S. history, and Black people in Tulsa and around the nation anticipated…

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