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Editors’ Choice

Redlining: The Origin Story of Institutional Racism

Redlining: The Origin Story of Institutional Racism

By | Editors' Choice

 By Michael Harriot, The Root — Money is a social construct. We accept the idea that a dollar issued by the U.S. government is worth more than Monopoly money. Even if our currency were backed by gold, the precious metal is only valuable because we have collectively agreed to its worth. The American idea of race, specifically whiteness, is an economic construct. From the beginning, it has existed in…

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Taking Reparations Seriously - Understanding what the conversation about reparations is, and isn't, about.

Taking Reparations Seriously

By | Editors' Choice, Reparations

Understanding what the conversation about reparations is, and isn’t, about. By Richard North Patterson, The Bulwark — In 2014, Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote his seminal essay “The Case For Reparations.” Five years later we are talking about reparations again. This presents a fresh opportunity for Americans at large—liberals, conservatives and everyone of goodwill—to thoughtfully consider the ways in which systemic racial injustice has warped our social fabric. For the stark reality is that…

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Charles J. Ogletree poses for a portrait following a celebratory symposium honoring the Harvard law professor at Wasserstein Hall on the Harvard Law School campus Oct. 2.

Civil rights attorney Charles Ogletree’s mind is a weapon. Now, it’s fighting him.

By | Editors' Choice

By Keith L. Alexander — This article was originally published by The Washington Post in December of 2017 CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Blocks away from Harvard Law School, renowned civil rights attorney and law professor Charles J. Ogletree Jr. was at home with family, readying himself for a celebration in his honor. As his wife, children and grandchildren rushed around picking out outfits and fixing their hair that October day, Ogletree gave…

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Ruth Wilson Gilmore

Is Prison Necessary? Ruth Wilson Gilmore Might Change Your Mind

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In three decades of advocating for prison abolition, the activist and scholar has helped transform how people think about criminal justice. By Rachel Kushner, New York Times — There’s an anecdote that Ruth Wilson Gilmore likes to share about being at an environmental-justice conference in Fresno in 2003. People from all over California’s Central Valley had gathered to talk about the serious environmental hazards their communities faced, mostly as a…

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The ExxonMobil refinery in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is part of a large concentration of chemical and oil companies known as "Cancer Alley." A new report finds that the fossil fuel industry is denying the reality of air and water pollution, or even shifting the blame for this pollution to those disadvantaged communities who are suffering the impacts of the industry's projects.

NAACP Reveals Tactics Fossil Fuel Industry Uses to Manipulate Communities of Color

By | Editors' Choice

By Ben Jervey, DeSmogBlog — The fossil fuel industry regularly deploys manipulative and dishonest tactics when engaging with communities of color, often working to co-opt the respect and authority of minority-led groups to serve corporate goals. That is according to a new report, “Fossil Fueled Foolery,” published today by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), which outlines the top 10 manipulation tactics that the group’s members and…

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Press Freedom

Civil Society, Press Freedom & Human Rights Under Attack in Africa

By | Editors' Choice

By Thalif Deen, IPS — UNITED NATIONS, Apr 12 2019 (IPS) – The civic space in several African countries, including Tanzania, Burundi, Zambia, Sudan, Mozambique, Somalia and Eritrea, is gradually shrinking – and mostly under authoritarian leaders and repressive regimes. The attacks are directed largely against human rights and civil society organizations (CSOs)— and specifically against the news media. The UN Human Rights Office in Burundi was closed down last February…

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IBW21.org Post Featured Image FPO

Decriminalizing the Drug War?

By | Editors' Choice, War on the “War on Drugs” Posts

Calculating the Damage from a Century of Drug Prohibition. By Alfred W. McCoy, TomDispatch — We live in a time of change, when people are questioning old assumptions and seeking new directions. In the ongoing debate over health care, social justice, and border security, there is, however, one overlooked issue that should be at the top of everyone’s agenda, from Democratic Socialists to libertarian Republicans: America’s longest war. No, not…

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‘The neo-Nazi terror group National Action has called for a ‘white jihad’.’ A National Action march in Darlington, County Durham.

White supremacy feeds on mainstream encouragement. That has to stop

By | Editors' Choice

Rather than making concessions to bigots, politicians must confront them. It’s the only way to end the violence. By Gary Younge, The Guardian — On 19 April 1995, Timothy McVeigh blew up the Alfred P Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring another 684, in the deadliest act of domestic US terrorism to date. A white supremacist, among other things, he was radicalised by what he…

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Hans Sloane collected this specimen of cacao in Jamaica in the 1680s. Sloane often collected on or near slave plantations, taking advantage of slavery’s infrastructure to advance his science.

Historians Expose Early Scientists’ Debt to the Slave Trade

By | Editors' Choice, Reparations

By examining scientific papers, correspondence between naturalists, and the records of slaving companies, historians are now seeing new connections between science and slavery and piecing together just how deeply intertwined they were. By Sam Kean, Science Magazine — At the dawn of the 1700s, European science seemed poised to conquer all of nature. Isaac Newton had recently published his monumental theory of gravity. Telescopes were opening up the heavens to…

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The Second Pan-African Congress, Palais Mondial, Brussels, September 1921.

Is a United States of Africa Possible?

By | Editors' Choice

Is a united Africa, freed from the legacy of colonialism, possible? The Pan-African movement has been advocated by many different voices, underpinned by a belief in the common destiny of the peoples of Africa. By Hakim Adi, History Today — It is more than 60 years since the All-African Peoples Conference convened in Accra, Ghana in 1958. It was a notable event in the history of Pan-Africanism. Organised by two…

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