Category

Editors’ Choice

U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn

SC’s Clyburn pans reparations, ‘opportunity zones’ as unable to address racial inequality

By | Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Jamie Lovegrove, Post and Courier — SUMMERVILLE — The highest ranking African-American member of Congress has major problems with two prominent ideas to address racial disparities in the economy: one that comes from his fellow Democrats and another championed by a Republican African-American senator from his home state. In an interview, House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn teed off on both reparations and “opportunity zones,” complaining that the former is…

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Sens. Cory Booker and Bernie Sanders, seen at a South Carolina NAACP march in January, are two of the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates pressed on the issue of reparations this week.,

We Absolutely Could Give Reparations To Black People. Here’s How.

By | Editors' Choice

By Julia Craven, Huffington Post — Let’s say you’re driving down the street and someone rear-ends you. You get out of your car to assess the damage. The person who hit your vehicle gets out of his car, apologizes for the damage and calls his insurance company. Eventually, you receive a check for the harm done. Now, let’s say that for years, if not generations, your family and families like…

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African American slave family representing five generations all born on the plantation of J. J. Smith, Beaufort, South Carolina.

A Realistic Expectation of Reparations for Blacks

By | Editors' Choice, Reparations

A direct cost of slavery is the cost of African-American life. How much is a life worth depends on a lot of personal factors. By Benny Williams, Ebony — Reparations owed to African-Americans in terms of dollars are insurmountable and nearly impossible for America to afford. No amount of money can repair the psychological damage African-Americans have experienced for centuries, and no amount of money can address the systemic racism that…

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Marielle Franco

It’s Carnaval in Brazil—What ‘Marielle Presente’ Means for Women of Color Across the Globe

By | Editors' Choice

The name and image of Marielle Franco—an intersectional representation of the many wars being fought—serves as more than just a reminder. By Tanya Rawal-Jindia — March 14 will mark the first anniversary of Brazilian politician Marielle Franco’s assassination—but on Sunday, the second day of São Paulo Carnaval, her legacy as a powerful and empowering black, gay, single mother was celebrated without apology. For women of color in Brazil and beyond,…

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Albert Woodfox was released from prison in 2016 after more than four decades.

After 40 years in solitary, activist Albert Woodfox tells his story of survival

By | Editors' Choice

The former Black Panther and member of the Angola 3 reflects on how he turned his cell from a place of confinement to a space for personal growth. By Albert Woodfox, The Guardian — My wrists were handcuffed to my waist by a leather strap. These restraints would become standard for me for decades to come. They walked me to a car and I got in. A captain next to…

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William A. Darity Jr.

Forty Acres and a Mule in the 21st Century by William A. Darity, Jr.

By | Editors' Choice, Reparations

William A. Darity, Jr., Duke University — In general, a program of reparations is intended to achieve three objectives: acknowledgment of a grievous injustice, redress for the injustice, and closure of the grievances held by the group subjected to the injustice. Three types of injustices motivate a program of reparations for black Americans: slavery, the nearly centurylong Jim Crow regime following Reconstruction, and ongoing discrimination. Inauguration of a reparations program on…

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Lotte Dula shows her great-great grandfather's slave ledger.

Denver activists make reparations hoping for racial justice and reconciliation

By | Editors' Choice, Reparations

By: Micah Smith, The Denver Channel — DENVER — Throughout Denver, there’s a growing racial justice movement focused on reparations and reconciliation. Most of those involved in this push to bridge the racial divide have been encouraged to do so after discovering a dark part of their family history. While going through some old family records, retired financial strategist Lotte Lieb Dula discovered her great-great grandfather’s leather-bound notebook that held a…

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The 32ND African Union (AU) Heads of State and Government Summit

Declaration on the AU Recognition of the 400th Anniversary of the Transatlantic Slave Trade

By | Editors' Choice

32nd Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the African Union, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia   WE, Heads of State and Government of the African Union, assembled on 11 February 2019 at our 32nd Ordinary Session in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Evoking the unity of all African peoples, bound together by neighbourliness, cultural affinity, historical experiences, our common struggles for independence and dignity, our civilizational heritage, and our common destiny with all peoples…

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Voters register at a polling station in Manhattan, New York, on November 6, 2018.

Flat Broke, Black Voters Want More Than Just Another Black President

By | Editors' Choice

By Jon Jeter, Truthout — Sen. Cory Booker’s announcement on February 1 that he is entering the 2020 presidential race brings the number of African-American Democrats seeking their party’s nomination to two, making the crowded primary field the “most diverse in history,” according to The New York Times. But while The New York Times, cable news and other liberal pundits exult in the White House bids of Booker and California’s junior U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, African…

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Jay Speights, an interfaith leader who lives in Rockville, Md., made an accidental discovery last year: He is an African prince.

‘I’m a prince’: After years of searching for family history, a pastor discovers royal ties to Africa

By | Editors' Choice

By Marissa J. Lang, The Washington Post — It was about 4 a.m. when his phone buzzed with a message from far away. He read it once, twice, three times before he woke his sleeping wife to tell her the news. “I’m a prince,” he whispered as she blinked herself awake. “A prince.” Jay Speights, an interfaith pastor from Rockville, Md., could hardly believe the words as he formed them…

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