Category

Editors’ Choice

Chadwick Boseman

Chadwick Boseman’s genius was to embody black pride, in all its forms

By Editors' Choice

The actor reflected the ownership of self that white America still has a hard time embracing, says film critic Elvis Mitchell By Elvis Mitchell, The Guardian — For African-Americans, always braced for news about our own being taken from us early, the unexpected impact of Chadwick Boseman’s death, from colon cancer – and the shoulder-to-the-grindstone dignity of his decision to work through his illness and keep it quiet – encapsulated…

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I Can’t Breathe! — The Black Lives Matter movement from a Barbados/Caribbean perspective

By Editors' Choice

A multi-dimension film that explores the Black Lives Matter movement from a Barbados/Caribbean perspective. Featuring: Eddy Grant Anthony “Gabby” Carter David Comissiong Robert “Bobby” Clarke Trevor Marshall Luci Hammans Alex Downes Peter “Adonijah” Alleyne Aida Gerbremariam Riddim Tribe Dance Collective Produced/Choreographed by: Aisha Comissiong

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Public Enemy: Flavor Flav and Chuck D

Public Enemy Officially Releases “Fight The Power Remix 2020” Feat. Nas, Black Thought, & Rapsody

By Editors' Choice

By Dimas Sanfiorenzo, okayplayer — Public Enemy has officially released “Fight the Power Remix 2020.” The group also announced a reunion with Def Jam. Full circle. Public Enemy has announced the title and release date for their new album, What You Gonna Do When The Grid Goes Down. They also announced more exciting news: the album will be releasing on Def Jam Records, the label the iconic group started their career on. What…

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Theodore Roosevelt was one of many U.S. presidents who was racist.

Presidents have a long history of condescension, indifference and outright racism towards Black Americans

By Editors' Choice

President Woodrow Wilson told Black leaders, ‘Segregation is not a humiliation but a benefit, and ought to be so regarded by you gentlemen.’ He was one in a long line of racist American presidents. By Stephen A. Jones and Eric Freedman — The fury over racial injustice that erupted in the wake of George Floyd’s killing has forced Americans to confront their history. That’s unfamiliar territory for most Americans, whose…

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In Wilkerson’s view, racism is only the visible manifestation of something deeper, a hidden system of social domination.

Isabel Wilkerson’s World-Historical Theory of Race and Caste

By Editors' Choice

By comparing white supremacy in the U.S. to the caste system in India, her new book at once illuminates and collapses a complex history. By Sunil Khilnani, The New Yorker — As the summer of 1958 was coming to an end, Martin Luther King, Jr., was newly famous and exhausted. All of twenty-nine years old, he had been travelling across the country for weeks promoting his first book, “Stride Toward…

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Pharrell Williams: America's Past and Present Are Racist. We Deserve a Black Future

Pharrell Williams: America’s Past and Present Are Racist. We Deserve a Black Future

By Editors' Choice

America’s past was shaped by slavery. To live up to American’s ideals, we must trust in a Black vision of the future, Pharrell Williams writes. Pharrell Williams with Michael Harriot, TIME — On April 26, 1607, three ships carrying 105 men and boys landed on the eastern shore of what would come to be called America. They called themselves “adventurers.” But they had no interest in liberty or justice, and…

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Five You Should Know: African American Suffragists

By Editors' Choice, People You Should Know

The women’s suffrage movement had many heroines who bravely fought for the rights of women in the United States. Here are the stories of five African American suffragists who helped women in America secure the right to vote. Source: NMAAHC — Mary Ann Shadd Cary (1823-1893) Mary Ann Shadd Cary was born in 1823 to parents dedicated to the abolition of slavery. Her parents taught her much about fighting for…

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Clockwise from top left: Police officers in Minneapolis; two Camden County, N.J., police vehicles; an officer at a Minneapolis gas station; and Sister Chabree Muhammad, with kids in Camden in July.

Police Reform: Here’s How America Should Rethink Safety

By Editors' Choice

America’s Policing System Is Broken. It’s Time to Radically Rethink Public Safety. By Josiah Bates and Karl Vick, TIME — In Minneapolis, the first days after George Floyd’s killing exist in memory as kind of a blur. Even so, the burning of the Third Precinct police station on May 28 was a signal event, and not only for residents of the south side, where Floyd was killed and so many buildings went…

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Mel Foote, President of the Washington DC, based Constituency for Africa

CFA President Mel Foote — Africa Has Not Been A Priority Region For The Trump Administration

By Editors' Choice

President Trump really has not had any discernible agenda for Africa, says Mel Foote. By Ajong Mbapndah L, Pan African Vision — Very little has been done by President Trump in articulating and fostering a concise African policy, says Mel Foote, President of the Washington DC, based Constituency for Africa. In addition to not paying a visit to Africa in his first term, the President’s utterances and actions have not…

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A “redlining” map of Richmond, Virginia, from 1937

Racial Inequities Will Grow Unless We Consciously Work to Eliminate Them

By Editors' Choice

To lessen and reverse the pandemic’s effects on Black families’ income and wealth, consciously consider the persistent effects of the country’s legacy of human trafficking, bondage, and disadvantage. By Kilolo Kijakazi, Jonathan Schwabish and Margaret Simms — The economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic promises to affect families across the United States and future generations for years to come. The downturn will likely hit African Americans hardest, exacerbating large, long-standing racial wealth gaps. Because these…

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