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Editors’ Choice

Young Black child in class.

The critical race theory panic is a new weapon in the right-wing war on public education

By Editors' Choice

By Jeff Bryant, Independent Media Institute — No one deserves the school I went to,” says Celia Gottlieb. Gottlieb is currently enrolled in Middlebury College and working as an intern with New York University’s Metro Center, but she is talking about the high school she attended in Highland, New York, a small community in the Lower Hudson River Valley region of the Empire State. The Highland Central School District would…

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Haitian police patrol outside the presidential residence in Port-au-Prince on July 7, 2021, after President Jovenel Moïse was assassinated

Haiti’s president assassinated: 5 essential reads to give you key history and insight

By Editors' Choice

Expert background on Haiti, where President Jovenel Moïse’s July 7 killing is the latest in the Caribbean nation’s long list of struggles. By Catesby Holmes, The Conversation — The assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse risks destabilizing the Caribbean country, which was already in crisis over alarmingly high violence and Moïse’s increasingly undemocratic behavior. Here’s some essential background on Haiti, starting with the painful history that underlies so much of Haiti’s modern…

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Frederick Douglass, 1850.

What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? By Frederick Douglass

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass gave a speech at an event commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence, held at Rochester’s Corinthian Hall. —— Mr. President, Friends and Fellow Citizens: He who could address this audience without a quailing sensation, has stronger nerves than I have. I do not remember ever to have appeared as a speaker before any assembly more shrinkingly, nor with greater distrust of my…

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Tiffany Crutcher and her father during their meeting with President Joe Biden in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Tiffany Crutcher: What I Told President Biden in Tulsa

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

As a descendant of the Tulsa Race Massacre, I made the case for reparations. By Tiffany Crutcher, The Progressive — On June 1, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, President Joe Biden visited Tulsa’s historically Black Greenwood neighborhood. No other U.S. President had visited the site of one of the worst eruptions of racial violence in U.S. history, and Black people in Tulsa and around the nation anticipated…

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Ambassador Irwin LaRocque

CARICOM: Transition and reflection

By Editors' Choice

By Elizabeth Morgan, Jamaica Gleaner — The coming week is significant for the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) as Sunday, July 4 is officially CARICOM Day marking 48 years since the signing of the Treaty of Chaguaramas in Trinidad and Tobago on July 4, 1973, creating the Community. On Monday, July 5, CARICOM will mark another anniversary, the 20th year since the signing of the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas (RTC) on July…

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Michelle Bachelet, U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights

The U.N. Rights Chief Says Reparations Are Needed For People Facing Racism

By Editors' Choice

By The Associated Press — The U.N. human rights chief, in a landmark report launched after the killing of George Floyd in the United States, is urging countries worldwide to do more to help end discrimination, violence and systemic racism against people of African descent and “make amends” to them — including through reparations. The report from Michelle Bachelet, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, offers a sweeping look…

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Mayor Baraka launches ambitious two-year economic recovery plan with $8.8 million first year budget.

Mayor Baraka launches ambitious two-year economic recovery plan with $8.8 million first year budget

By Editors' Choice

Investment will focus on small businesses, equitable development, and neighborhoods; Funding comes from 2021 American Rescue Plan legislation to create affordable commercial space. Mayor Ras J. Baraka announced last week that Newark is launching an ambitious two-year economic recovery program at a press conference at Kleen Kutz Unisex Beauty Salon at 1011 Bergen Street. The program will help small businesses like Kleen Kutz connect to grants, technical assistance and other…

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Hilton Head, South Carolina, 1862.

The Demand of Freedom

By Editors' Choice

The United States’ first civil rights movement. By Kellie Carter Jackson — Racism is not regional. I often hear people refer to it as though it were trapped in the South. White Northerners who are appalled by the blatant racism around them will say things like “This isn’t Mississippi” or “Take that attitude back to Alabama.” But whether white Northerners like to recognize it or not, slavery was in every…

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Cynthia Kain and Gunnar Eggertsson

What the Pandemic Has Stolen from Black America

By Editors' Choice

By Perter Jamison, The Washington Post — The boy is perhaps 8 or 9 years old. In the black-and-white photo, his face is frozen in an open-mouthed grin, his small arms tucked respectfully behind his back. He stands alone, a Black child in dark slacks and a light, collared shirt. Pine trees rise in the blurry background, dark slashes against an overexposed sky. The second boy, who holds the photograph,…

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The American Red Cross Disaster Relief Headquarters in Tulsa, 1921

Sport as a Place of Violence in the Tulsa Race Massacre

By Editors' Choice

By J. Paul — On Tuesday May 31, 1921, the Oklahoma City Indians baseball team took to the field against the Tulsa Oilers for an afternoon doubleheader. The first game, beginning at 2:00 pm, resulted in a 2-1 victory for the Oklahoma City (OKC) Indians. Then, after a short rest period between games, the Tulsa Oilers rallied for a 6-5 victory that lasted two hours and stretched into the tenth inning.1…

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Kehinde Andrews

UK’s First Black Studies Professor Calls on African Diaspora to Unite

By Editors' Choice

As Black and African people, our power is in organizing ourselves globally, says Black radical scholar Kehinde Andrews. By Lamont Lilly, Truthout — As Black Lives Matter continues to flourish in the United States and beyond, many activists within the movement are calling for renewed internationalism and collaboration among people across the African Diaspora. In this exclusive interview, author, activist and Black radical scholar Kehinde Andrews issues the call: “We…

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Survivors and siblings Viola Fletcher and Hughes Van Ellis attend the soil dedication at Stone Hill

Tulsa massacre: Biden urges Americans to reflect on ‘deep roots of racial terror’

By Editors' Choice

President’s speech marks 100 years since the mass killing as part of a day of remembrance for the hundreds of Black victims. By Edward Helmore In a speech marking 100 years since the Tulsa race massacre, Joe Biden called on Americans to think upon “the deep roots of racial terror” in the United States and to destroy systemic racism in their society. In hard-hitting words as part of a declaration of…

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