Dr. Ron Daniels, President of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Dr. Ron Daniels

President

Veteran social and political activist Dr. Ron Daniels was an independent candidate for President of the United States in 1992. He served as Executive Director of the National Rainbow Coalition in 1987 and Southern Regional Coordinator and Deputy Campaign Manager for the Jesse Jackson for President Campaign in 1988. He holds a B.A. in History from Youngstown State University, an M.A. in Political Science from the Rockefeller School of Public Affairs in Albany, New York and a Doctor of Philosophy in Africana Studies from the Union Institute and University in Cincinnati. He currently serves as Distinguished Lecturer at York College, City University of New York.

From 1993-2005 Dr. Daniels served as first African American Executive Director of the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) During his tenure CCR emerged as a major force fighting against police brutality and misconduct, church burnings, hate crimes, voter disenfranchisement, environmental racism and the threats to civil liberties posed by the government’s response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack.

In June of 1995, Dr. Daniels led an African American fact finding and support delegation/mission to Haiti. As a result of the visit, the Haiti Support Project (HSP) was created to mobilize ongoing political and material support for the struggle for democracy and development in Haiti. HSP has emerged as the leading African American organization working to build a constituency for Haiti in the U.S.

A prolific essayist and commentator, Dr. Daniels’ column Vantage Point appears in numerous Black and progressive newspapers and web sites nationwide. He is also an occasional radio talk show host who Guest Hosts the WWRL Morning Show, 1600 AM in New York, The Warren Ballentine Show, Keeping It Real with Rev. Al Sharpton on the Radio One Network and, Make It Plain with Mark Thompson on SIRIUS/XM Satellite Radio.

Dr. Daniels is Founder and President of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century [www.ibw21.org], a progressive, African centered, action oriented Resource Center dedicated to empowering people of African descent and marginalized communities.

Rick Adams, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Rick Adams

Chairman

Richard “Rick” Adams is Assistant Vice President for the Frieda G. Shapira Center for Learning Through Service at the Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC). He has worked at CCAC since 1985. For 10 years he worked as a community organizer for Operation Better Block Inc.

He is currently president of Primary Care Health Services Inc. (PCHS) which operates 13 ambulatory care centers in Allegheny County. Rick is a Chairman of the Board of Directors of The Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW). He is Co-Convener of the Western Pennsylvania Black Political Assembly and serves as a board member of the African American Leadership Association (AALA), Urban Innovation 21, Homewood Renaissance and Urban Youth Action (UYA)

Through a life long commitment to community service he has served variously as a member of the Pittsburgh Human Relations Commission, an elected member of the Pittsburgh School Board, a radio talk show host for over 15 years and writes a periodic Cyber column entitled Just A Thought….

In 1988 Rick was the campaign manager for the Western Pennsylvania Jesse Jackson Campaign for President and served as state chair and a national Board member of the RainbowPUSH Coalition. He has run for public office several times including an independent campaign for the Pittsburgh City Council where he came in second with 31% of the vote in a November General election.

Rick is a lifelong resident of Pittsburgh’s east end. A graduate from the city’s Westinghouse High School, he received a B.A. from Bowdoin College with a double major in Government and Afro-American Studies and earned a Masters of Arts in Business Communications from Jones International University.

Don Rojas, Director of Communications for the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW)

Don Rojas

Director of Communications

Don Rojas is the Director of Communications for the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW) and also a member of its board of directors. Before joining IBW in 2013, Mr. Rojas served as Executive Director and CEO of Free Speech TV, a Denver-based, multiplatform, national media network.

Miscellaneous Accomplishments:

  • Mr. Rojas possesses a unique combination of communications expertise and experiences spanning a long career in print, broadcast and Internet media as well as international diplomacy. Over the course of his career he has traveled and worked extensively in the USA, Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • He was the former press secretary to the late Prime Minister Maurice Bishop of Grenada from 1979-1983 and the first press secretary to any Caribbean head of state.
  • He led the New York Amsterdam News as its executive editor in the early 1990s. The Amsterdam News is the largest and most influential African-American newspaper in the nation.
  • He was the general manger of Pacifica Radio station WBAI in New York from 2002-2005 and led the station to record membership drives.
  • He established a communications department for the NAACP (National HQ) in the early 1990s and became the first director of communications for the country’s oldest and largest civil rights organization.
  • He was recently featured in a chapter in the book “The Black Digital Elite—African American Leaders of the Information Revolution” by John Barber. The book contains chapters of other black media pioneers such as Richard Parsons, CEO of Time-Warner, Robert L. Johnson, founder of BET and William Kennard, former chairman of the FCC.
  • In 1999 he was named one of the ‘Silicon Alley Dozen’, a group of Internet CEOs pioneering new media developments in New York City.
  • In 1996 Mr. Rojas launched and ran The Black World Today, a pioneering news and commentary site on the Web.
  • In the mid 1990s he was contracted by the National Council of Churches (NCC) to co-ordinate a very successful media campaign to draw the nation’s and the world’s attention to a spate of hate-motivated arsons of dozens of African-American churches throughout the southern states of the USA.  The campaign resulted in scores of stories, commentaries and editorials in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and other leading newspapers and on all the major television networks. The media campaign also resulted in the NCC’s ability to raise millions of dollars from the public to assist in the rebuilding of the destroyed churches and led to the strengthening of federal and state laws against hate crimes.
  • He has interviewed presidents and prime ministers of African, Caribbean and Latin American countries as well as civil and human rights leaders in the USA and around the world.
  • He was the only African-American journalist to cover the first summit meeting between Presidents Reagan and Gorbachev in Geneva in 1986.
  • Created the first Internet Radio Network (Black World Radio) targeting people of color with news, commentaries and musical entertainment.
  • Taught courses and lectured on the history of journalism and on minorities in the media at Long Island University’s School of Journalism, the University of the West Indies and Charles University in Prague. Lectured on Caribbean and Central American politics at Columbia University in New York, McGill University in Canada, London University, the University of Manchester in England and the Sorbonne in France.
  • He assisted the President of IBW, Dr. Ron Daniels, in organizing and then participated in a historic Symposium in Washington DC in October, 2013 on the subject of “Democracy & Development in Africa and the Caribbean.”
  • Mr. Rojas has edited four books of history and critical commentary about Grenada.

Ronald E. Hampton, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Ronald E. Hampton

Washington, DC Representative
Blacks in Law Enforcement of America

Ronald E. Hampton is the Washington, DC Representative for Blacks in Law Enforcement of America. He is former Executive Director of the National Black Police Association and a retired twenty-three veteran of the DC Metropolitan Police Department. Additionally, he serves as a Law Enforcement Fellow at the University of the District of Columbia’s Institute for Public Safety and Justice.

Mr. Hampton is reputed for his outstanding work with the citizens of the Third Police District in Washington, D.C. in crime prevention and community participation and relations. Due to his extensive experience and knowledge in community relations and policing he has been afforded education and training opportunities locally, nationally, and internationally. Additionally, he was involved in designing and delivering community policing and problem solving training for residents in public housing, as well as overseeing a project dealing with intervention and crime prevention through alternative community sentencing. In 1996, Mr. Hampton led a People to People, Citizens’ Ambassador Program Law Enforcement Delegation of 23 to South African.

Over the years Mr. Hampton has worked with the U.S. Department of Justice, the American University’s Washington Semester School Criminal Justice Program and Amnesty International USA on a range of criminal justice and human rights issues. Also, he has serves as a consultant-educator to the Carter Center of Emory University Human Rights Program which has led to work in Ethiopia, Guyana, Britain, Canada, and the Bahamas.

Yvette Modestin, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Yvette Modestin

Board Member

Yvette Modestin, a writer, poet and activist who focuses on shedding light on the Afro descendent experience in Latin America was born and raised in Colon, Panama. She is Founder/Executive Director of Encuentro Diaspora Afro in Boston, MA. She is one of the editors and writers to the book, “Women Warriors of the Afro Latina Diaspora”. Ms. Modestin is the Diaspora Coordinator of the Red de Mujeres Afrolatinoamericanas, Afrocaribeñas y de la Diaspora. . Ms. Modestin has been profiled by the Boston Globe as “The Uniter” for her work in bringing the Latin American and African American community together and for her activism in building a voice for the Afro Latino Community.

Rev. Shirley Gravely-Currie, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Rev. Shirley Gravely-Currie

Board Member

Rev. Gravely-Currie is an associate minister at Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church in Southeast, Washington, DC. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Education, a Master of Business and Public Administration degree in Administrative Management, and a Master of Divinity degree from Howard University School of Divinity. An On-Call Chaplain at Washington Hospital Center, she is also experienced as an advocate for abused and neglected children, at-risk youth, adjudicated youth, victims of domestic violence, women’s issues, and cancer patients.

Greg Akili, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Greg Akili

Board Member

Akili has over 45-years of experience as a labor, community organizer and political leader. (Preferred to called Akili) Akili has dedicated his life to social and racial justice. He has three basic beliefs:

  • Project Coordinator Corporate Accountability International & Los Angeles Black Workers  Center
  • National Field Director Social Security Works Campaign
  • Senior Manager of Field Training and Western Region Field Director  NAACP
  • South Los Angeles Regional Field Director and Trainer, Obama for America campaign
  • Senior Political/Community Organizer, SEIU Local 1000, state employee union
  • Special Assistant to California Assembly Speakers, Antonio R. Villaraigosa, Herb Wesson and Assembly member Mervyn Dymally
  • National Organizer Jessie Jackson President campaign
  • Co-Founder, Vice President,  United Domestic Workers Union
  • Organizer,  United Farm Workers Union
  • Bachelor Degree, Political Science, City University Los Angeles

Leonard G. Dunston, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Leonard G. Dunston

Board Member

Leonard G. Dunston is Vice President of Preudhomme, Dunston and Associates, a consulting and management training firm.  Mr. Dunston is also the former Commissioner of the New York State Division for Youth (now known as the Office of Children and Family Services), a position he held for an agency-record twelve years prior to retiring in 1995 after 29 years of public service. Additionally, he is President Emeritus of the National Association of Black Social Workers, Inc., of which he served as National President from 1994 to 1998.

Mr. Dunston has appeared on over forty national television programs including “Nightline”, CNN, C-SPAN, and nationally syndicated “Night Talk”, Bev Smith, and Sharp Talk radio talk shows.  As a highly respected national and international speaker, Mr. Dunston has given over 400 public speeches, including commencement addresses, and is the recipient of over 300 plagues/citations. He has also facilitated numerous training seminars, been a panelist on Congressional and countless other varied panels.  Mr. Dunston has traveled and lectured extensively in various countries in Africa, the Caribbean and Canada such as South Africa, Zimbabwe, Ghana, Grenada, Cuba, St. Lucia, and Trinidad/Tobago.  During his trip as president of NABSW in August 1998 to the Republic of Benin, West Africa, His Excellency President Mathieu Kerekou granted Head of State status to Mr. Dunston during the country’s 38th anniversary of independence.

Mr. Dunston has been featured in Ebony and Ebony Man magazines, The New York Times, USA Today, numerous local newspapers and journals.  He is also the recipient of over 300 awards, citations, and keys to cities.  Mr. Dunston received a fellowship from the George Soros Foundation in 1998 to implement a “Rites of Passage” program to address the needs of court adjudicated youth in the South Bronx of New York City.  He has also lectured on social and political issues at sixteen colleges and universities.  On October 15, 1995, he was a featured speaker and organizer at the historic Million Man March in Washington, D.C., and he helped to organize the December 2001 State of the Black World Conference in Atlanta, GA, the 2008 State of the Black World Conference/Black Family Summit in New Orleans, LA, where he was a featured speaker at both conferences.  On October 14, 2005 at Howard University, Mr. Dunston co-convened, with the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan, the Million More Movement Black Family Summit of 35 Black national organizations in support of families displaced by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  Mr. Dunston is also a founding member of the National Black Independent Political Party, founding member Coalition of Black Trade Unions, an executive board member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century, and Convener of The IBW/Black Family Summit, Board Member The Harvest Institute, a  member of the Litigation Committee of the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America (N’COBRA), a board member of the National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS, a board member of the All Healers Mental Health Alliance, and a lifetime member of the NAACP.

His diverse public service record spans three decades.  After serving two years in the U.S. Army, Mr. Dunston began his career as a Street Gang Worker in New York City.  Subsequent experiences followed as a former union organizer and president, a local and national community activist.  He has served three New York City Mayors, and two Governors (Governor James B. Hunt in North Carolina and Governor Mario M. Cuomo in New York).  During Governor Cuomo’s tenure, Mr. Dunston served as Commissioner of the New York State Division for Youth where he managed a budget of over $250 million, 3,500 employees, 140 office buildings and institutions and chaired or participated in over 60 Boards, Commissions, State and National Associations.

Mr. Dunston graduated from Livingstone College in Salisbury, North Carolina with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Secondary Education.  He was inducted into his beloved Livingstone’s Hall of Fame in 2002.  He also received a Master of Social Work Administration degree from Hunter College School of Social Work in New York, NY.  Mr. Dunston is most proud of his 50-plus years of marriage to the former Gladys Sapp, his Livingstone College sweetheart, and his two children, daughter Kioka and son Kwame.  Both Kioka and Kwame are graduates of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Hampton University and North Carolina Central University respectively).

Lenny, as friends and family fondly call him, is firmly rooted in the philosophy that is best summarized by the African proverb:  “Working together, the ants ate the elephant.”

Kareem Aziz, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Kareem Aziz

Board Member

A member of the Board of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century and convener of the Baltimore Justice Collaborative, Kareem Aziz is the Director of the Office of Institutional Research and Planning of Sojourner-Douglass College. He is an expert in community based institutional development having served in a variety of leadership roles both within the College and throughout the community.  He received his undergraduate education from Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio and holds a Master of Public Administration Degree from the University of Dayton (Ohio). He did doctoral studies in Educational Leadership at both Morgan State University (1981 – 1984) and more recently with the Union Institute and University in Cincinnati, Ohio (1999 – 2004) where he combined his interests in Educational Leadership with Applied Information Technology through a study of the barriers and benefits to the deployment of the virtual university at HBCUs.  Born and raised in Dayton, Ohio, he was nurtured through a loving community of family and institutions that collaborated in his upbringing and guided his development. Kareem has lived in Baltimore, Md. since 1980 when he first arrived to serve as the Executive Director of the Druid Hill Avenue Branch of the YMCA, reopening it after a five year period of dormancy.

For the past 33 years he has been personally and professionally committed to the mission of Sojourner-Douglass College where he has served in a variety of capacities, most focused around issues of institutional and community based research, planning and program development with particular attention to programs for our youth. In virtually his entire professional career Kareem Aziz has been involved in and dedicated to the development of African American community centered program initiatives: from the establishment of new and revived program centers in the YMCA in both Baltimore and Springfield, Ohio, to serving as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Baltimore Cable Access Corporation during the initial establishment of Public Access Cable Television services to the City of Baltimore.  He also served as the local coordinator for the hosting of two national “State of the Race” conferences held at Sojourner-Douglass College in 1994 and 1997.  He has recently served as the Chairman of the Thurgood Marshall District of the Baltimore Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America, but now functions as the institutional representative and program leader for Afrocentric Boy Scout and Cub Scout units organized at the College. These units have been organized with the assistance of the Roots of Scouting, Inc. organization where Mr. Aziz serves as chairman of the Rites of Passage Program Committee. In this capacity he is leading the way for reviving urban scouting through the infusion of African American “rites of passage” concepts and educational practices into Boy Scout activities.

Kareem has been married to Vernetta “Nini” Aziz for now 30 years. He is a father to three wonderful young adults and a grandfather with 12 grandchildren and 1 great granddaughter who are the light of his life.

Zach Williams, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Zach Williams

Board Member

Zachery Williams is Associate Professor of African American History at the University of Akron, Ohio. In 2003, he received his Ph.D. in history from Bowling Green State University, with a focus on Americana and African American policy history and Africana Studies. He is the author of In Search of the TalentZachery Williams is Associate Professor of African American History at the University of Akron, Ohio. In 2003, he received his Ph.D. in history from Bowling Green State University, with a focus on Americana and African American policy history and Africana Studies. He is the author of In Search of the Talented Tenth: Howard University Public Intellectuals and the Dilemmas of Race, 1926-1970 (Columbia: U of Missouri Press, 2009) and the editor of Africana Cultures and Policy Studies: Scholarship and the Transformation of Public Policy (Contemporary Black History Series. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Dr. Williams has also published articles in the Journal of Pan African Studies, Journal of Religious Thought, the Journal of American Studies of Turkey, and the Journal of African American Men. In the Spring of 2009, in a special issue of The Journal of American Studies of Turkey, focusing on African American Studies, he contributed an article entitled, Recovering the African American Past for the Purposes of the Policy Present: The History and Evolution of Africana Cultures and Policy Studies.” In 2012, Dr. Williams contributed the chapter, “Dreams From My Father: President Barack Obama and the Reconstruction of African American Men’s History and Studies—A Response to the Ford Foundation Report, Why We Can’t Wait,” to the book, African American Males and Education: Researching the Convergence of Race and Identity, published by Information Age Publishing.

In 2003, Dr. Williams co-founded the Africana Cultures and Policy Studies Institute, a policy think tank group dedicated to the study of African American Policy History and development of sustainable solutions to historic and contemporary problems impacting African Americans. Currently, Dr. Williams is the coordinator of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century’s Research Consortium, a member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated Committee on Racial Justice, a recent fellow with the Center for American Progress Research Consortium, and also an Associate Minister at Olivet Institutional Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Since arriving in 2003, he has been active in the Greater Cleveland/Akron community, participating in organizations such as the Institute for Restorative Justice and The Sound of the Genuine. He is married to Kesha Boyce Williams, and they are the proud parents of two daughters, Zion Olivet Williams, six, and Zipporah Raye Williams, three.

ed Tenth: Howard University Public Intellectuals and the Dilemmas of Race, 1926-1970 (Columbia: U of Missouri Press, 2009) and the editor of Africana Cultures and Policy Studies: Scholarship and the Transformation of Public Policy (Contemporary Black History Series. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Dr. Williams has also published articles in the Journal of Pan African Studies, Journal of Religious Thought, the Journal of American Studies of Turkey, and the Journal of African American Men. In the Spring of 2009, in a special issue of The Journal of American Studies of Turkey, focusing on African American Studies, he contributed an article entitled, Recovering the African American Past for the Purposes of the Policy Present: The History and Evolution of Africana Cultures and Policy Studies.” In 2012, Dr. Williams contributed the chapter, “Dreams From My Father: President Barack Obama and the Reconstruction of African American Men’s History and Studies—A Response to the Ford Foundation Report, Why We Can’t Wait,” to the book, African American Males and Education: Researching the Convergence of Race and Identity, published by Information Age Publishing.

In 2003, Dr. Williams co-founded the Africana Cultures and Policy Studies Institute, a policy think tank group dedicated to the study of African American Policy History and development of sustainable solutions to historic and contemporary problems impacting African Americans. Currently, Dr. Williams is the coordinator of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century’s Research Consortium, a member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated Committee on Racial Justice, a recent fellow with the Center for American Progress Research Consortium, and also an Associate Minister at Olivet Institutional Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Since arriving in 2003, he has been active in the Greater Cleveland/Akron community, participating in organizations such as the Institute for Restorative Justice and The Sound of the Genuine. He is married to Kesha Boyce Williams, and they are the proud parents of two daughters, Zion Olivet Williams, six, and Zipporah Raye Williams, three.

Harris Floyd, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Harris Floyd

Board Member

Harris Floyd is a Partner and Principal of Business Development for The HarMonSi Group. She is also a Corporate Engagement Professional specializing in Corporate Partnering and Sponsorship for The National Association of Homebuilders.

Harris is experienced in business development and business strategy, and specializes in marketing, sales, and developing corporate partnering opportunities. She has held several leadership positions including Director of Business Development for several private sector firms. Harris received her B. S. degree with a double major in marketing and business management from the University of Richmond; which she attended on full merit scholarship.

Since that time, she has worked in the corporate sector where she was instrumental in the growth of the oldest black owned architectural and engineering firm in the country, and advancing a black owned software development company to the prestigious “Washington Technology Fast 50”. In her current role, Harris works with national businesses and organizations to develop corporate engagement opportunities that have bottom line results.

Jemadari Kamara, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Jemadari Kamara

Board Member

Jemadari Kamara is the founding director of the Center for African, Caribbean and Community Development at the University of Massachusetts Boston (UMB). Dr. Kamara served as dean of the College of Public and Community Service (1988-1993) and chairman of the Africana Studies Department (1996-2001, 2007-2008, 2011) at the UMB. He also served as a Fulbright Scholar at the Universite Nationale du Benin (1985-1987). He has taught at several other universities including the University of Michigan, Brandeis and Dillard Universities.

During the 1990’s he helped to found and continues to coordinate the Annual Martin Luther King, Jr./ Amilcar Cabral Commemorative Program. Also, he collaborated in developing the Community Action Information Network (CAIN). Funded by Kellogg and Boston Foundation grants, this project assisted community based organizations in applying technology and data-based information to community defined purposes for development. A monograph series, Race, Space and Policy Issues, has documented the work of this project.

Dr. Kamara has been involved in educational, environmental and economic development projects both in the United States and West Africa. He serves as an international coordinator for the Youth, Education and Sports (YES) with Africa Program which has served nearly 3000 African youth with branches in Senegal and Benin. From 2001-2002 he was a Senior Fulbright Professor at the Universite Gaston Berger in St.Louis, Senegal. Of particular interest has been his ongoing work using photovoltaic (solar) systems for electrification and economic development.

Among his numerous publications are the State of the Race –Creating Our 21st Century (2004) co-editor and contributor (Charshee McIntrye Award, African Heritage Studies Association Outstanding Book of the Year) and Socially Responsible Investment and Economic Development (1987) editor.

Professor Kamara earned the Ph.D. in the Urban, Technological and Environmental Planning Program at the University of Michigan. He also attended Tufts University and Fourah Bay College in Freetown, Sierra Leone. He is the father of two adult children.

Active in many national and community activities, Dr. Kamara serves as a senior advisor to the Boston Pan-African Forum, Treasurer of the West African Research Association and on the board of directors of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century.

Mary France Daniels

Board Member

Mary France-Daniels  attended York College of the City University of New York, graduating Cum Laude in 1980 with a BA in English.  She has served as an Adjunct Professor, taught Continuing Education and Remedial Classes and served as Director of various programs at York.  She also served as Director of the Homework Assistance Program at Langston Hughes Library and a Substitute Teacher at Intermediate School 227.  In 1988 she was chosen by Dr. Richard Green, New York City’s first African American Chancellor, to serve as Director of the Office of Parent Involvement, and also served on New York States’ Sub-Committee for Low Performing Schools.

Over the years Sister Daniels has worked with young people, taught Sunday School and Bible Study.  Deeply devoted to her Christian faith, Mary has served as Vice-Moderator of Corona Congregational Church and is currently a Deaconess and Adult Sunday School Teacher.

Mary takes great pride in being a political and social justice activist. In 1998, in an effort to create an alternative Party in New York State, she ran for Governor, collecting more than 20,000 signatures to qualify for the ballot and received 10,000 votes on Election Day.  Since 2001, she has worked with her husband/partner, Dr. Ron Daniels, to build Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW), an organization dedicated to the upliftment of people of African descent and other oppressed people.  She currently serves as Secretary of the Board of IBW.

Jacqueline Patterson, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Jacqui Patterson

Board Member

Jacqueline Patterson is the Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program. Since 2007 Patterson has served as coordinator & co-founder of Women of Color United. Jacqui Patterson has worked as a researcher, program manager, coordinator, advocate and activist working on women‘s rights, violence against women, HIV&AIDS, racial justice, economic justice, and environmental and climate justice. Patterson served as a Senior Women’s Rights Policy Analyst for ActionAid where she integrated a women’s rights lens for the issues of food rights, macroeconomics, and climate change as well as the intersection of violence against women and HIV&AIDS.

Previously, she served as Assistant Vice-President of HIV/AIDS Programs for IMA World Health providing management and technical assistance to medical facilities and programs in 23 countries in Africa and the Caribbean. Patterson served as the Outreach Project Associate for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and Research Coordinator for Johns Hopkins University. She was also a U.S. Peace Corps Jamaica volunteer.  Patterson’s publications/Articles include: ”Jobs vs Health: An Unnecessary Dilemma”, “Climate Change is a Civil Rights Issue”, “Gulf Oil Drilling Disaster: Gendered Layers of Impact”, “Disasters, Climate Change Uproot Women of Color” and an upcoming book chapter, “Equity in Disasters: Civil and Human Rights Challenges in the Context of Emergency Events” in the book Building Community Resilience Post-Disaster.

Patterson holds a master’s degree in social work from the University of Maryland and a master’s degree in public health from Johns Hopkins University. She currently serves on the Gender Justice Working Group of the US Social Forum, the Advisory Committee for The Grandmothers’ Project, the Steering Committee of Interfaith Moral Action on Climate Change, as well as on the Board of Directors for the Institute of the Black World, Center for Story Based Strategies and the US Climate Action Network.

Cristalina Pereira

Board Member

Cristalina Pereira is a Community Relations Facilitator with the Brockton Public Schools. In that capacity, she provides a link between the school system and non-English speaking parents of students. She coordinates parent activities, including training, in collaboration with the Bilingual/ESL Services Department and organizes parents meetings whenever necessary to inform parents of issues that are pertinent to the education of limited and non-English speaking students.

Active in various community organizations, Cristalina is a board member of the Boston Pan-African Forum, of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century, and of the Black Men’s Health Organization. She is also a founding member and has been one of the coordinators of the Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. / Amilcar Cabral Commemorative Program. She was a board member and later (2005-2007) vice-president of the Cape Verdean Association of Brockton and assists Cape Verdean immigrants with matters related to employment, health, education, social and legal services, and housing.

Cristalina is also deeply involved in the politics of Cabo Verde. From 2007 to 2012, she was a member of the Cape Verdean National Assembly, representing the Cape Verdean diaspora in the United States.  She is currently a member of the National Council of PAICV (African Party for the Independence of Cabo Verde), chair of the political sector including Brockton, New Bedford, Taunton, Stoughton, and Randolph.

Cristalina earned a BA in Human Services at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. She also trained as a school leader in the Comer School Development Program, a division of the Yale University Child Study Center.

Cristalina is fluent in Cape Verdean Creole, Portuguese, French, English, and Spanish.

Hulbert James, Board Member of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW21)

Hulbert James

Board Member

Hulbert James has over 40 years of electoral and community organizing experience.

Hulbert has extensive experience in government having served as Director of Caribbean affairs under Mayor David Dinkins, Regional Director for US Dept of Labor Community Builder for US Dept of Housing and Urban Development

Hulbert has worked for numerous community based organization. He was a co founder of the Center for Third World Organizing[CTWO] am major training center in community organizing,

Economic Director for the National Council of Churches, President of Human SERVE voter registration and founding staff director of CEF the voter registration arm of the Rainbow coalition.

Hulbert served as Co-chair for party development for the National Black Independent Party.

He recently served as national Director of UNITY DIASPORA COALITION , formed to increase participation of Caribbean-Americans and continental Africans in the 2010 census.

Hulbert has worked in the International area having served in the 1970’s  as President of Pan African Skills Project [PAS] recruited black Americans to work in Tanzania.  He currently works with IBW President  Dr. Ron Daniels on the Haitian Support Project.