All Posts By

IBW21

Prime Minister Gaston Browne

Prime Minister Gaston Browne on Western Banking, Colonialism and Reparations

By Reparations

Address by Prime Minister Gaston Browne during the Caribbean Reparations Commission Regional Symposium on Western Banking, Colonialism and Reparations, October 10, 2019. I bring no special expertise or unique perspective to the issue of reparations. However, I am here primarily to signify my personal commitment to the fight to achieve reparatory justice. Approximately five years ago, on October 14, 2014, at the second regional conference on reparations, held at…

Read More
Aerial view of Rikers Island

Making Sense of the Fight over New York City Jails

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Gabriel Sayegh, Katal Center for Health, Equity, and Justice — The fight to close Rikers is reaching a boiling point again. Next week, the New York City Council will vote on the land-use proposal for the construction of replacement jail facilities in the boroughs. The proposal is a major component of the City’s contentious plan to close Rikers, and the entire process has generated controversy within the movement to…

Read More
Panelists from “The Decade of the Diaspora: A Conversation on the Afro Descendant Experience in Latin America” session during the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation annual legislative conference.

Shining a light on Black suffering and slaughter in Latin America

By News & Current Affairs

By Michael Z. Muhammad — Though there are differences, Blacks in the Western Hemisphere are suffering and need to find ways to connect and support their struggle, overcome racial oppression and thrive. That was a major message from “The Decade of the Diaspora: A Conversation on the Afro Descendant Experience in Latin America” panel discussion at the Washington Convention Center during the recent Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s…

Read More
‘Our Door of Return’ African Diaspora Economic Forum

‘Our Door of Return’ African Diaspora Economic Forum

By News & Current Affairs

This year 2019 is significant as it marks 400 years since the first documented ship anchored the shores of America with chained slaves. Since they left through the Door of No Return, there is a mobilisation of African Americans to connect with Africa, through the Door of Our Return. Collaboration with the Diaspora in private sector, government, civil society is key in mobilising and sharing knowledge, expertise, technologies and economic…

Read More
The Freedman. Artist: John Quincy Adams Ward. 1863

The Sexual Assault and Exploitation of Enslaved Men in America

By Reparations

By Thomas A. Foster, History News Network — Editor’s note: This is an excerpt from Rethinking Rufus: Sexual Violations of Enslaved Men by Thomas A. Foster. Reprinted with permission from The University of Georgia Press. The promise of freedom may also have been used to entice enslaved men into sexual contact with white women. In eighteenth-century Pennsylvania, one court record of punishment meted out to a white woman and an enslaved man for…

Read More
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History

400 years later, America still has so much to learn about its racial history

By Editors' Choice

By Lonnie Bunch, The Washington Post — In his influential treatise on race, “The Fire Next Time,” James Baldwin wrote, “To accept one’s past — one’s history — is not the same thing as drowning in it; it is learning how to use it. An invented past can never be used; it cracks and crumbles under the pressures of life like clay in a season of drought.” Baldwin’s words…

Read More
Native Americans

Where Did We Come From? And who was there in the first place?

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Heather Gray, Justice Initiative — Preface This will be the beginning of a series about where we came from and/or who was there already. Trump repeatedly says “Go back to where you came from.” So, I have questioned what on earth does he mean by that. All of us homo sapiens in the world came from Africa. But, also, as I started thinking about where I was born and where I…

Read More
A police officer aims his weapon after demonstrators

Haiti protesters ask the international community to stop supporting their president

By News & Current Affairs

By Jacqueline Charles, Miami Herald — A massive crowd of anti-government protesters in Haiti cranked up the pressure for President Jovenel Moïse to step down Friday, taking their resignation demands to the United Nation’s peacekeeping headquarters in Port-au-Prince, where they asked the international community to stop supporting the country’s leader. Tying up traffic in front of Toussaint Louverture International Airport, the demonstrators — who later burned tires in front of…

Read More
Students at Georgetown University have called on the school to create a fund to help descendants of enslaved people sold in the 19th century.

Georgetown students protest, demanding action on reparations for descendants of enslaved people

By News & Current Affairs, Reparations

By Lauren Lumpkin and Susan Svrluga, The Washington Post — A couple dozen Georgetown University students broke into a chant Thursday outside a meeting of the school’s board of directors, seeking to put pressure on the university to do more to redress historical wrongs. “Respect our vote! Respect our vote!” they called out. A student vote in April overwhelmingly called on Georgetown to create a fund to help descendants of…

Read More
Mural of the slave ship Clotilda along Africatown Blvd

America’s last slave ship could offer a case for reparations

By News & Current Affairs, Reparations

By Jay Reeves, Associated Press — MOBILE, Ala. — Alabama steamship owner Timothy Meaher financed the last slave vessel that brought African captives to the United States, and he came out of the Civil War a wealthy man. His descendants, with land worth millions, are still part of Mobile society’s upper crust. The people whom Meaher enslaved, however, emerged from the war with freedom but little else. Census forms that…

Read More