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IBW21

John Henrik Clarke

The Impact of Marcus Garvey by Dr. John Henrik Clarke

By Commentaries/Opinions

When Marcus Garvey died in 1940 the role of the British Empire was already being challenged by India and the rising expectations of her African colonies. Marcus Garvey’s avocation of African redemption and the restoration of the African state’s sovereign political entity in world affairs was still a dream without fulfillment. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, the United States would enter, in a formal way, what…

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Thomas Sankara

Thomas Sankara trial in Burkina Faso: Who killed ‘Africa’s Che Guevara’?

By News & Current Affairs

Thirty-four years, almost to the day, since the shocking killing of Burkina Faso’s then President, Thomas Sankara, 14 men are going on trial, accused of complicity in the murder of the man known as “Africa’s Che Guevara”. By Jewel Kiriungi, BBC News — The charismatic Pan-Africanist was shot dead aged 37 by soldiers during a coup on 15 October 1987, which saw his close friend, Blaise Compaoré, come to power….

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Rev. Jesse Jackson

Rev. Jesse L. Jackson: A Living Legend & Icon

By Commentaries/Opinions

By TBT News — The Reverend Jesse L. Jackson reaches a hallmark this past Friday, October 8, when he turns 80 years old. He is the most senior Black civil rights leader to live. Frederick Douglas died at 78, Marcus Garvey died at 53, and Booker T. Washington died at 59. The modern leaders Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, and Malcolm X were both assassinated at 39. And since we do not have civil rights leaders to live long lives, we don’t…

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Fatima Garcia of the group Danza Azteca Guadalupana dances during an event celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Austin, Texas, on Saturday.

Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Explained

By Editors' Choice

Many cities and states are observing the day. Here’s some of the history behind it. By Melina Delkic, NYT — President Biden has proclaimed Monday, Oct. 11, as Indigenous Peoples’ Day, becoming the first U.S. president to formally recognize the day. “For generations, Federal policies systematically sought to assimilate and displace Native people and eradicate Native cultures,” Mr. Biden wrote in the proclamation issued on Friday. “Today, we recognize Indigenous peoples’…

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Joe Biden

A Proclamation on Indigenous Peoples’ Day, 2021

By News & Current Affairs

By President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — Since time immemorial, American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians have built vibrant and diverse cultures — safeguarding land, language, spirit, knowledge, and tradition across the generations. On Indigenous Peoples’ Day, our Nation celebrates the invaluable contributions and resilience of Indigenous peoples, recognizes their inherent sovereignty, and commits to honoring the Federal Government’s trust and treaty obligations to Tribal Nations. Our country was…

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Protesters marched in an Indigenous Peoples Day rally in Boston on Oct. 10, 2020, as part of a demonstration to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples' Day. Boston made that change last week.

Goodbye, Columbus? Here’s what Indigenous Peoples’ Day means to Native Americans

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Emma Bowman, NPR — This year marks the first time a U.S. president has officially recognized Indigenous Peoples’ Day. President Biden issued a proclamation on Friday to observe this Oct. 11 as a day to honor Native Americans, their resilience and their contributions to American society throughout history, even as they faced assimilation, discrimination and genocide spanning generations. The move shifts focus from Columbus Day, the federal holiday celebrating Christopher Columbus,…

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Vantage Point: Professor on the Soap Box with Audience as Policy Advisors on Critical Issues

By News & Current Affairs, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Monday, October 11, 2021 — On this edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor steps onto the soap box with audience as policy advisors on critical issues. The Issues What Should U.S. Immigration Policy Look Like? How to Solve the Crisis of Mass Shootings and Gun Violence? Does Biden Need a Black Agenda? Can the Orange man Quest for White Minority Rule Be Stopped Ways to…

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Abdulrazak Gurnah

The Nobel Prize in literature goes to a Black writer for the first time since 1993

By News & Current Affairs

The Zanzibar-born novelist is known for his postcolonial works, examining refugee life in England and the effects of empire. He is the first Black person awarded the prize since Toni Morrison in 1993 By Andrew Limbong, NPR — Zanzibar-born novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah won this year’s Nobel Prize in literature. “For his uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee in the gulf between…

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Slave Shackles

Britain’s colonial shame: Slave-owners given huge payouts after abolition

By Reparations

David Cameron’s ancestors were among the wealthy families who received generous reparation payments that would be worth millions of pounds in today’s money By Sanchez Manning, Independent — The true scale of Britain’s involvement in the slave trade has been laid bare in documents revealing how the country’s wealthiest families received the modern equivalent of billions of pounds in compensation after slavery was abolished. The previously unseen records show exactly…

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Donald Trump supporters outside the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6, 2021

America is on the same roadmap we saw in Germany in the 1930s

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Chauncey DeVega, Salon — In a recent interview with MSNBC, former Republican strategist Steve Schmidt issued a stern warning to Americans who have not yet grasped the nature of our present crisis of democracy. “We have an autocratic movement teeming with violence and the intimations of violence in this country,” he said, inviting viewers of the liberal news channel to imagine “that domestic terrorist, that criminal who desecrated the American flag…

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Haitian Refugees

What America owes Haitian asylum seekers

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Michael Posner, NYT — Last month, the Biden administration announced that it had cleared a makeshift tent camp where thousands of Haitians had congregated under a bridge linking Mexico and Del Rio, Texas. They had arrived there desperate to gain admission to the United States, many fleeing persecution in Haiti and seeking the protection of our asylum law. The administration’s unsteady response to this crisis has revealed, once again, the broken…

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American Indian Movement (AIM) took down a statue of Columbus near the Minnesota State Capitol in St. Paul

The forgotten history of solidarity between Black and Indigenous freedom movements

By Editors' Choice

By Kyle T. Mays, HNN — Since the emergence of Black Lives Matter in 2013, the Standing Rock Sioux-led global protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline, and more recently, the murders of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, Black and Indigenous co-resistance has once again come to the forefront of our national consciousness. Instead of calls to “police the police” or for “community control” of police from the 1960s, activists have…

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