Category

Commentaries/Opinions

Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Forget the Adversity Score, Just Dump the SAT

By | Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — The College Board, the organization that develops and administers the SAT test, has developed a new “adversity score” to augment the widely used college admissions examination. The fact that the College Board has had to create an “adversity score” is reason enough to discard the badly flawed SAT test, a test that many consider racially biased, and that only measures the likelihood of first-year college success….

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Campaign poster of 1856 Republican Candidates for President and Vice President John C. Frémont and William D. Dayton. US Senate

Antislavery Wasn’t Mainstream, Until It Was

By | Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

After Republicans lost their first election in 1856, the nineteenth-century Nate Silvers were happy to declare the antislavery movement a radical, fringe idea. Four years later, Abraham Lincoln won on a radical program of change. By Matt Karp, Jacobin — In 1856, the new Republican Party ran its first candidate for President, the western explorer John C. Fremont. He was an unusual leader for an unusual party. The Republicans’ aggressive…

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Kenya Flag

Kenya’s ties with superpowers pay off

By | Commentaries/Opinions

For decades particularly throughout the Cold War, African nations chose a side among the competing global powers. At the height of Soviet-American tensions in the 20th Century, African leaders felt compelled to choose an allegiance to one at the cost of other. By George Maangi, Standard Digital — Frequently, African neighbours would be in direct competition and even conflict because of their alliance to East or West. Since the fall…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Beyond the Bondage of Plantation Politics: Crafting Our Own Presidential Platform — Part 1

By | Dr. Maulana Karenga

Part. 1. By Dr. Maulana Karenga — During both the Holocaust of enslavement and the era of segregation, leaving the plantation was a metaphor, mental process and actual practice of freedom. It was a freeing oneself mentally and physically, thinking freedom and then acting in ways that led to its achievement as did Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Fannie Lou Hamer, Messenger Muhammad and countless others in their rejection of and resistance to…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Beyond the Bondage of Plantation Politics: Crafting Our Own Presidential Platform — Part 2

By | Dr. Maulana Karenga

Part. 2. By Dr. Maulana Karenga — The insistence on calling our righteous and relentless struggle by its rightful name, The Black Freedom Movement, instead of the Civil Rights Movement, is no minor matter.  For it speaks to our commitment to freedom itself and reflects in a real way how we understand ourselves and our initiative and history in the world. Indeed, it reveals our resistance to plantation politics that…

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Representative Sheila Jackson Lee (D., Texas), speaking during a House committee hearing.

Reparations: The ‘lost cause’ of black politics?

By | Commentaries/Opinions

By Roger House, The Hill — The black American demand for reparations over slavery and segregation has gained attention in political circles recently. How it emerged as a topic of federal policy is unclear — but it comes at a timely moment in our national story. This year marks the 400th anniversary of the first enslaved Africans arriving at the colony of Jamestown, Va. No doubt the 2014 magazine essay by Ta-Nehisi…

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Thomas Craemer, associate professor of public policy, at the UConn Hartford campus

One Professor’s Journey to the Past Through Reparations

By | Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

By Christine Buckley, UConn Today —  Last month, Georgetown University’s undergraduate students voted in favor of a referendum to voluntarily charge each student a fee to be paid into a fund benefiting the descendants of enslaved people that the university sold to save itself from financial ruin in the 19th century. The move came in response to the university’s lack of action on the recommendation of its own Working Group…

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U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton arrives to address reporters as the Trump administration announces economic sanctions against Venezuela

The CIA’s View of Venezuela: What We Learn From the Archives

By | Commentaries/Opinions

CIA public archives show the objective of U.S. policymakers, regardless of the political party, is to monitor the activities of foreign nations, particularly resource-rich ones. By T.J. Coles — In 2017, then-U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director Mike Pompeo said: “we are very hopeful that there can be a [political] transition in Venezuela and we the CIA is doing its best to understand the dynamic there [sic], so that we can…

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National Economic Council Director Larry Summers, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, and Office of Management and Budget Director Peter Orszag look at President Barack Obama during an economic meeting in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, March 24, 2009.

Obama’s Original Sin

By | Commentaries/Opinions

A new insider account reveals how the Obama administration’s botched bailout deal not only reinforced neoliberal Clintonism, but also foreshadowed an ongoing failure to fulfill campaign promises. By Eric Rauchway, Boston Review — In November 2008, as a financial mudslide that had slowly been accelerating for months accumulated increasingly persuasive comparisons to the collapse that triggered the Great Depression in 1929, Time magazine ran a cover showing Barack Obama’s smiling face inserted in place…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

How Strong Is Our Economy?

By | Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — The April unemployment rate, at 3.6 percent, is at its lowest rate since December 1969. Payroll employment increased by more than 250,000, outperforming expectations and reversing the disappointing job creation numbers of last month. First quarter growth was reported at 3.2 percent, a robust figure that exceeds estimates, earlier this year, that growth would be somewhat slower. This perhaps gives the man who lives in the…

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