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A South Sudanese boy belonging to a cultural dance group uses moistened ground chalk to mark traditional tribe paintings on his face

World’s languages traced back to single African mother tongue: scientists

By News & Current Affairs

Scientists say they have traced the world’s 6,000 modern languages — from English to Mandarin — back to a single “mother tongue,” an ancestral language spoken in Africa 50,000 to 70,000 years ago. New research, published in the journal Science, suggests this single ancient language resulted in human civilization — a Diaspora — as well as advances in art and hunting tool technology, and laid the groundwork for all the…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Raising the Million Man March: Remembering and reaffirming its mission

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — It was 26 years ago, October 16, 1995, that we stood firmly together, 2 million plus strong in Washington, D.C. Called to action by Min. Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam and the critical juncture and demands of our history, we declared our commitment to assume a new and expanded responsibility in life, love and struggle. Below follows an excerpt from the Million Man March/Day…

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View of the Confederate memorial, with an added Confederate flag made out of flowers, Jasper, Alabama, 2010.

White America’s “hidden wound” threatens to destroy the country — and not for the first time

By News & Current Affairs

Half a century ago, writer Wendell Berry saw this coming: What white people can’t talk about is destroying them. By Kirk Swearingen, Salon — Words matter; poetry has power. It’s not for nothing that authoritarians first go after the intellectuals, the journalists, the poets. Consider these well-wrought statements: All men are created equal Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness Liberté, égalité, fraternité Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice…

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John Henrik Clarke

The Impact of Marcus Garvey by Dr. John Henrik Clarke

By Commentaries/Opinions

When Marcus Garvey died in 1940 the role of the British Empire was already being challenged by India and the rising expectations of her African colonies. Marcus Garvey’s avocation of African redemption and the restoration of the African state’s sovereign political entity in world affairs was still a dream without fulfillment. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, the United States would enter, in a formal way, what…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Labor shortage or pay shortfall?

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Walking down a busy urban street, one cannot help but notice the number of “help wanted” signs that grace the front of many establishments. Restaurants, grocery stores, and retail establishments all seem to want workers. Many of them indicate their starting pay is “at least” $15 an hour. Some list other benefits in the window, including things like vacation time, employee discounts, and more. Workers…

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Thomas Sankara

Thomas Sankara trial in Burkina Faso: Who killed ‘Africa’s Che Guevara’?

By News & Current Affairs

Thirty-four years, almost to the day, since the shocking killing of Burkina Faso’s then President, Thomas Sankara, 14 men are going on trial, accused of complicity in the murder of the man known as “Africa’s Che Guevara”. By Jewel Kiriungi, BBC News — The charismatic Pan-Africanist was shot dead aged 37 by soldiers during a coup on 15 October 1987, which saw his close friend, Blaise Compaoré, come to power….

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Rev. Jesse Jackson

Rev. Jesse L. Jackson: A Living Legend & Icon

By Commentaries/Opinions

By TBT News — The Reverend Jesse L. Jackson reaches a hallmark this past Friday, October 8, when he turns 80 years old. He is the most senior Black civil rights leader to live. Frederick Douglas died at 78, Marcus Garvey died at 53, and Booker T. Washington died at 59. The modern leaders Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, and Malcolm X were both assassinated at 39. And since we do not have civil rights leaders to live long lives, we don’t…

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Fatima Garcia of the group Danza Azteca Guadalupana dances during an event celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Austin, Texas, on Saturday.

Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Explained

By Editors' Choice

Many cities and states are observing the day. Here’s some of the history behind it. By Melina Delkic, NYT — President Biden has proclaimed Monday, Oct. 11, as Indigenous Peoples’ Day, becoming the first U.S. president to formally recognize the day. “For generations, Federal policies systematically sought to assimilate and displace Native people and eradicate Native cultures,” Mr. Biden wrote in the proclamation issued on Friday. “Today, we recognize Indigenous peoples’…

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Joe Biden

A Proclamation on Indigenous Peoples’ Day, 2021

By News & Current Affairs

By President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — Since time immemorial, American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians have built vibrant and diverse cultures — safeguarding land, language, spirit, knowledge, and tradition across the generations. On Indigenous Peoples’ Day, our Nation celebrates the invaluable contributions and resilience of Indigenous peoples, recognizes their inherent sovereignty, and commits to honoring the Federal Government’s trust and treaty obligations to Tribal Nations. Our country was…

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Protesters marched in an Indigenous Peoples Day rally in Boston on Oct. 10, 2020, as part of a demonstration to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples' Day. Boston made that change last week.

Goodbye, Columbus? Here’s what Indigenous Peoples’ Day means to Native Americans

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Emma Bowman, NPR — This year marks the first time a U.S. president has officially recognized Indigenous Peoples’ Day. President Biden issued a proclamation on Friday to observe this Oct. 11 as a day to honor Native Americans, their resilience and their contributions to American society throughout history, even as they faced assimilation, discrimination and genocide spanning generations. The move shifts focus from Columbus Day, the federal holiday celebrating Christopher Columbus,…

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Vantage Point: Professor on the Soap Box with Audience as Policy Advisors on Critical Issues

By News & Current Affairs, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Monday, October 11, 2021 — On this edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor steps onto the soap box with audience as policy advisors on critical issues. The Issues What Should U.S. Immigration Policy Look Like? How to Solve the Crisis of Mass Shootings and Gun Violence? Does Biden Need a Black Agenda? Can the Orange man Quest for White Minority Rule Be Stopped Ways to…

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Abdulrazak Gurnah

The Nobel Prize in literature goes to a Black writer for the first time since 1993

By News & Current Affairs

The Zanzibar-born novelist is known for his postcolonial works, examining refugee life in England and the effects of empire. He is the first Black person awarded the prize since Toni Morrison in 1993 By Andrew Limbong, NPR — Zanzibar-born novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah won this year’s Nobel Prize in literature. “For his uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee in the gulf between…

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