Barbara Lee

It’s Time to Repeal the President’s License for Endless War

By Commentaries/Opinions

Passed by Congress 19 years ago, the post-9/11 Authorization for Use of Military Force, along with the 2002 AUMF, is still being used to justify wars that have not made us, or the world, safer. By Barbara Lee, Newsweek — More Americans have now died from COVID-19 than from the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan combined. Yet the United States is poised to continue spending more money on…

Read More
People await help with unemployment claims at an event in Tulsa, Okla., on July 24.

The Top 1% of Americans Have Taken $50 Trillion From the Bottom 90% — And That’s Made the U.S. Less Secure

By COVID-19 (Coronavirus), News & Current Affairs

A new report shows that a $50 trillion redistribution of income to benefit the richest has made America less healthy, resilient, and secure. By Nick Hanauer and David M. Rolf, TIME — Like many of the virus’s hardest hit victims, the United States went into the COVID-19 pandemic wracked by preexisting conditions. A fraying public health infrastructure, inadequate medical supplies, an employer-based health insurance system perversely unsuited to the moment—these and other afflictions are surely contributing…

Read More

Vantage Point: Black Native American Freedmen Demand Justice

By News & Current Affairs, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Vantage Point September 14, 2020 — On this special edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with guests Ronald Graham and Marilyn Vann. Topic Black Native American Freedmen Demand Justice Guests Ronald Graham, President, Muscogee Creek Freedmen Band, Oklahoma City, OK Marilyn Vann, President, Descendants of Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes, Oklahoma City, OK Ways to listen Live (Radio) — Mondays 3-4PM on WBAI,…

Read More
Screaming

How Systemic Racism Adapts and Evolves

By Editors' Choice

By Tom Hall, LA Progressive – Where do we go from here? We’ve had a long hot summer of mostly peaceful demonstrations. This is a great contrast to the pre-election summer of 1968, in which Tricky Dick Nixon road a wave of violence to electoral victory. But this is also a summer of demonstrations against police violence, and that repeats both the pattern of 1968 and of decades back through…

Read More
Nigerian migrants arrive in Lagos from Libya. Nigeria has, in the last two years, evacuated thousands of its citizens from Libya and Lebanon after they suffered several forms of abuses, including enslavement. Trafficking has resulted in at least 80,000 Nigerian women being held as sex slaves and forced labour in the Middle East.

The Exploitative System that Traps Nigerian Women as Slaves in Lebanon

By News & Current Affairs

By Sam Olukoya, IPS – “I need help, right now I cannot walk properly,” trafficking victim Nkiru Obasi pleaded from her hospital bed in a video she posted online. The young Nigerian woman had been injured in the Aug. 4 Beirut blast, which ripped through the Lebanese capital, killing 190 people injuring a further 6,500 and damaging 40 percent of the city. However, it’s not…

Read More
Ben Jealous

The Key to Motivating Young Voters? Young Candidates

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Ben Jealous — One of the most exciting parts of this year’s Democratic National Convention for me was the keynote speech delivered collectively by a group of young progressive elected officials, many of them Black. They showed us the potential for a promising future once we have gotten past the presidency of Donald Trump. They also showed us how to get there. One way to make sure we remove…

Read More
Harriet Tubman

University of Maryland renames women’s studies department after Harriet Tubman

By Commentaries/Opinions

Born a slave in Maryland, the famous abolitionist led dozens to freedom through the Underground Railroad. By Danielle Wallace, Fox News — The University of Maryland announced Friday it’s renaming the women’s studies department after Harriet Tubman – the 19-century abolitionist and famous female “conductor” on the Underground Railroad. “It is my honor to announce a major milestone in our university’s history: the first honorific naming of an academic department at UMD, the Harriet Tubman Department…

Read More
Donald Yacovone

How Textbooks Taught White Supremacy

By Commentaries/Opinions

A historian steps back to the 1700s and shares what’s changed and what needs to change. By Liz Mineo, The Harvard Gazaette — Historian Donald Yacovone, an associate at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research and a 2013 winner of the W.E.B. Du Bois medal, was researching a book on the legacy of the antislavery movement when he came across some old history school textbooks that stopped him cold —…

Read More
The U.S. Is Borrowing Its Way to Fascism

The U.S. Is Borrowing Its Way to Fascism

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Richard D. Wolff — Viewing the GOP convention seemed a little like binge-watching the last several years’ parade of none-too-subtle signs of incipient fascism. We saw extreme nationalism, scapegoating immigrants and foreigners in general, white supremacy, “strong (narcissistic)-man” government, aggressive foreign policies, and hysterical red-baiting. Those signs reflect how capitalism’s deepening crisis undermines both the center-left (Democrat) and center-right (GOP) and shifts politics further right and further left. Trump…

Read More
Dr. Benjamin Chavis

Civil Rights Icon Dr. Benjamin Chavis to Host Weekly Black Talk Show on PBS

By News & Current Affairs

By Hazel Trice Edney — Civil rights icon Dr. Benjamin Chavis, former NAACP executive director and current president/CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA), will become host of a weekly Black-oriented public affairs talk show on PBS (Public Broadcasting System) in October. As racial tensions and disparities have skyrocketed in almost every category of American life, Chavis and the show’s producer Clara Wilkerson says it’s time for a program…

Read More