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Education Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Terri L. Crawford with Senator Nina Turner

Protecting Democracy – An Interview with Sen. Nina Turner

By Editors' Choice

By Terri L. Crawford, JD, The Omaha Star — “Moreover, he shall speak for you to the people; and he will be as a mouth for you …” — Exodus 4:16 As the voice of the people, the Nebraska Democratic Party Black Caucus’ mission is to promote the involvement of Blacks in the political process and the activities of the party at the local, state, and national level. The Caucus…

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CRC - Prof. Verene Shepherd

Capitalism & Slavery: A Handbook for Reparation Advocates in the Post-Colonial Caribbean

By Reparations

Keynote speech by Prof. Verene Shepherd during symposium on reparations in Trinidad and Tobago on November 13, 2019. By Prof. Verene A. Shepherd Director, Centre for Reparation Research, The UWI Thank you Dr. Pemberton and good afternoon to everyone in this distinguished audience. Of course I must pay my respects to Prime Ms Erica Williams-Connell; Dean Cateau and her team of organizers; fellow presenters, reparation advocates, students, members of…

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Protesters outside the Howard County Board of Education building in Ellicott City, Md., last month.

Where Civility Is a Motto, a School Integration Fight Turns Bitter

By News & Current Affairs

A plan to desegregate schools in a liberal Maryland suburb founded on values of tolerance has met with stiff resistance. By Dana Goldstein, New York Times. Columbia, Md. — The planned community of Columbia, southwest of Baltimore, has prided itself on its ethos of inclusion ever since it was founded more than half a century ago. Racially integrated. Affordable apartments near big homes. “The Next America” was its optimistic,…

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The Library of Trinity College.

History Has a Race Problem, and It’s Existential

By Editors' Choice

By Allison Miller — History, as a discipline, has a race problem. White people dominate the study of history, as students and as those who earn PhDs. According to federal government statistics, in the school year 2016–17 (the most recent for which we had data at press time) white students received 74 percent of all history bachelor’s degrees, but only 56 percent of all US resident students enrolled in four-year colleges and universities were…

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Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota

Researching, Teaching, and Embodying the Black Diaspora: An Introduction

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Charisse Burden-Stelly and Crystal Moten, Black Perspectives — Part I: Studying the Black Diaspora, Then and Now From May 22-24, 2019, a group of scholars from liberal arts colleges throughout the country gathered at Carleton College for a workshop titled, “Teaching, Researching, and Embodying the Black Diaspora at Elite Liberal Arts Colleges.” Organized by Drs. Crystal Moten, Chipo Dendere, and Charisse Burden-Stelly, this workshop aimed to interrogate a host…

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BSU and CSA presented videos by Marianne Williamson and Dr. Umar Johnson speaking about reparations. The reparations discussion was held at Student Union on Thursday.

University at Buffalo students weigh in on reparations for slavery

By Reparations

Black Student Union and the Caribbean Student Association lead discussion about reparations on Thursday. By Julian Roberts-Grmela, UB Spectrum — Jeffery Clinton says he can’t forgive or forget the injustices his family and community endured throughout U.S. history. Clinton, a senior English and African American studies major and president of the African American Studies Academic Association, is a descendant of slaves. Clinton’s great-grandfather acquired a “considerable” amount of property in…

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Students in an 11th-grade history class discuss the 1619 Project Oct. 24 at Manhattan’s Facing History School.

A Manhattan High School Reframes How Slavery Is Taught Using The New York Times’s 1619 Project

By News & Current Affairs, Reparations

By The 74 — Jeremias Mata started his junior year thinking he’d already learned everything he needed to know about slavery. “When I found out I was going to learn about slavery , I was like, ‘Urgh … again?’” said Mata, 16, sitting in his 11th-grade history class at the Facing History School in Manhattan’s Hell’s Kitchen. Over time, he’d connected slavery with hopelessness and a certain simplicity — that many…

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Georgetown University

Will America’s Universities Point The Way Towards Reparations For Slavery?

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

By Evan Gerstmann, Forbes — Georgetown University recently announced that it plans to raise around $400,000 a year to pay for reparations. They would go to the descendants of enslaved people who were exploited by Jesuit plantations and who were eventually sold to bring revenue to the university. A number of other universities, including Princeton Theological Seminary, have also announced plans for reparations. The moral case for reparations is easy to grasp….

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Princeton Theological Seminary.

$27M for slavery reparations ‘not enough,’ Princeton seminary students say. They want $120M more.

By Reparations

By Kelly Heyboer — Princeton Theological Seminary pledged last week to use $27.6 million of its endowment to pay reparations for the school’s historic ties to slavery, believed to be the largest amount ever paid by a school to atone for benefiting from the slave trade. The school’s black student association says it’s “a great start, but not enough.” The Association of Black Seminarians at Princeton Theological Seminary — a student…

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Students at Concord Middle School study the abolitionist movement from a local perspective with artifacts provided by the Concord Museum.

Americans show spotty knowledge about the history of slavery but acknowledge its enduring effects

By News & Current Affairs, Reparations

By Emily Guskin, Scott Clement and Joe Heim, The Washington Post — Americans have spotty knowledge of central facts about the history of slavery in the United States, although younger adults have an edge over their elders, according to a Washington Post-SSRS poll. Even so, a solid majority say the legacy of slavery affects American society today, including majorities across racial, partisan and generational lines. The Post-SSRS poll quizzed a random…

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