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Policing Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Sonia Pruitt

A Message on Policing Respectability

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Sonia Pruitt (Chair of the National Black Police Association) — Yesterday morning, I received a text message from a friend, who is also in law enforcement. The text contained a link to a news story, and the lede read “William Barr Says Those Who Don’t Show More Respect to Cops May Not Get Police Protection.” The next text from my friend read, “How horrible is this….” After I read the story, I felt…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Bloomberg’s Apology – Sorry Doesn’t Always Make it Right

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Billionaire Mike Bloomberg entered the already-crowded Democratic presidential primary with a splash. His ad buy of about $35 million represents more than half of what the other dozen or so candidates have spent on the campaign so far. His $54.6 billion net worth (according to Forbes) means he has deep pockets and virtually unlimited funds to spend on a campaign. Some think that he can…

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Terri L. Crawford with Senator Nina Turner

Protecting Democracy – An Interview with Sen. Nina Turner

By Editors' Choice

By Terri L. Crawford, JD, The Omaha Star — “Moreover, he shall speak for you to the people; and he will be as a mouth for you …” — Exodus 4:16 As the voice of the people, the Nebraska Democratic Party Black Caucus’ mission is to promote the involvement of Blacks in the political process and the activities of the party at the local, state, and national level. The Caucus…

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Members of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights October 31, 2012.

International Human Rights Bodies Provide a Case for Reparations

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Justin Hansford, ACLU — It is common for nations where mass atrocities have taken place to engage in the process of reparation and repair. This process happened in Germany after the Holocaust, South Africa after apartheid, and here in the United States, forty years after the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. As a result, international human rights bodies have sought to lend their expertise to the process, often by…

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Black Woman

With Reparations, We Must Demand Repair—and Heal Ourselves

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

Note: This is part two of this six-part series by YES! that explores the plurality of reparations that includes Black people’s spiritual and psychological healing. By David Ragland YES! — The first panel at the National Grassroots Reparations Convening in Ferguson, Missouri, earlier this month was titled “Spirituality, Healing and Reparations.” Facilitator Rev. Emma Jordan-Simpson, executive director at Fellowship of Reconciliation, the organization cohosting the four-day convening, opened the discussion…

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Slave Patrol

Slavery and the Origins of the American Police State

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

From the beginning, some Americans have been able to move more freely than others. By Ben Fountain, Medium — They were called patrollers or, variously, “paterollers,” “paddyrollers,” or “patterolls,” and they were meant to be part of the solution to Colonial America’s biggest problem, labor. Unlike Great Britain, which had a large, basically immobile peasant class that could be forced to work for subsistence wages, there weren’t enough cheap bodies…

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Prisons

American Gulag: Our Prisons Get More Oppressive by the Day

By Editors' Choice

By John W. Whitehead, CounterPunch — “The exile of prisoners to a distant place, where they can ‘pay their debt to society,’ make themselves useful, and not contaminate others with their ideas or their criminal acts, is a practice as old as civilization itself. The rulers of ancient Rome and Greece sent their dissidents off to distant colonies. Socrates chose death over the torment of exile from Athens. The poet…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Remembering the Watts Revolt: A Shared Condition, Consciousness and Commitment

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — The Anniversary of the 1965 Watts Revolt occurs in the context of a larger history of Black struggle, sacrifices and achievements: the assassination, sacrifice and martyrdom of Min. Malcolm X; the Selma March; the Voting Rights Act; the founding of our organization Us and the African American Cultural Center; and the introduction of the Black value system, the Nguzo Saba, which became the core values of…

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The Bloomington, Indiana Farmers’ Market.

White Supremacy Is Terrorism, Not a Difference of Opinion

By Commentaries/Opinions

An Indiana city learns that a weak response to white supremacists has predictable consequences. By Edward Burmila, The Nation — In big cities like Chicago, New York, or Los Angeles, a farmers’ market might not be a center of economic and social life. But in Bloomington, Indiana—with a population of 80,000 when Indiana University is in session—the farmers’ market has run for 45 consecutive years, and it’s a big deal.…

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Ronald E. Hampton

Who made the police both judge and jury?

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Ron Hampton — Big-city prosecutors and police chiefs recently attended a summit in Washington, D.C. held at the office of the Police Executive Research Forum, a think tank that advises police chiefs. But some prosecutors and police chiefs decided not to attend. The traditional police community is at it again in America. The police chiefs are claiming that newly elected representatives and progressive prosecutors along with some police chiefs…

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