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Racism Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Slave Patrol

Slavery and the Origins of the American Police State

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

From the beginning, some Americans have been able to move more freely than others. By Ben Fountain, Medium — They were called patrollers or, variously, “paterollers,” “paddyrollers,” or “patterolls,” and they were meant to be part of the solution to Colonial America’s biggest problem, labor. Unlike Great Britain, which had a large, basically immobile peasant class that could be forced to work for subsistence wages, there weren’t enough cheap bodies…

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Traveling While Black, a virtual reality documentary, discusses the agony and trepidation of a people moving through a country that has not fully accepted them.

Traveling While Black: behind the eye-opening VR documentary on racism in America

By Commentaries/Opinions

In the Emmy-nominated virtual reality project, viewers are given an immersive historical experience on the depressingly topical dangers of being black in America. By Dream McClinton, The Guardian — The theatre has luxurious red velvet upholstered seats, grand ceilings and gilded trimmings. The rows of chairs stretch back into the ostensible blackness, with light beaming from the projector room. Ahead, archival footage of stylish black travelers pack the screen as…

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FBI agents walk past a memorial outside the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh

Inside the White Supremacist Movement

By Editors' Choice

Michael German, a former federal agent, spent years infiltrating white supremacist groups. Here’s what he has to say about what’s going on now. By Joe Sexton, ProPublica — Late in 2017, ProPublica began writing about a California white supremacist group called the Rise Above Movement. Its members had been involved in violent clashes at rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, and several cities in California. They were proud of their violent handiwork,…

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Earl Ofari Hutchinson

Make Climate Change the New Civil Rights Battle

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson — Every Democratic Presidential contender is falling over each other to wear the mantle of top climate change warrior. With a few tweaks mainly involving how much to spend and what timetables to slap on implementation, their plans pretty much boil down to the same things. They want carbon caps, total emphasis on alternative energy sources, end to fossil fuel subsidies, bans on drilling on public…

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Ibram X. Kendi

How to Be an Anti-Racist, according to Ibram X Kendi

By Editors' Choice

In his new book, Kendi noted that “racial inequity is a problem of bad policy, not bad people.” By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire — Ibram X. Kendi admittedly once trivialized racism. The American University professor placed some of the blame for race relations in America on blacks. In a speech delivered in 2000, while he was still in high school, Kendi suggested African Americans were too busy blaming their…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Remembering the Watts Revolt: A Shared Condition, Consciousness and Commitment

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — The Anniversary of the 1965 Watts Revolt occurs in the context of a larger history of Black struggle, sacrifices and achievements: the assassination, sacrifice and martyrdom of Min. Malcolm X; the Selma March; the Voting Rights Act; the founding of our organization Us and the African American Cultural Center; and the introduction of the Black value system, the Nguzo Saba, which became the core values of…

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People explore the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

A brief history of the enduring phony science that perpetuates white supremacy

By Editors' Choice

By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post — The mysterious and chronic sickness had been afflicting slaves for years, working its way into their minds and causing them to flee from their plantations. Unknown in medical literature, its troubling symptoms were familiar to masters and overseers, especially in the South, where hundreds of enslaved people ran from captivity every year. On March 12, 1851, the noted physician Samuel A. Cartwright…

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The Bloomington, Indiana Farmers’ Market.

White Supremacy Is Terrorism, Not a Difference of Opinion

By Commentaries/Opinions

An Indiana city learns that a weak response to white supremacists has predictable consequences. By Edward Burmila, The Nation — In big cities like Chicago, New York, or Los Angeles, a farmers’ market might not be a center of economic and social life. But in Bloomington, Indiana—with a population of 80,000 when Indiana University is in session—the farmers’ market has run for 45 consecutive years, and it’s a big deal.…

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Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Ind., and a Democratic presidential candidate, greets people at Gibson’s Bookstore in Concord, N.H., on April 6

New Hampshire’s white liberals grapple with reparations

By News & Current Affairs, Reparations

By Julie Zauzmer, The Washington Post — CONCORD, N.H. — Over the past two years, a series of racist incidents has shaken New Hampshire, a state that’s nearly 95 percent white. A biracial 8-year-old was pushed off a picnic table with a rope around his neck in Claremont, an assault authorities are investigating as a hate crime. Teens sang “Let’s kill all the blacks” during a high school history class in Dover. A burned Confederate flag was…

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Counting money

What are Reparations, How Could They Happen, and Why Do They Matter?

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

Here’s what you need to know. By Jameelah Nasheed, Teen Vogue — For over 250 years, people of African descent were enslaved in the United States. Tricked and stolen from their homes, subjected to the brutal Middle Passage, and held in bondage for generations, emancipation was a welcome relief from slavery but didn’t fully undo the damage it causes, nor have the various hard-fought advances in civil rights that have…

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