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Slavery Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Celebration of the Abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia by the Colored People, in Washington, April 19, 1866,”

Since Emancipation, the United States Has Refused to Make Reparations for Slavery

By Reparations

But in 1862, the federal government doled out the 2020 equivalent of $23 million – NOT to the formerly enslaved but to their white enslavers. By Kali Holloway, The Nation — In 1870 a black woman named Henrietta Wood sued the white deputy sheriff who, nearly two decades earlier, kidnapped her from the free state of Ohio, illegally transported her to slaveholding Kentucky, and sold her into a life of enslavement that…

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Widener Library Harvard

There’s a black student loan-debt crisis and it needs an urgent solution. How about reparations?

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

Resolving the debt inequality between white and black students. Editor’s note: Black students are more likely than their peers to borrow money for college, struggle with repayment and default on student loans. With the debt problem for black students in particular reaching urgent levels, The Education Trust and The Hechinger Report have partnered on a series of op-eds to amplify the voices of people studying solutions to the black student…

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Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass Railed Against Economic Inequality

By Editors' Choice

The great abolitionist and former slave Frederick Douglass died 125 years ago. Jacobin published never-before-transcribed articles from Frederick Douglass’ Paper denouncing capitalism and economic inequality. By Matt Karp  — Everyone knows that Frederick Douglass, who died 125 years ago today, was a fierce opponent of slavery and a powerful champion of freedom, justice, and equality for all. But when it comes to Douglass’s concrete political views, things are more complicated. For…

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"Plight of the People" Illustration by Brian Washington.

Don’t pit slavery descendants against black immigrants. Racism doesn’t know the difference.

By Editors' Choice

An anti-African, anti-black-immigrant stance is shortsighted. As we celebrate Black History Month, we should not divide the black community. By Kevin Cokley, USA Today — Should African American/black identity be defined by descendants of slavery, or by African ancestry? This increasingly bitter debate in the black community is undermining the spirit of Black History Month. At the center of the conflict is the social movement referred to as ADOS, or the American…

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First slave auction in New Amsterdam.

The 1619 Project Debate with History of Slavery in New York City

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

By Alan Singer, HNN — Author’s note: “Represent NYC” is a weekly program produced by Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN). The show’s guests usually discuss topics like affordable housing, education policy and domestic violence. I was invited to discuss the New York Times’ 1619 Project and the long-term impact of slavery on New York and American society for a Black History Month broadcast. This post includes the questions I prepared to answer and notes…

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How the term “ADOS” buys into eugenics and anti-blackness

By Reparations, Video/Audio

“Culture, Class, and Consciousness” Host Jen Marie Pollard interviews J.A.M. Aiwuyor. Also See Understanding ADOS: The Movement to Hijack Black Identity and Weaken Black Unity By Jessica Ann Mitchell Aiwuyor — The term “American Descendants of Slavery” (ADOS) was created in 2016 to describe and distinctly separate Black Americans/African Americans from Black immigrant communities (Africans, Afro-Caribbeans, Afro-Latinos, etc). The movement claims to advocate for reparations on behalf of Black Americans….

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Stewart's Canal in Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument

Harriet Tubman and a National Legacy of Midnight Skies and Silent Stars

By Commentaries/Opinions, News & Current Affairs, Reparations

By Todd Lookingbill, HNN — Cynthia Erivo, who is nominated for best actress in a leading role in this weekend’s Oscars, stars in the gripping biopic “Harriet.” The movie, which tells the story of abolitionist Harriet Tubman, captures the miraculous physical, emotional, and spiritual journey of Harriet Tubman as she escapes from slavery to become an American icon. Of course, the horrors of slavery and the courage of the enslaved heroes that…

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USS Constitution. Cannons below decks.

Tale revealed of 8-year-old Black veteran of USS Constitution

By Reparations

By Brian MacQuarrie, The Boston Globe — David Debias passed explosives to the thundering guns of the USS Constitution on the night of Feb. 20, 1815. He heard US Marines shooting from the masts, watched razor-sharp splinters gash his comrades, and basked in the Constitution’s resounding victory over two British warships in its final battle, 180 miles southwest of Gibraltar. Debias was from Beacon Hill. He was 8 years old….

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Del. Wanika B. Fisher

Lawmaker Wants to Open a Dialogue About Reparations in Md.

By News & Current Affairs, Reparations

Del. Wanika Fisher (D-Prince George’s) wants the state to consider reparations for ancestors of Maryland slaves. By Hannah Gaskill, Maryland Matters — Maryland’s 250-year history of legal slavery came to an end when the practice was abolished on Nov. 1, 1864, nearly a year before the 13th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified. Del. Wanika B. Fisher (D-Prince George’s) says it’s finally time for Maryland lawmakers to have a talk…

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Sullivan’s Island

The Erasure of the History of Slavery at Sullivan’s Island

By News & Current Affairs, Reparations

By Roy E. Finkenbine, HNN — The history of slavery in America is, to a great extent, the history of erasure. For most of the century and a half since the Civil War ended, families, communities, churches, universities, banks, insurance companies, and a host of other institutions have gone out of their way to ignore past involvement in what Rev. Jim Wallis of Sojourners has labeled “America’s original sin.” I…

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