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Slavery Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Understanding ADOS: The Movement to Hijack Black Identity and Weaken Black Unity. By Jessica Ann Mitchell Aiwuyor.

Understanding ADOS: The Movement to Hijack Black Identity and Weaken Black Unity

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

By Jessica Ann Mitchell Aiwuyor — The term “American Descendants of Slavery” (ADOS) was created in 2016 to describe and distinctly separate Black Americans/African Americans from Black immigrant communities (Africans, Afro-Caribbeans, Afro-Latinos, etc). The movement claims to advocate for reparations on behalf of Black Americans. However, this movement’s leadership is linked to right-wing media and white supremacists that have a history of attempting to cause divisions in the Black community.

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African/African American Unity

Understanding the Division Between African Americans and Africans

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Dwayne Wong (Omowale) — The slave trade not only physically separated African Americans and Africans, but it created a psychological separation as well. At the root of this continued division between the two groups are misconceptions rooted in the narratives that each group has been given about themselves, as well as each other. As African people we continue to view ourselves and each other through the lens of the…

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Prospective students tour Georgetown University's campus in Washington., DC.

American Schools with Historical Ties to Slavery Consider Reparations

By Reparations

The Associated Press — American colleges and universities are increasingly discussing the idea of reparations linked to their historical ties to slavery. Until now, schools have created monuments, changed building names and issued public apologies – instead of providing money. But Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. and two other colleges recently announced financial commitments to people whose ancestors were slaves. The year 2019 marks the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first slave, in…

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Slavery

Blacks Were Enslaved Well into the 1960s

By Reparations

More than 100 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, there were black people in the Deep South who had no idea they were free. These people were forced to work, violently tortured, and raped. By Antoinette Harrell; as told to Justin Fornal, Vice — Historian and genealogist Antoinette Harrell has uncovered cases of African Americans still living as slaves 100 years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. The 57-year-old Louisiana…

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A circa 1830 illustration of a slave auction in America.

‘The Slaves Dread New Year’s Day the Worst’: The Grim History of January 1

By Reparations

The Dark History of New Year’s Day in American Slavery “Of all days in the year, the slaves dread New Year’s Day the worst of any,” one 1842 account explained. Here’s why. By Olivia B. Waxman, Times — Americans are likely to think of New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day as a time to celebrate the fresh start that a new year represents, but there is also a troubling…

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hospital bed

Reparations for slavery and genocide should be used to address health inequities

By Reparations

Health justice funds could be used to support Black and Indigenous health initiatives and provide mental and physical health services to deal with the impact of transgenerational trauma. By Roberta K. Timothy — As soon as I entered Elmina Castle (the dungeons) in Cape Coast in Ghana, I felt haunted by over 400 years of brutality and the enslavement and genocide of millions of African and Indigenous peoples. That violence still impacts…

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“Colfax Massacre” in Louisiana.

‘The War of Races’: How a hateful ideology echoes through American history

By Editors' Choice

From slavery to Reconstruction to Dylann Roof, the idea of “race war” has a long and bloody legacy in the United States. By Michael E. Miller, The Washington Post — It was high noon on Easter 1873 when the white mob came riding into Colfax. Five months earlier, Louisiana had held its second election since the end of the Civil War and the beginning of black male suffrage. But some…

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Sydney Labat, 24, and 14 of her Tulane University classmates posed at the Whitney Plantation in Wallace, La.

Med students send message with plantation photo: We are our ancestors’ wildest dreams

By Editors' Choice

More than a dozen medical students from Tulane University posed at the former slave quarters in the hopes of inspiring others. By Mohammed Syed and Suzanne Ciechalski — It wasn’t by chance that more than a dozen black medical students dressed in white coats and posed outside the slave quarters of a Louisiana plantation. Russell Ledet and classmates from Tulane University planned the trip and photos at the Whitney Plantation…

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President Reagan signs the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which granted reparations to Japanese Americans

Another way to look at reparations

By Reparations

By Edna Whittier, The Roanoke Times — In 1988, President Reagan signed the Civil Liberties Act to compensate Japanese Americans who were in internment camps during World War II. Offering a formal apology it paid $20,000 to each surviving victim and their heirs. In 2004, the State of Virginia established the Brown v. Board of Education Scholarship fund setting aside $1 million (with another $1 million contributed by philanthropist John…

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Leaders for the Union for Reform Judaism

Major Jewish Denomination Votes To Support Reparations For Slavery

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

The Union for Reform Judaism is calling for a study on reparations to redress the continuing effects of slavery and systemic racism against Black Americans. By Carol Kuruvilla, Huff Post — The Reform movement, America’s largest Jewish denomination, has passed a resolution supporting the need to make reparations for slavery. The resolution, approved by delegates to The Union for Reform Judaism’s biennial meeting on Friday, supports the creation of a…

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