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Culture Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Member of parliament and musician Bobi Wine says there are still 40 million people living under oppression, and domination, and under dictatorship in Uganda.

Jamaica: Uganda Activist Bobi Wine Says He Is Still State Enemy

By | Editors' Choice

The politician and freedom fighter said reggae music has helped to influence him to fight against colonial afflictions while growing up in the ghettos of Uganda. By teleSur — Member of parliament, freedom fighter and artist Bobi Wine traveled 36 hours to Jamaica, the politician says, to be able to spread his musical message to his fellow Ugandans and the rest of the world. Bobi Wine made the remark while…

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Reparations for Black People Should Include Rest

Reparations for Black People Should Include Rest

By | Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

Illustration by azzeazy Just as sleep deprivation was used as a means to control slaves, the modern-day “sleep gap” weighs down many Black people today. By Janine Francois, Broadly — What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore…” asks Langston Hughes in the haunting lines of his poem, “Harlem.” Written nearly 70 years ago, Hughes’ words remain…

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Get Out: Toward an Honest Commitment to Racial Justice

By | Commentaries/Opinions

By David J. Harris, Houston Institute Executive Director — Several weeks ago the Boston Globe published an opinion piece by editorial and staff writer David Scharfenberg in which he called for an “honest” commitment to racial integration. He dismissed the “gauzy 1963 version” of integration, insisted that “harping too much” on its virtues “can feel paternalistic,” and lamented the “disastrous busing experiment of the 1970s” which proved that “forced integration…simply doesn’t work.” Even so,…

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Achilles slaying Penthesilea. Detail from an amphora, 530-525 BCE.

When Homer envisioned Achilles, did he see a black man?

By | Commentaries/Opinions

Black Achilles — The Greeks didn’t have modern ideas of race. Did they see themselves as white, black – or as something else altogether? By Tim Whitmarsh, Aeon — Few issues provoke such controversy as the skin-colour of the Ancient Greeks. Last year in an article published in Forbes, the Classics scholar Sarah Bond at the University of Iowa caused a storm by pointing out that many of the Greek statues that…

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Julian Marley, son of late reggae icon Bob Marley, celebrates his father's 69th birthday at the National Stadium in Kingston, 2014.

UNESCO Adds Reggae Music to Global Cultural Heritage List

By | News & Current Affairs

Reggae was often championed as a music of the oppressed, with lyrics addressing sociopolitical issues, imprisonment and inequality. By TeleSUR — Reggae music – whose calm, lilting grooves found international fame thanks to artists like Bob Marley – has won a coveted spot on the United Nations’ list of global cultural treasures. UNESCO, the world body’s cultural and scientific agency, added the genre that originated in Jamaica to its collection of “intangible…

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Image courtesy of Community Movement Builders (CMB)

Gentrification: The New “Negro Removal” Program

By | Vantage Point Articles

Displacing Black People and Culture, Gentrification: The New “Negro Removal” Program A Call for an Emergency Summit. Vantage Point by Dr. Ron Daniels — Gentrification has emerged as a major threat to Black communities that have been centers for Black business/economic development, cultural and civic life for generations. Gentrification has become the watch-word for the displacement of Black people and culture. Gentrification is the “Negro Removal Program” of the…

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‘Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor’ by William Halsall (1882). Pilgrim Hall Museum

Why the Pilgrims were actually able to survive

By | Commentaries/Opinions

By Peter C. Mancall, The Conversation — Sometime in the autumn of 1621, a group of English Pilgrims who had crossed the Atlantic Ocean and created a colony called New Plymouth celebrated their first harvest. They hosted a group of about 90 Wampanoags, their Algonquian-speaking neighbors. Together, migrants and Natives feasted for three days on corn, venison and fowl. In their bountiful yield, the Pilgrims likely saw a divine hand…

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The first of the century, the extensive history provides an in-depth look at the voices and bodies that shaped the century.

Author Releases Century’s ‘Most Extensive Pan-African History’

By | Reparations

“African history is considered rather unimportant, but the history of the African diaspora isn’t considered at all,” Hakim Adi said. By teleSur — “Pan-Africanism: A History” a recently released book written by Professor Hakim Adi is seeking to explore and create discussion about Pan-Africanism around the world, a topic the author says often goes undiscussed. From the early 1900’s til now, in his new book “Pan-Africanism: A History” Professor Hakim Adi explores…

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Garifuna Coalition USA

New York-based Group to Celebrate Garifuna Heritage

By | News & Current Affairs

The month-long celebrations will give the people in New York City a chance to recognize and appreciate Garifuna history and traditions. The New York City-based Garifuna Coalition USA, Inc, is marking the month of May as the Garifuna-America heritage month, to commemorate the 221st anniversary of the forced displacement of the Garifuna people by the British from the St. Vincent and the Grenadines on March 11th, 1797, and their settlement…

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Brazilian rapper Nega Gizza attends the launching of her bid for the country's October elections in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil May 8, 2018

Afro-Brazilian Candidates Seek to Prolong Marielle’s Legacy

By | News & Current Affairs

They represent Favela Front of Brazil, a political movement attempting to unify the voting power of favelas and other poor black neighborhoods historically overlooked and underrepresented in Brazilian politics. By teleSUR — Let’s have a round of applause for our companion Marielle, who was one of our greatest supporters in this process,” Afro-Brazilian filmmaker Anderson Quack, who is running for Congress, told a cheering crowd of nearly 200 people assembled late Tuesday…

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