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History Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

“Wilmington on Fire” panelists discuss white supremacy, reparations, and why your vote matters

“Wilmington on Fire” panelists discuss white supremacy, reparations, and why your vote matters

By Reparations

The conversation spans the width of various touchy topics—the 1898 Coup’s lingering debt, the “trend” of the Black Lives Matter movement, the responsibility of white people—and each panelist offers their thoughtful responses, bolstered by their years of research and experience. By Cierra Noffke, UNCW — On the evening of September 15, a virtual crowd gathered around monitors or cell phones to listen to a group of activists answer questions inspired by…

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Donald Yacovone

How Textbooks Taught White Supremacy

By Commentaries/Opinions

A historian steps back to the 1700s and shares what’s changed and what needs to change. By Liz Mineo, The Harvard Gazaette — Historian Donald Yacovone, an associate at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research and a 2013 winner of the W.E.B. Du Bois medal, was researching a book on the legacy of the antislavery movement when he came across some old history school textbooks that stopped him cold —…

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Black Labor Day Forum: The Theft of Black Labor and Extraction of Black Wealth

By Events, NAARC Posts, News & Current Affairs, Reparations

Streamed September 7, 2020 — The Institute of the Black World 21st Century in collaboration with the National African American Reparations Commission present a Black Labor Day Forum “The Theft of Black Labor and Extraction of Black Wealth: How the Exploitation and Oppression of Black People Built Capitalist America – The Case for Reparations and HR-40”. Participants include Don Rojas, Nkechi Taifa, Esq., Dr. Ron Daniels, Bill Fletcher, Dr. Julianne…

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Theodore Roosevelt was one of many U.S. presidents who was racist.

Presidents have a long history of condescension, indifference and outright racism towards Black Americans

By Editors' Choice

President Woodrow Wilson told Black leaders, ‘Segregation is not a humiliation but a benefit, and ought to be so regarded by you gentlemen.’ He was one in a long line of racist American presidents. By Stephen A. Jones and Eric Freedman — The fury over racial injustice that erupted in the wake of George Floyd’s killing has forced Americans to confront their history. That’s unfamiliar territory for most Americans, whose…

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Pharrell Williams: America's Past and Present Are Racist. We Deserve a Black Future

Pharrell Williams: America’s Past and Present Are Racist. We Deserve a Black Future

By Editors' Choice

America’s past was shaped by slavery. To live up to American’s ideals, we must trust in a Black vision of the future, Pharrell Williams writes. Pharrell Williams with Michael Harriot, TIME — On April 26, 1607, three ships carrying 105 men and boys landed on the eastern shore of what would come to be called America. They called themselves “adventurers.” But they had no interest in liberty or justice, and…

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The Red, Black and Green Universal African Flag

The Red, Black & Green: Fly the Flag and Fight for the Exoneration of Marcus Garvey

By Marcus Garvey, Vantage Point Articles

Vantage Point Articles & Essays By Dr. Ron Daniels (Originally Published July 2015) — August 17 will mark the 128th birthday of the Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey, the visionary Jamaican-born leader who built the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL) into the largest mass movement for liberation in the history of Africans in America and perhaps the world!…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Black Women Rising Despite Obstacles

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Women won the right to vote a century ago. On August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment passed. The white women’s equal rights struggle began in 1776, though, when Abigail Adams, the wife of our second president and member of the constitution-drafting Continental Congress, sent her husband a letter. She urged him to “remember the ladies.” She further wrote, “All men would be tyrants if they could….

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The Georgian mansion and adjacent slave quarters were once part of a 500-acre farm just north of Boston.

Royall House and Slave Quarters

By Reparations

Preserving black history as “an act of liberation” By Nell Porter Brown, Harvard Magazine — Isaac Royall Sr. built a fortune on his Antigua sugar plantation and returned to Boston in 1737 to settle into an opulent Georgian mansion in what’s now Medford, Massachusetts. To operate the surrounding 500-acre farm, enormous by colonial-era standards, he also shipped north across the ocean “a parcel of negroes.” Those 27 enslaved people were plucked…

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Congressman John Lewis — SNCC organizers, Greenwood.

The Other John Lewis I Will Always Remember

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson — The instant the news flashed that Congressman John Lewis died the expected and much deserved avalanche of tributes poured in from all corners. Trump’s tribute was in that avalanche. The tributes all pretty much followed the same pattern. Lewis was praised as a civil rights icon, courageous, unremitting, and a historic example of how a life devoted to civil rights can result in monumental changes…

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John R. Lewis, a civil rights titan and a formidable member of Congress for three decades, died at the age of 80 on July 17.

John Lewis, front-line civil rights leader and eminence of Capitol Hill, dies at 80

By News & Current Affairs

By Laurence I. Barrett, The Washington Post — John Lewis, a civil rights leader who preached nonviolence while enduring beatings and jailings during seminal front-line confrontations of the 1960s and later spent more than three decades in Congress defending the crucial gains he had helped achieve for people of color, has died. He was 80. His death was announced in statements from his family and from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi…

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