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Black History Archives - Page 2 of 5 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968

The Language of the Unheard: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Social Democracy

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Robert Greene II, The Nation — Gone was the optimism of 1963. It had been replaced by a sense of disillusionment, a sense of urgency that America was about to lose the last chance to have its soul.” This was how Jet magazine described the climax of the Poor People’s Campaign, which reached Washington, DC, in the tumultuous summer of 1968. For Jet and for many early civil-rights activists, the Poor People’s Campaign…

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Lonnie Bunch is director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington.

How Lonnie Bunch came to lead the Museum of African American History

By News & Current Affairs

By Susannah Hutcheson, USA Today — Our series “How I became a …” digs into the stories of accomplished and influential people, finding out how they got to where they are in their careers. As the director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., Lonnie Bunch spends his days helping Americans understand history that has both brought us together and divided us. The founding…

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Donald Trump and Frederick Douglass

Biographer explains the lessons of Frederick Douglass: ‘White supremacy does not die — it revives in new forms’

By Commentaries/Opinions

Biographer David Blight on Douglass’ lessons for us: “White supremacy does not die … it revives in new forms.”   By Chauncey DeVega, Salon — Black History Month, which has just concluded, was first established as Negro History Week in 1926 by historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. February was chosen in particular because it contained two very important dates: Feb….

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WBAI Fund Drive Edition of Vantage Point Radio: Stokely Carmichael and Angela Davis

By Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

RECORDED 2/25/19 On this WBAI Fund Drive Edition of Talk Back – Vantage Point Radio we hear excerpts from this episode’s premium and commentary from the Professor Dr. Ron Daniels. The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975 DVD “Addressing what might be thought of as standard historical and contemporary subjects with startlingly radical means. . . . Göran Hugo Olsson’s Black Power Mixtape 1967–1975 is a collage of archival footage recorded in…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Four Hundred Years and We Still Ain’t Clear: Distortions of Black History

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — According to some historians, Afrodescendents first entered these united states in 1619 off the coast of Virginia. If we believe that narrative, Afrodescendents have been in this country for 400 years. If the people who were kidnapped and brought here had to tell the story, would they tell the same one? Would they say that we came before Columbus? That some of us might have…

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Dr. Carter G. Woodson

Remembering and Re-Reading Woodson: Envisioning an Emancipatory Education

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — Clearly, in this important month and historical moment of celebrating Black History thru reflective remembrance and recommitment to ever-deeper study and emancipatory practice, our minds easily turn to the writings and life work of the father of Black History Month, Dr. Carter G. Woodson (1875–1950). For it is Dr. Woodson who framed and laid the foundation for our celebration of Black History Month, having given…

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Bashir Muhammad Akinyele

Newark Activist On Black History Month: Where Do We Go From Here?

By Commentaries/Opinions

“When we really unify with one another, fight for self-determination, vote, and coalition build, our movements become much stronger.” By Bashir Muhammad Akinyele — With the tragic killings of Blackmen, Blackwomen, Black children, and Black youth going on in African America on a daily basis, we must force our people, and the world, to understand that neglected and failed American policies to eradicate racism, Black self-hatred, poverty, drugs, high incarceration…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Moments and Migrations

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — Every year the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) choses a theme for Black History Month.  This year they have chosen, Black Migrations emphasizing “the movement of people of African descent to new destinations and subsequently to new social realities.”  Their theme is important, especially when we think of the “Great Migration”, the time after World War I when Black folk fled…

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The Library of Congress has acquired “The Life of Omar ibn Said,” the only known memoir written in Arabic by an African enslaved in the United States

When few enslaved people in the United States could write, one man wrote his memoir in Arabic

By Commentaries/Opinions

The 1831 narrative by Omar ibn Said is the only known surviving slave account of its kind. By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post — As a slave, he was called “Morro” or “Uncle Moreau.” A dignified man in his 60s, he was small in stature, unfit for hard work and had been enslaved for almost a quarter-century. He spoke limited English. But his real name was Omar ibn Said….

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The coronation of King Henry

Inside the Kingdom of Hayti, ‘the Wakanda of the Western Hemisphere’

By Editors' Choice

By Marlene Daut, University of Virginia — Marvel’s blockbuster “Black Panther,” which recently became the first superhero drama to be nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award, takes place in the secret African Kingdom of Wakanda. The Black Panther, also known as T’Challa, rules over this imaginary empire – a refuge from the colonialists and capitalists who have historically impoverished the real continent of Africa. But fans of the box-office hit might not…

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