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Black History Archives - Page 4 of 9 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

artin Luther King Jr. stayed in the back bedroom of this house

N.J. historic preservation officials insult the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.

By Commentaries/Opinions

N.J.’s refusal to list the Camden home where MLK plotted his first protest on the state’s Register of Historic Places insults the civil rights leader’s legacy. By Linn Washington Jr., — A significant “first” usually merits the designation of historic. For example, the first formal protest against racial discrimination by civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in June 1950 — an action that produced King’s first lawsuit…

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Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman and President Barack Obama

How Black Lives Matter Is Changing What Students Learn During Black History Month

By News & Current Affairs

Black History Month lessons have been ‘stagnant’ for years, educators say. Here’s how some teachers are trying to change things. By Olivia B. Waxman, TIME — Freshman year can make anyone feel lost, but Seattle teen Janelle Gary felt especially lost when she entered high school in 2015. At home, she watched a wave of gentrification drive change in the historically black Central District neighborhood, and at school, where she was one…

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For decades, structures such as Rosenwald schools were deemed insignificant.

The Fight to Preserve African-American History

By Editors' Choice

Activists and preservationists are changing the kinds of places that are protected—and what it means to preserve them. By Casey Cep, The New Yorker — No one knows what happened to Gabriel’s body. Born into slavery the year his country declared its freedom, he trained as a plantation blacksmith and was hired out to foundries in Richmond, Virginia, where he befriended other enslaved people. Together, they absorbed, from the revolutionary…

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Martin Luther King Jr.

Four Speeches by Dr. King That Can Still Guide Us Today

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Alan Singer, HNN — Author’s note: On January 9, 2020 I delivered the Martin Luther King, Jr. tribute lecture at the Uniondale Public Library in Uniondale, New York. The presentation focused on four speeches by Dr. King that illustrate his concerns and suggest what his views on the world today might have been. Thank you for inviting me to speak today at the Uniondale (NY) Public Library Martin Luther King,…

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Doris Miller was awarded for his heroism during the Pearl Harbor attack.

Doris Miller to become first black sailor to have a Navy aircraft carrier named in his honor

By News & Current Affairs

A black mess attendant was a Pearl Harbor hero. Now an aircraft carrier will have his name. By Kim Bellware, The Washington Post — It was just before 8 a.m. aboard the USS West Virginia, anchored in Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, when the first torpedo hit. Mess Attendant 2nd Class Doris Miller was deep into the day’s laundry when the blast sent one of his lieutenants racing to…

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‘Unfortunately for us, there is no William Monroe Trotter in 2020. Nor is there a Boston Guardian demanding that the black press “hold a mirror up to nature”.’

The radical black newspaper that declared ‘none are free unless all are free’

By Editors' Choice

In 1901, William Trotter founded an other Guardian – the Boston Guardian – to ‘hold a mirror up to nature’. We could use something similar today, writes Kerri Greenidge. By Kerri Greenidge — In 1901, William Monroe Trotter founded the Guardian newspaper in Boston. At that time, the more famous Guardian – the one you’re now reading – was published in Manchester, and Trotter had never traveled further than Chillicothe, Ohio.…

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Slavery

Blacks Were Enslaved Well into the 1960s

By Reparations

More than 100 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, there were black people in the Deep South who had no idea they were free. These people were forced to work, violently tortured, and raped. By Antoinette Harrell; as told to Justin Fornal, Vice — Historian and genealogist Antoinette Harrell has uncovered cases of African Americans still living as slaves 100 years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. The 57-year-old Louisiana…

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School Books

Why Colleges Need a Required Class in African American History

By Editors' Choice

By David Barber, HNN — Just before the Thanksgiving break, flyers appeared on the University of Tennessee at Martin campus asking if students were “PROUD TO BE WHITE?” and suggesting that if they were, they should “Contact Like-Minded People” – giving a website address. A second flyer read, “HEY, WHITE MAN … JUST WHAT IS IT GONNA TAKE TO GET YOU TO FIGHTBACK?” Under this headline the flyer depicted in…

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William Monroe Trotter.

The Legacy of a Radical Black Newspaperman

By Editors' Choice

William Monroe Trotter rejected the view that racial equality could come in stages. By Casey Cep, The New Yorker — The mustache had to go. A classic nineteenth-century handlebar, it was far too recognizable, so William Monroe Trotter shaved it off. In addition to the disguise, he arranged to take a cooking class in his boarding house, evincing a sudden interest that would have surprised his wife, mother, and two…

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Still on This Journey: Maurice Mitchell hosts a conversation with Dr. Ron Daniels.

Still on This Journey: Maurice Mitchell hosts a conversation with Dr. Ron Daniels

By Events, News & Current Affairs

December 9, 2019, Brooklyn, NY — Dr. Ron Daniels stopped by Automatic Studios in Brooklyn, New York for a signing of his new book Still on This Journey: The Vision and Mission of Dr. Ron Daniels and conversation with the event’s host Maurice Mitchell, National Director of the Working Families Party (WFP). Maurice Mitchell on Dr. Daniels and book “Dr. Ron Daniels possesses a rare amalgam of skills, wry wit,…

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