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Black History Archives - Page 3 of 6 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Bashir Muhammad Akinyele

Newark Activist On Black History Month: Where Do We Go From Here?

By Commentaries/Opinions

“When we really unify with one another, fight for self-determination, vote, and coalition build, our movements become much stronger.” By Bashir Muhammad Akinyele — With the tragic killings of Blackmen, Blackwomen, Black children, and Black youth going on in African America on a daily basis, we must force our people, and the world, to understand that neglected and failed American policies to eradicate racism, Black self-hatred, poverty, drugs, high incarceration…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Moments and Migrations

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — Every year the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) choses a theme for Black History Month.  This year they have chosen, Black Migrations emphasizing “the movement of people of African descent to new destinations and subsequently to new social realities.”  Their theme is important, especially when we think of the “Great Migration”, the time after World War I when Black folk fled…

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The Library of Congress has acquired “The Life of Omar ibn Said,” the only known memoir written in Arabic by an African enslaved in the United States

When few enslaved people in the United States could write, one man wrote his memoir in Arabic

By Commentaries/Opinions

The 1831 narrative by Omar ibn Said is the only known surviving slave account of its kind. By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post — As a slave, he was called “Morro” or “Uncle Moreau.” A dignified man in his 60s, he was small in stature, unfit for hard work and had been enslaved for almost a quarter-century. He spoke limited English. But his real name was Omar ibn Said….

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The coronation of King Henry

Inside the Kingdom of Hayti, ‘the Wakanda of the Western Hemisphere’

By Editors' Choice

By Marlene Daut, University of Virginia — Marvel’s blockbuster “Black Panther,” which recently became the first superhero drama to be nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award, takes place in the secret African Kingdom of Wakanda. The Black Panther, also known as T’Challa, rules over this imaginary empire – a refuge from the colonialists and capitalists who have historically impoverished the real continent of Africa. But fans of the box-office hit might not…

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Lavinia Baker and her five surviving children after the lynching of her husband and baby on Feb. 22, 1898.

Post office to be named for black postmaster who was lynched in 1898

By News & Current Affairs

Frazier B. Baker was the first black postmaster in Lake City, South Carolina. By Associated Press — LAKE CITY, S.C. — A South Carolina town’s post office will be named in honor of its first black postmaster, Frazier B. Baker, who was lynched in 1898 after he refused to resign. U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., introduced a bill to rename the office after Baker, saying it would ensure that his…

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Left: Joe Stewart and Patricia Bayonne-Johnson, both descendants of people sold as slaves by Georgetown University, arrive to hear about moves aimed at acknowledging and encouraging dialogue about the Jesuit-run university's ties to slavery in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 1, 2016

UN panel says the U.S. owes reparations to African-Americans

By Reparations

By Eugene Mason, PBS — The United States owes African-Americans reparations for slavery, a recent report by a United Nations-affiliated group said. The UN Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent said that compensation is necessary to combat the disadvantages caused by 245 years of legally allowing the sale of people based on the color of their skin. The U.N. group warned that the U.S. has not confronted its legacy of “racial terrorism.”…

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When Mandela's Predecessor Toured the Us to Expose Segregation Back Home

When Mandela’s Predecessor Toured the Us to Expose Segregation Back Home

By Editors' Choice

Solomon Plaatje, an early ANC leader, came to America in 1921 to expose the growing number of race laws back home. By Matthew Blackman, OZY — A short, well-dressed 44-year-old man of the southern African Barolong tribe stood at the American border near Niagara Falls holding Canadian passport No. 79551. It stated the bearer was a British national and a resident of Toronto. In fact, he was Solomon Plaatje, the…

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Empire Windrush migrants arrive at Tilbury in 1948.

‘There were Africans in Britain before the English came here’

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

How Staying Power shook British history. When it was published in 1984 Staying Power vividly captured the struggle for black British identity. Nearly 35 years on it still has lessons to teach. By Gary Younge, The Guardian — “The very serious function of racism is distraction,” Toni Morrison argued in a lecture in Portland, Oregon, in 1975: It keeps you from doing your work. It keeps you explaining, over and…

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