Skip to main content
Tag

Black Women Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Black-Lives-Matter-Cyclist-Protester-910x512

What George Floyd Changed

By Editors' Choice

By POLITICO MAGAZINE — The protests over one man’s death touched far more aspects of American life than just criminal justice. Seven thinkers reflect on how America is (and isn’t) different now. In the year since George Floyd died under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer, the explosive waves of national protest that followed have taken on almost a settled meaning: They were calls for police reform, and for…

Read More
prison-photo-image-family-incarcerated-910x512

My Child Is Incarcerated. One Second in This Unjust System Is Too Much.

By Editors' Choice

By Esther Hernández— For several years, I have met weekly with a remarkable group of mothers and one father who, like me, are fighting for the release of their adult children from Chicago-area prisons. We call ourselves the Mothers of the Kidnapped. My new sisters and brother, all in a group no parent wants to join, speak powerfully to the loss of their children and to the agony of being caught up…

Read More

Vantage Point: Black Women Voters and the Black Freedom Struggle With Special Guest Barbara Arnwine, Esq.

By Black Women Making History, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

March 29, 2021 — On this Women’s History Month edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with special guest Barbara Arnwine, Esq. Topic Black Women Voters and the Black Freedom Struggle Special Guest Phenomenal Black Woman: Barbara Arnwine, Esq., President/Founder, Transformative Justice Coalition, Washington, DC Ways to listen Live (Radio) — Mondays 3-4PM on WBAI, 99.5FM, Pacifica Network, New York Livestream (Online) — Click Here…

Read More

Vantage Point: The Power of Art and Cultural Resistance – by Michele Voltaire Marcelin

By Black Women Making History, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

March 22, 2021 — On this Women’s History Month edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with special guest Michele Voltaire Marcelin. Topic The Power of Art and Cultural Resistance Special Guest Phenomenal Black Woman: Michele Voltaire Marcelin, Haitian American Artist and Author of Witness Resistance and Lost and Found, Brooklyn, NY Ways to listen Live (Radio) — Mondays 3-4PM on WBAI, 99.5FM, Pacifica Network,…

Read More

Vantage Point Radio: Caribbean Women and Reparatory Justice by Dr. Verene Shepherd

By Black Women Making History, Reparations, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Vantage Point March 15, 2021 — On this Women’s History Month edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with special guest Dr. Verene Shepherd. Topic Caribbean Women and Reparatory Justice Special Guest Phenomenal Black Woman: Dr. Verene Shepherd, Director Center for Reparations Research, Kingston, Jamaica Ways to listen Live (Radio) — Mondays 3-4PM on WBAI, 99.5FM, Pacifica Network, New York Livestream (Online) — Click Here…

Read More
harry-meghan-markle-oprah-interview-royals

White Monarchy Nearly Killed Meghan Markle. It Has Killed Countless Others.

By Editors' Choice

By Eisa Nefertari Ulen — Racism enters Black bodies. Enduring racial discrimination lowers heart rate variability and increases heart rates. Racism is fight or flight. The internalization of anti-Black racism accelerates biological aging by shortening telomeres, the protein DNA structures at the end of each chromosome, and so racism causes early death. Black folk carry the allostatic load of racism, meaning the stress of racism is a burden so great, it disrupts the immune, endocrine…

Read More
Nkechi Taifa

Sister Search: Remembering my Howard University Roots During this Women’s History Month

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Nkechi Taifa — To say I was an “interesting” teenager is an understatement. Once upon a revolutionary time, I was a Black Power teen who lived in the once Chocolate City but went to an all-white, all girl high school. I hung out, however, with Black Panthers and brothers from the Nam, recited poetry, attended organizing meetings for the first U.S.-based African Liberation Day, and celebrated Kwanzaa. And upon my high…

Read More
Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Celebrating Black Women’s History: Achievements, Strengths and Struggles

By Black Women in History, Commentaries/Opinions, Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — This year’s celebration of Black History Month II: Women’s Focus comes at a time of the pandemic COVID-19 and the continuing pathology of oppression. It is also a time of resistance, rising up and raising the battle cries: Black Women Rising; Black Men Rising; Black People Rising; No Justice, No Peace; and Liberation’s Coming From A Black and Beautiful Thing. And that Black and Beautiful…

Read More
Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Black Women’s Organizations Matter

By Black Women in History, Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — March is Women’s History Month, and this month is the perfect time to uplift the Black women’s organizations that make such an essential difference in our lives. Last year, both the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) and the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women (NANBPW) celebrated their 85th anniversary. Thanks to COVID, neither organization had the opportunity to celebrate in the way they…

Read More
Gretta Jackson

Woman Becomes First Black Owner of an Outback Steakhouse in Detroit After Starting As a Server

By Black Women in History, News & Current Affairs

By Cedric ‘BIG CED’ Thornton — A Black woman, who started as a part-time server, is now an owner of her very own Outback Steakhouse restaurant in Michigan, less than 20 years later. According to Fox2 Detroit, Gretta Jackson took a job as a part-time server job at an Outback in Southfield almost two decades ago to put some extra money in her pocket. She worked her way up to become the…

Read More
Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

What if Women Didn’t Talk?

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — Patriarchy baffles me as much as white supremacy does. How do the men, birthed by women, consider us inferior? When we raise our voices, we are irrational or hysterical. When we are emphatic, we are hostile. According to former Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori, we talk too much in meetings when we talk. Mori offered this weak excuse when questioned about the scarcity of women on…

Read More
While the G.I. Bill and other post-World War II policies helped to build a strong middle class, many of those benefits were not extended to black families—just one factor that led to the racial wealth gap seen today. (Photo: @LadyLSpeaks/Twitter)

1619, 1776, and Family Separation: How We Move Child Welfare Forward with Equity

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Dr. Sharon McDaniel— Dear President Biden and Vice President Harris, During the campaign, I saw your signs touting the phrase, “Our best days still lie ahead.” But what do “best days” look like for our children and families? As CEO of a nationally recognized kinship care service agency, a Black mother and a former child of the foster care system, I can say issues of racism remain problematic in child welfare services. I’ve dealt with the…

Read More