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Black Women Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Thank You, Black Women

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — When California governor Gavin Newsom woke up on Wednesday, September 15, 2021, I hope he fell to his knees and said, “Thank you, God, thank you, Black women.” To be sure, there are many others to thank, from the energized Chicanx/Latinx community to the Democrats who surged to the polls at the last minute. Some of the more prominent who thronged to his side were…

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U.S. Rep. Ayanna Pressley speaks as Reps. Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez look on during a press conference addressing remarks made by President Donald Trump earlier in the day, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on July 15, 2019.

How women of color in Congress are pushing a grassroots agenda

By Commentaries/Opinions

Despite roadblocks, “the Squad” has pushed progressive legislation, scrutinized the powerful, and changed the conversation around who gets to hold political power. By Sonali Kolhatkar, YES! — If Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential election victory was a political earthquake that shattered norms and expectations, the 2018 midterm wins by four women of color ought to be seen as a similarly earth-shattering occurrence. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts,…

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Black Woman

Google’s pledge to train 100k Black women in digital skills by 2022

By Editors' Choice

Google continues to build up its pipeline of Black talent with its latest ambitious initiative. By Njera Perkins— This story was originally published on Feb 15, 2021 by AfroTech. Last week, Grow With Google announced that it has established a new initiative to offer digital skills training to 100,000 Black women. This pledge to upskill Black job seekers is part of Google’s $15 million initiative announced back in June. Their goal now…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Rep. Cori Bush Is My Shero

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — Congresswoman Cori Bush (D-MO) was once homeless. She wrote movingly about sleeping with her babies in her car, with no place to go, nowhere to wash except a McDonald’s restroom, nowhere to exhale. She was homeless and working, and among a group that has coined the term “unhoused” to convey the pain of living without a home, belongings stuffed into garbage bags, hot food an elusive…

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Mary Smith, pictured near her home in Irving, Tex., quit her job to avoid going back to the office after the pandemic.

Many Black women felt relieved to work from home, free from microaggressions. Now they’re told to come back.

By Editors' Choice

By Natachi Onwuamaegbu, Washington Post — After seven years of corporate life, Mary Smith had a routine: putting extra effort into her hair (so as to not appear too Black) and her demeanor (ditto) and her clothes (you can probably guess). But once she got a taste of the work-from-home life during the pandemic, Smith knew she could never go back. Her scalp was free from constraining hairstyles, and she…

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What George Floyd Changed

By Editors' Choice

By POLITICO MAGAZINE — The protests over one man’s death touched far more aspects of American life than just criminal justice. Seven thinkers reflect on how America is (and isn’t) different now. In the year since George Floyd died under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer, the explosive waves of national protest that followed have taken on almost a settled meaning: They were calls for police reform, and for…

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My Child Is Incarcerated. One Second in This Unjust System Is Too Much.

By Editors' Choice

By Esther Hernández— For several years, I have met weekly with a remarkable group of mothers and one father who, like me, are fighting for the release of their adult children from Chicago-area prisons. We call ourselves the Mothers of the Kidnapped. My new sisters and brother, all in a group no parent wants to join, speak powerfully to the loss of their children and to the agony of being caught up…

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Vantage Point: Black Women Voters and the Black Freedom Struggle With Special Guest Barbara Arnwine, Esq.

By Black Women Making History, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

March 29, 2021 — On this Women’s History Month edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with special guest Barbara Arnwine, Esq. Topic Black Women Voters and the Black Freedom Struggle Special Guest Phenomenal Black Woman: Barbara Arnwine, Esq., President/Founder, Transformative Justice Coalition, Washington, DC Ways to listen Live (Radio) — Mondays 3-4PM on WBAI, 99.5FM, Pacifica Network, New York Livestream (Online) — Click Here…

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Vantage Point: The Power of Art and Cultural Resistance – by Michele Voltaire Marcelin

By Black Women Making History, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

March 22, 2021 — On this Women’s History Month edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with special guest Michele Voltaire Marcelin. Topic The Power of Art and Cultural Resistance Special Guest Phenomenal Black Woman: Michele Voltaire Marcelin, Haitian American Artist and Author of Witness Resistance and Lost and Found, Brooklyn, NY Ways to listen Live (Radio) — Mondays 3-4PM on WBAI, 99.5FM, Pacifica Network,…

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Vantage Point Radio: Caribbean Women and Reparatory Justice by Dr. Verene Shepherd

By Black Women Making History, Reparations, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Vantage Point March 15, 2021 — On this Women’s History Month edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with special guest Dr. Verene Shepherd. Topic Caribbean Women and Reparatory Justice Special Guest Phenomenal Black Woman: Dr. Verene Shepherd, Director Center for Reparations Research, Kingston, Jamaica Ways to listen Live (Radio) — Mondays 3-4PM on WBAI, 99.5FM, Pacifica Network, New York Livestream (Online) — Click Here…

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White Monarchy Nearly Killed Meghan Markle. It Has Killed Countless Others.

By Editors' Choice

By Eisa Nefertari Ulen — Racism enters Black bodies. Enduring racial discrimination lowers heart rate variability and increases heart rates. Racism is fight or flight. The internalization of anti-Black racism accelerates biological aging by shortening telomeres, the protein DNA structures at the end of each chromosome, and so racism causes early death. Black folk carry the allostatic load of racism, meaning the stress of racism is a burden so great, it disrupts the immune, endocrine…

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