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Black Women Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Black Girl Magic and the 2020 Election

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — For the sixth year in a row, Essence Magazine and the Black Women’s Roundtable have surveyed Black women about the issues that concern them most. Melanie Campbell, Convener of the Black Women’s Roundtable and President and CEO of the National Coalition for Black Civic Participation, summarizes the top concerns: “survival, safety, and stability.” Black women are concerned about the rise in hate crimes and the persistence…

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Global Book Launch Virtual Event: Black Power, Black Lawyer the Memoir of Nkechi Taifa

Global Book Launch Virtual Event: Black Power, Black Lawyer the Memoir of Nkechi Taifa

By News & Current Affairs

September 26, 2020, 12pm Noon EST — Join us for the virtual book release party of, Black Power, Black Lawyer: My Audacious Quest for Justice by Nkechi Taifa. Taifa’s memoir tells the story of the rebellious journey of a young sister growing up during the Black Power era and the social justice lawyer she becomes. Special Interview: Matsimela Mapfumo (Mark Thompson), Host of Make It Plain with Nkechi Taifa. Special…

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Harriet Tubman

University of Maryland renames women’s studies department after Harriet Tubman

By Commentaries/Opinions

Born a slave in Maryland, the famous abolitionist led dozens to freedom through the Underground Railroad. By Danielle Wallace, Fox News — The University of Maryland announced Friday it’s renaming the women’s studies department after Harriet Tubman – the 19-century abolitionist and famous female “conductor” on the Underground Railroad. “It is my honor to announce a major milestone in our university’s history: the first honorific naming of an academic department at UMD, the Harriet Tubman Department…

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Jarena Lee, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman were pioneering Black women leaders who championed equality in the church, politics, civic rights, and other areas of public life.

Black women are founders of American democracy. How will we live up to their ideals?

By Commentaries/Opinions

While too many Black were disenfranchised even after the 19th Amendment’s ratification a century ago, they never waited for permission before promoting their vision of fundamental rights. By Martha Jones, The Inquirer — When it comes to 21st-century politics, Black women are our founders. The double scourge of racism and sexism no longer defines American politics. The nomination of Sen. Kamala Harris to the Democrat’s VP slot, the more than…

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Five You Should Know: African American Suffragists

By Editors' Choice, People You Should Know

The women’s suffrage movement had many heroines who bravely fought for the rights of women in the United States. Here are the stories of five African American suffragists who helped women in America secure the right to vote. Source: NMAAHC — Mary Ann Shadd Cary (1823-1893) Mary Ann Shadd Cary was born in 1823 to parents dedicated to the abolition of slavery. Her parents taught her much about fighting for…

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Vantage Point: Black Women in the Suffrage Movement and the Founding of a Black Political Party

By News & Current Affairs, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Vantage Point Radio August 24, 2020 — On this edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with guests Dr. E. Faye Williams and Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons, Ph.D. Topics The Untold Story of Black Women in the Suffrage Movement Reflections on the Founding of a Black Political Party  The Professor on the Soap Box Guests Dr. E. Faye Williams, National President/CEO, National Congress of Black Women,…

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Vantage Point: Will Kamala Harris Help or Hurt the Biden Ticket?

By News & Current Affairs, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Vantage Point Radio August 17, 2020 — On this Marcus Garvey Universal African Flag Day edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with guests Rev. Mark Thompson and Earl Ofari Hutchinson. Topics Will Kamala Harris Help or Hurt the Biden Ticket? Fly the Red, Black and Green Flag August 17th, Marcus Garvey’s Birthday The Professor on the Soap Box Guests Rev. Mark Thompson Host, Make…

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A civil rights marcher suffering from exposure to tear gas holds an unconscious Amelia Boynton Robinson after mounted police officers attacked marchers in Selma, Ala., as they were beginning a 50-mile march to Montgomery to protest race discrimination in voter registration.

The Voting Rights Act was signed 55 years ago. Black women led the movement behind it.

By Commentaries/Opinions

By N’dea Yancey-Bragg, USA Today — In March of 1965, Amelia Boynton Robinson walked with hundreds of other protesters across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Boynton Robinson, who planned the march from Selma to the Alabama capital of Montgomery along with Rev. C.T. Vivian and others, was struck with a baton by Alabama state troopers that day. “They came from the right, the left, the front and started beating people,” she told The Crisis, the official magazine of the NAACP, in…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Black Women Rising Despite Obstacles

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Women won the right to vote a century ago. On August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment passed. The white women’s equal rights struggle began in 1776, though, when Abigail Adams, the wife of our second president and member of the constitution-drafting Continental Congress, sent her husband a letter. She urged him to “remember the ladies.” She further wrote, “All men would be tyrants if they could….

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