Category

Commentaries/Opinions

Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

African Americans Lose, While Others Gain

By Commentaries/Opinions, Dr. Julianne Malveaux

The unemployment rate is falling for the third month in a row, and in December about 200,000 private sector jobs were created. The monthly unemployment report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicated that unemployment has declined by six tenths of a percentage point since August. Already, some economists are saying we can expect another decline next month. I am surprised, however, at the very tepid language that the Employment…

Read More
Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Are Fredom Riders Seeds Bearing Fruit?

By Commentaries/Opinions, Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Are Fredom Riders Seeds Bearing Fruit? By Julianne Malveaux Fifty years ago this month, the Freedom Rides began.   While the Supreme Court ruled that segregation in interstate commerce, including bus terminals, was illegal, the laws were not being enforced. Because the law failed to act, people of conscience, courage and determination acted instead.    Resistance to […]

Read More
Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Debilitating Poverty Is Corrosive

By Commentaries/Opinions, Dr. Julianne Malveaux

DEBILITATING POVERTY IS CORROSIVE BY JULIANNE MALVEAUX The fall of the Roman Empire is best captured in the phrase that “Nero fiddled while Rome burned”.  Set on pursuing his own pleasures and indulgences, Nero could not see the walls crumbling around him. Similarly, our leaders seem oblivious to the walls crashing in on us, bickering about the way […]

Read More
Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Ron Daniels

The Emancipation Proclamation: From 3/5 Human to Second Class Citizenship

By Commentaries/Opinions, Vantage Point Articles

When I first became active in the Civil Rights Movement as a teenager in Youngstown, Ohio, January 1st was always a very important day in the Black community — not because it was the first day of a new year, but it was Emancipation Day. Every year the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance and the local Chapter of the NAACP would host a major program commemorating the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863.  This was celebrated as a momentous occasion because with a stroke of a pen, President Lincoln freed enslaved Africans from bondage.  Certainly a just cause for celebration! What was never noted in the Emancipation Day Programs was that the Proclamation did not “free” all of the 4 million enslaved Africans.

Read More