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Book Review Archives - Page 3 of 5 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Empire Windrush migrants arrive at Tilbury in 1948.

‘There were Africans in Britain before the English came here’

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

How Staying Power shook British history. When it was published in 1984 Staying Power vividly captured the struggle for black British identity. Nearly 35 years on it still has lessons to teach. By Gary Younge, The Guardian — “The very serious function of racism is distraction,” Toni Morrison argued in a lecture in Portland, Oregon, in 1975: It keeps you from doing your work. It keeps you explaining, over and…

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Frederick Douglass

David Blight on Frederick Douglass: ‘I call him beautifully human’

By Commentaries/Opinions

‘At first I didn’t want to,’ says the author of this magisterial biography of the great abolitionist, ‘it was so daunting’ By Martin Pengelly, The Guardian — David Blight arrives in New York pulling his carry-on luggage, en route from Washington, soon to fly onwards to San Francisco. Such is the interest in his new biography of Frederick Douglass, a book 10 years in the writing and a whole career…

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The crowd at a get-out-the-vote rally during a speech by Michelle Obama, Miami, Florida, September 2018

Fighting to Vote

By Editors' Choice

By Michael Tomasky, The New York Review — The Embattled Vote in America: From the Founding to the Present by Allan J. Lichtman Harvard University Press, 315 pp., $27.95 If you grew up, as I did, in the 1960s and 1970s, watching (albeit through a child’s eyes) the civil rights movement notch victory after victory, you could be forgiven for thinking at the time that that happy condition was normal.…

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Denmark Vesey House at 56 Bull Street in Charleston, South Carolina.

Slavery and Memory in Charleston, South Carolina

By Reparations

By Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders, AAIHS — The familiar refrain after the Emmanuel AME massacre on June 17, 2015, was that Dylann Roof, the murderer, was not from “here.” But as Ethan Kytle and Blain Roberts’ Denmark Vesey’s Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy aptly demonstrates, Roof’s understanding of history and memory in Charleston led him to that church; and his understanding was not alien to the sometimes violently, oft-contested memory of slavery in the…

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Donald Trump acknowledges the crowd after an address to the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Kansas City, Missouri.

How Fascism Works review: a vital read for a nation under Trump

By Commentaries/Opinions

Yale professor Jason Stanley enters a growing literary field with a sober examination of an inflammatory political concept. By Tom McCarthy, The Guardian — One of the insidious ironies of fascist politics, the philosopher Jason Stanley writes in his arresting new book, is that talk of fascism itself becomes more difficult because it is made to seem outlandish. The normalization of the fascist myth “makes us able to tolerate what was once…

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America Is on the Road to Becoming a Fascist State

By Editors' Choice

Trump and his ilk are channeling a noxious strain of patriotism that creates a nostalgia for a past that never existed. By Robert Scheer, Alternet / Truthdig — In a compelling essay for The New York Review of Books this month, Christopher R. Browning, a leading historian of the Holocaust and Nazism, outlines the frightening parallels between the United States and the Weimar Republic. “No matter how and when the Trump presidency ends,”…

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Barack Obama: American Historian

Barack Obama: American Historian

By Editors' Choice

By Steven Sarson, History News Networks — The release of Dinesh D’Souza’s documentary “Death of a Nation” is the latest iteration of an alt.right mission to reinforce its recent rise to power by popularizing particular and deeply politicized visions of the American past. The most obvious evidence of political bias is D’Souza’s counter-factual insistence that the Democratic Party hasn’t changed since its proslavery antebellum days, and, in a contradiction that only the…

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The first of the century, the extensive history provides an in-depth look at the voices and bodies that shaped the century.

Author Releases Century’s ‘Most Extensive Pan-African History’

By Reparations

“African history is considered rather unimportant, but the history of the African diaspora isn’t considered at all,” Hakim Adi said. By teleSur — “Pan-Africanism: A History” a recently released book written by Professor Hakim Adi is seeking to explore and create discussion about Pan-Africanism around the world, a topic the author says often goes undiscussed. From the early 1900’s til now, in his new book “Pan-Africanism: A History” Professor Hakim Adi explores…

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Mary Frances Berry

Q&A with Mary Frances Berry

By Commentaries/Opinions

The civil rights activist, historian, and author discusses her new book “History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times.”   Civil rights activist, historian, and author Mary Frances Berry insists that “each generation has a responsibility to make a dent in the wall of injustice.” Berry, the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and a professor of history and Africana studies in the School of Arts and Sciences, has tackled…

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Dr Martin Luther King Jr

The Young MLK Already Had Socialist Ideas

By Editors' Choice

A new book argues that King’s suspicion of American capitalism and his passion for economic justice did not represent a turn in his last tumultuous years. They were there all along. By Lynn Parramore, Institute for New Economic Thinking — The Millennial socialists are coming,” declared a June 30 New York Times headline, describing a surprise surge of young female candidates endorsed by the Democratic Socialists of America who beat their establishment opponents…

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