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Fannie Lou Hamer Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Fannie Lou Hamer

Homage to Fannie Lou Hamer: Womanist, Warrior and Way-Opener

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

Dr. Maulana Karenga — This is a profoundly respectful re-remembering and raising up, an offering of word and water in tambiko, sacred offering to a most honored ancestor. Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer (October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977) is one of those awesome ancestors about whom it is said: They were so tall when they stood up, they were the height of mountains and when they lay down, they…

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Fannie Lou Hamer

Fannie Lou Hamer Died of Untreated Breast Cancer

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and the proliferation of pink ribbons is about to start.  Predatory capitalists will make breast cancer their cause, producing pink t-shirts, pocketbooks, everything. It’s a mixed blessing, this awareness, because too many will make this both a marketing and a profit-making opportunity, while others will wonder how they can use their health insurance to afford a mammogram.  Health equity is…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Remembering the Watts Revolt: A Shared Condition, Consciousness and Commitment

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — The Anniversary of the 1965 Watts Revolt occurs in the context of a larger history of Black struggle, sacrifices and achievements: the assassination, sacrifice and martyrdom of Min. Malcolm X; the Selma March; the Voting Rights Act; the founding of our organization Us and the African American Cultural Center; and the introduction of the Black value system, the Nguzo Saba, which became the core values of…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Houston, We Have A Problem: America, Spacetripping With Trump

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — This is not a drill. “Houston, we have a problem,” or more historically and currently correct, “Houston, we’ve had a problem, here.” It’s not a problem of a ship in space, but rather the ship of state, setting aside its best-documents claims and making a hard right turn towards its worst-practices. And both the captain and crew are unrepentantly and defiantly doing and saying immoral,…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Beyond the Bondage of Plantation Politics: Crafting Our Own Presidential Platform — Part 1

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

Part. 1. By Dr. Maulana Karenga — During both the Holocaust of enslavement and the era of segregation, leaving the plantation was a metaphor, mental process and actual practice of freedom. It was a freeing oneself mentally and physically, thinking freedom and then acting in ways that led to its achievement as did Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Fannie Lou Hamer, Messenger Muhammad and countless others in their rejection of and resistance to…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Beyond the Bondage of Plantation Politics: Crafting Our Own Presidential Platform — Part 2

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

Part. 2. By Dr. Maulana Karenga — The insistence on calling our righteous and relentless struggle by its rightful name, The Black Freedom Movement, instead of the Civil Rights Movement, is no minor matter.  For it speaks to our commitment to freedom itself and reflects in a real way how we understand ourselves and our initiative and history in the world. Indeed, it reveals our resistance to plantation politics that…

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Diane Nash, right, represented the Southern Christian Leadership Conference at the White House in 1963.

The Selfless Servant Leadership of the African-American Women of the Civil-Rights Movement

By Editors' Choice

These women didn’t stand on ceremony; they accepted the risks of activism and fought for worlds where others might have freedoms that they themselves would never enjoy. By Janet Dewart Bell — During the civil-rights movement, African Americans led the fight to free this country from the vestiges of slavery and Jim Crow. Though they all too often were—and remain—invisible to the public, African-American women played significant roles at all…

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Amy Jacques Garvey with her husband, Marcus.

The Hidden History Of Black Nationalist Women’s Political Activism

By Editors' Choice

By Keisha N. Blain, the Conversation — Black History Month is an opportunity to reflect on the historical contributions of black people in the United States. Too often, however, this history focuses on black men, sidelining black women and diminishing their contributions. This is true in mainstream narratives of black nationalist movements in the United States. These narratives almost always highlight the experiences of a handful of black nationalist men, including…

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