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Martin Luther King Archives - Page 6 of 7 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

"50 years after Martin Luther King, Jr. was killed, the same racial injustices still confront the nation."

Radical New Leaders Are Reviving Martin Luther King’s Poor People’s Campaign

By Commentaries/Opinions

The movement looks to rebuild the cross-racial civil rights alliance that disintegrated during a half-century of counter-revolution. Their radical vision is more necessary than ever. By Lewis M. Steel — The critical question long-time veterans of the civil rights movement and new activists alike ask is this: Are the times ripe for a newly energized movement to break the stagnation which has shut down most racial progress for the last…

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An activist holds a Pan-African flag during a protest disrupting the Association of Chiefs of Police Conference on October 25, 2015, in Chicago, Illinois.

To Honor King, Let’s Work to End Racial Capitalism

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Barbara Ransby and Aislinn Pulley — April 4 marked the historic 50th anniversary since Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. At this time, it is vital to highlight the fact that King understood the depth of state violence, noting the violent effects of government policy in many spheres. As King said a year before his death, “I could never again raise my voice against the violence of the…

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Segregation in America

Segregation in America

By News & Current Affairs

Where a divided nation stands, half a century after Martin Luther King’s death By The Data Team, economist.com — FIFTY years ago, when Martin Luther King was assassinated, America was a nation on the edge. The ensuing riots in more than 100 cities seemed to threaten the entire project of civil rights. Despite the landmark legislation passed in the 1960s, including the Civil Rights Act, Voting Rights Act and Fair Housing…

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Trump, Martin Luther King Jr

What if Martin Luther King Jr. had Lived?

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson — There is a huge literary growth industry in counter-factual history. Or, to put it more simply, “what if” history. Now the what if question fifty years after the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is: “What if he had lived?” This is not merely an exercise in fun, what if speculation. The question provokes much thought about what America and the world might have…

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King addresses Alabamians in 1965 at the First Baptist Church in Eutaw

Martin Luther King Jr.’s Call For a Poor People’s Campaign

By Commentaries/Opinions

In early 1968, the activist planned a massive protest in the nation’s capital. In the early months of 1968, King toured the South and beyond to drum up interest in, and raise funds for, the Poor People’s Campaign, which he had initiated and was supposed to lead later that spring. On March 20, he addressed a rally in the small, majority-black town of Eutaw, in western Alabama. He called for…

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Martin Luther King’s Last Speech: I’ve Been to the Mountaintop

By Video/Audio

“I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” is the last speech delivered by Martin Luther King Jr. King spoke on April 3, 1968, at the Mason Temple (Church of God in Christ Headquarters) in Memphis, Tennessee. On the following day, King was assassinated. The speech primarily concerns the Memphis Sanitation Strike. King calls for unity, economic actions, boycotts, and nonviolent protest, while challenging the United States to live up to its ideals….

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Dr Martin Luther King Jr speaking at a rally in Memphis, the city where he was killed. Memphis will also be the epicenter of events next week.

Martin Luther King: 50th anniversary of death will see events across nation

By News & Current Affairs

Commemorations are planned across the US for Wednesday to honor the civil rights leader on the date of his assassination. Much of the United States will come to a halt next Wednesday to mark the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr’s assassination. Memphis, Tennessee, where Dr King was shot dead on 4 April 1968, will be the epicenter as all across the US commemorations are scheduled to honor the…

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How much has really improved for black people in the U.S. since 1968

Black Americans mostly left behind by progress since Dr. King’s death

By Commentaries/Opinions

How much has really improved for black people in the U.S. since 1968? By Sharon Austin — On Apr. 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee, while assisting striking sanitation workers. That was almost 50 years ago. Back then, the wholesale racial integration required by the 1964 Civil Rights Act was just beginning to chip away at discrimination in education, jobs and public facilities. Black voters had only obtained legal protections two years earlier, and the 1968 Fair Housing Act was about to become law. African-Americans were only beginning to move into neighborhoods, colleges and careers once reserved for whites only.

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