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Black History Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Lavinia Baker and her five surviving children after the lynching of her husband and baby on Feb. 22, 1898.

Post office to be named for black postmaster who was lynched in 1898

By | News & Current Affairs

Frazier B. Baker was the first black postmaster in Lake City, South Carolina. By Associated Press — LAKE CITY, S.C. — A South Carolina town’s post office will be named in honor of its first black postmaster, Frazier B. Baker, who was lynched in 1898 after he refused to resign. U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., introduced a bill to rename the office after Baker, saying it would ensure that his…

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Left: Joe Stewart and Patricia Bayonne-Johnson, both descendants of people sold as slaves by Georgetown University, arrive to hear about moves aimed at acknowledging and encouraging dialogue about the Jesuit-run university's ties to slavery in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 1, 2016

UN panel says the U.S. owes reparations to African-Americans

By | Reparations

By Eugene Mason, PBS — The United States owes African-Americans reparations for slavery, a recent report by a United Nations-affiliated group said. The UN Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent said that compensation is necessary to combat the disadvantages caused by 245 years of legally allowing the sale of people based on the color of their skin. The U.N. group warned that the U.S. has not confronted its legacy of “racial terrorism.”…

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When Mandela's Predecessor Toured the Us to Expose Segregation Back Home

When Mandela’s Predecessor Toured the Us to Expose Segregation Back Home

By | Editors' Choice

Solomon Plaatje, an early ANC leader, came to America in 1921 to expose the growing number of race laws back home. By Matthew Blackman, OZY — A short, well-dressed 44-year-old man of the southern African Barolong tribe stood at the American border near Niagara Falls holding Canadian passport No. 79551. It stated the bearer was a British national and a resident of Toronto. In fact, he was Solomon Plaatje, the…

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Empire Windrush migrants arrive at Tilbury in 1948.

‘There were Africans in Britain before the English came here’

By | Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

How Staying Power shook British history. When it was published in 1984 Staying Power vividly captured the struggle for black British identity. Nearly 35 years on it still has lessons to teach. By Gary Younge, The Guardian — “The very serious function of racism is distraction,” Toni Morrison argued in a lecture in Portland, Oregon, in 1975: It keeps you from doing your work. It keeps you explaining, over and…

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A new statue (2015) of Frederick Douglass stands in Hornbake Plaza.

Frederick Douglass and Irish Home Rule

By | Reparations

Image: A new statue (2015) of Frederick Douglass stands in Hornbake Plaza. Note: While most of us generally think about the profound activism and wisdom of Frederick Douglass being acknowledged primarily in the United States, his work and reputation was, in fact, international, as noted below regarding his visits to Ireland. In addition, another aspect of the movement for justice and the abolition of slavery was the British/Irish international support…

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SNCC protesters march in Montgomery, 1965

Documenting and Digitizing Democracy: The SNCC Digital Gateway

By | Editors' Choice

By Ashley Farmer, Black Perspectives — “Learn from the Past, Organize the Future, Make Democracy Work.” This is the mission statement that greets visitors at the SNCC Digital Gateway—a wide-ranging, collaborative website that documents and animates the history of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Founded in April 1960 under the guidance of veteran activist Ella Baker, SNCC became a leading civil rights organization due to countless young organizers who engaged in voter…

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RiseUp Detroit (Teaser) – The Revolutionary evolution of Black Detroit during the 60’s

By | News & Current Affairs, Video/Audio

RiseUp Detroit chronicles the Revolutionary evolution of Black Detroit during the 60’s. Featuring activists JoAnn Watson, Frank Joyce, Helen Moore, Rev. Dan Aldridge, Elliot Hall, Esq., Charles E. Ferrell and others. Produced by Junius Williams, for the Center for Education and Juvenile Justice. In partnership with Wayne State University, Rutgers University (Newark), Washington University (St. Louis). Research by Peter Blackmer. Video and Editing by 248 Pencils.

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Imperial Federation Map of the World showing the extent of the British Empire. The Empire in red in 1886, by Walter Crane

British Empire is still being whitewashed by the school curriculum – historian on why this must change

By | Editors' Choice

By Deana Heath, The Conversation — Jeremy Corbyn has recently proposed that British school children should be taught about the history of the realities of British imperialism and colonialism. This would include the history of people of colour as components of, and contributors to, the British nation-state – rather than simply as enslaved victims of it. As Corbyn rightly noted: “Black history is British history” – and hence its study should be…

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