Tag

Civil Rights Movement Archives - Page 2 of 5 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Rev. Joseph Lowery with Rosa Parks

Undaunted Resistance: Joseph Lowery and the Spirit of SCLC

By Editors' Choice

By R. Drew Smith, AAIHS — Against all odds, a movement for racial justice took hold in mid-20th-century America, emerging from within the racially-heated South, and drawing sustenance from a rich-array of Black religious sources. A cadre of activist Black clergypersons were among the central figures in this historic social movement, with organizations such as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) epitomizing the promise of a socially-mobilized Black clergy sector. Although SCLC…

Read More
John Marshall High School, in Milwaukee, on election day.

Selma 1965, Wisconsin 2020: Multiracial Democracy vs. A White Republic

By Editors' Choice

By Max Elbaum, Organizing Upgrade — I have never been prouder of the people of my home state than over the last twelve days. I went to John Marshall High School in Milwaukee, class of 1964. It was after coming home from school one day that I watched on television as non-violent Civil Rights protesters were attacked with dogs and fire hoses in Birmingham, Alabama. A few weeks after I…

Read More

The SDPC Mourns the Loss of a Great Leader

By Editors' Choice

Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, October 6, 1921 – March 27, 2020. Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference, Inc. General Secretary, the Rev. Dr. Iva Carruthers, the Board of Trustees and the entire SDPC network of congregations across the nation mourn the loss of the Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, a soldier for justice, human and civil rights. Rev. Lowery, who received Samuel DeWitt Proctor’s “Beautiful Are Their Feet” award in 2015, transitioned from…

Read More
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., left, meets with the Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, center, and the Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker at First African Baptist Church in Richmond, Va., for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference convention on Sept. 25, 1963.

Remembering the “Dean of the Civil Rights Movement”

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Ellen McGirt — All movements have moments. When it comes to voting rights, Reverend Joseph Echols Lowery was there for most of them. The man who was known as the “Dean of the Civil Rights Movement” died peacefully at home last Friday. He was 98. Lowery was a co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with the Rev. Martin Luther King, and a co-creator of the bus boycott that…

Read More
Black Power Movement / Civil Rights Movement

How the Black Power Movement Influenced the Civil Rights Movement

By Editors' Choice

With a focus on racial pride and self-determination, the Black Power movement argued that civil rights reforms did not go far enough to end discrimination against African Americans. By Sarah Pruitt, History — By 1966, the civil rights movement had been gaining momentum for more than a decade, as thousands of African Americans embraced a strategy of nonviolent protest against racial segregation and demanded equal rights under the law. But for an…

Read More
Andrew "Rube" Foster and Negro League Baseball

The Rightness of Negro League Player reparations

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Ernest DiStefano — Ernest DiStefano has written a stirring appeal for reparations for Negro League ballplayers and their descendants. This appeal in the form of a letter to Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred published in The Stansbury Forum. The letter arrived on the Commissioner’s desk on January 22 in the midst of the video sign stealing crisis. Hopefully, but certainly not without public pressure, Manfred will feel compelled…

Read More
William Monroe Trotter.

The Legacy of a Radical Black Newspaperman

By Editors' Choice

William Monroe Trotter rejected the view that racial equality could come in stages. By Casey Cep, The New Yorker — The mustache had to go. A classic nineteenth-century handlebar, it was far too recognizable, so William Monroe Trotter shaved it off. In addition to the disguise, he arranged to take a cooking class in his boarding house, evincing a sudden interest that would have surprised his wife, mother, and two…

Read More
Terri L. Crawford with Senator Nina Turner

Protecting Democracy – An Interview with Sen. Nina Turner

By Editors' Choice

By Terri L. Crawford, JD, The Omaha Star — “Moreover, he shall speak for you to the people; and he will be as a mouth for you …” — Exodus 4:16 As the voice of the people, the Nebraska Democratic Party Black Caucus’ mission is to promote the involvement of Blacks in the political process and the activities of the party at the local, state, and national level. The Caucus…

Read More

The Massacre That Spawned the Alt-Right

By Editors' Choice

Forty years ago, a gang of Klansmen and Nazis murdered five communists in broad daylight. America has never been the same. By Shaun Assael and Peter Keating, Politico — “Death to the Klan!” On Saturday, November 3, 1979, that chant swept over Morningside Homes, a mostly black housing project in Greensboro, North Carolina, as dozens of protesters—some donning blue hard hats for protection—hammered placards onto signposts and danced in the…

Read More
Jack O'Dell

Jack O’Dell – An Appreciation

By News & Current Affairs

The life and work of Jack O’Dell who died last week at 96 at his home in Vancouver, British Columbia were marked by an unwavering radical vision fused with an immovable partisanship for working people the world over. By James Campbell and Mark Solomon, Portside — Jack’s quietly effective teaching, his strategic acumen, his theoretical insight, his unbending internationalism and his generosity of intellect and spirit inspired and enriched the…

Read More