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native americans Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Native Americans

Where Did We Come From? And who was there in the first place?

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Heather Gray, Justice Initiative — Preface This will be the beginning of a series about where we came from and/or who was there already. Trump repeatedly says “Go back to where you came from.” So, I have questioned what on earth does he mean by that. All of us homo sapiens in the world came from Africa. But, also, as I started thinking about where I was born and where I…

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The statue depicts Roosevelt on horseback, with a Native American man and an African man

How Do We Address a Statue of President Roosevelt That Affirms Racist Hierarchies?

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Nick Mirzoeff, Hyperallergic — Almost two years after the 2017 fascist rally at Charlottesville around a mediocre statue of Robert E. Lee, the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) opened its exhibition Addressing the Statue for an unspecified run. The statue in question is James Earle Fraser’s massive “Theodore Roosevelt Equestrian Memorial,” situated outside the Museum’s main entrance, depicting Roosevelt flanked by his gun carriers, a stereotyped Plains Indian and a generic African. It…

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Underground Railroad

The Native Americans Who Assisted the Underground Railroad

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Roy E. Finkenbine — In an interview conducted in 2002, the late Helen Hornbeck Tanner, an influential historian of the Native American experience in the Midwest best known for her magisterial Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History (1987), reflected on the considerable record of “coexistence and cooperation” between African Americans and Indians in the region. According to Tanner, “[an] important example of African and Indian cooperation was the Indian-operated Underground Railroad….

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9/23/19 — Host Dr. Ron Daniels talks with special guests Marilyn Vann, Heather L. Hodges and callers. Topics: Cherokee Nation Demands Seat in Congress and Crisis of Black Land Loss in Gullah Country.

Vantage Point Radio: Cherokee Nation Demands Seat in Congress, Black Land Loss in Gullah Country

By Vantage Point Radio

Vantage Point Radio September 23, 2019 with host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor. Topics: Cherokee Nation Demands Seat in Congress Crisis of Black Land Loss in Gullah Country. Guests: Marilyn Vann, President Descendant of Freedmen’s Association, Oklahoma City, OK and Heather L. Hodges, Executive Director, Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission, Johns Island, SC Commentary. And commentary on Reparatory Justice by Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor

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The People’s Organization for Progress

The Peoples’ Organization for Progress (POP) Statement on African-American Freedom Fighters and the Palestinian Struggle

By Commentaries/Opinions

By The People’s Organization for Progress (POP) — This is a brief summary and overview that presents many of the voices in the lengthy history of African-American support and solidarity for the Palestinian People’s legitimate claim for justice and selfdetermination. This support has grown and developed from a perspective advocated by some of the most radical and progressive activists such as Malcolm X and the Black Panther Party to a…

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Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence Is Sexist, Racist, Prejudiced

By Commentaries/Opinions

We can embrace the underlying spirit of the Declaration of Independence but also learn from its shortcomings. By Matthew Rozsa, Salon — It is painful to write about the shortcomings of the Declaration of Independence. The historic document was officially approved by the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776 — a mere two days after the Lee Resolution formally declared the American colonies to be independent of the…

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Gayle King interviews Ralph Northam

Slavery vs Indentured Servitude: Which aids racism?

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

Perhaps the main reason so many people objected to Virginia Governor Ralph Northam calling the first 20 Africans to land in Virginia in 1619 indentured servants, and not slaves, is that they believe the conditions of slavery were so much harsher than those of indentured servitude, that calling these Africans indentured servants amounts to a cover-up of their reality. That is because the popular image that we have been sold…

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The Landing of William Penn. United States Library of Congress

The Accidents of History That Shaped Global Migration

By Editors' Choice

The flap of a butterfly’s wings really can cause a hurricane. By James Watkins, OZY — The very first immigrant from Thailand to Iceland arrived in 1979. Not a huge amount is known about who the person was — despite fastidious Nordic statisticians — but it appears to have been a woman. She and a handful of other Thais, who made the trip over in the 1980s, were mostly women who had…

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Five nations in the Indian Territory - the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole - kept back slaves for decades

How Native Americans adopted slavery from white settlers

By Reparations

And how black people in Indian Territory were denied their rights even after their emancipation. By Alaina E Roberts, Al Jazeera — Last week marked the 153rd anniversary of the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the US Constitution in 1865. Rightly celebrated as a milestone for the black American community, the 13th Amendment led to the eventual liberation of all African Americans enslaved in the United States of the late…

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J.C.H. Grabill/Library of Congress The caption says: Famous Battery “E” of 1st Artillery. These brave men and the Hotchkiss gun that Big Foot’s Indians thought were toys, together with the fighting 7th what’s left of Gen. Custer’s boys, sent 200 Indians to that Heaven which the ghost dancer enjoys. This checked the Indian noise and Gen. Miles with staff returned to Illinois.

What White Supremacists Know

By Commentaries/Opinions, Editors' Choice

The violent theft of land and capital is at the core of the U.S. experiment: the U.S. military got its start in the wars against Native Americans. By Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Boston Review — The United States has been at war every day since its founding, often covertly and often in several parts of the world at once. As ghastly as that sentence is, it still does not capture the full…

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