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native americans Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Fatima Garcia of the group Danza Azteca Guadalupana dances during an event celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Austin, Texas, on Saturday.

Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Explained

By Editors' Choice

Many cities and states are observing the day. Here’s some of the history behind it. By Melina Delkic, NYT — President Biden has proclaimed Monday, Oct. 11, as Indigenous Peoples’ Day, becoming the first U.S. president to formally recognize the day. “For generations, Federal policies systematically sought to assimilate and displace Native people and eradicate Native cultures,” Mr. Biden wrote in the proclamation issued on Friday. “Today, we recognize Indigenous peoples’…

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Joe Biden

A Proclamation on Indigenous Peoples’ Day, 2021

By News & Current Affairs

By President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — Since time immemorial, American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians have built vibrant and diverse cultures — safeguarding land, language, spirit, knowledge, and tradition across the generations. On Indigenous Peoples’ Day, our Nation celebrates the invaluable contributions and resilience of Indigenous peoples, recognizes their inherent sovereignty, and commits to honoring the Federal Government’s trust and treaty obligations to Tribal Nations. Our country was…

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Protesters marched in an Indigenous Peoples Day rally in Boston on Oct. 10, 2020, as part of a demonstration to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples' Day. Boston made that change last week.

Goodbye, Columbus? Here’s what Indigenous Peoples’ Day means to Native Americans

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Emma Bowman, NPR — This year marks the first time a U.S. president has officially recognized Indigenous Peoples’ Day. President Biden issued a proclamation on Friday to observe this Oct. 11 as a day to honor Native Americans, their resilience and their contributions to American society throughout history, even as they faced assimilation, discrimination and genocide spanning generations. The move shifts focus from Columbus Day, the federal holiday celebrating Christopher Columbus,…

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American Indian Movement (AIM) took down a statue of Columbus near the Minnesota State Capitol in St. Paul

The forgotten history of solidarity between Black and Indigenous freedom movements

By Editors' Choice

By Kyle T. Mays, HNN — Since the emergence of Black Lives Matter in 2013, the Standing Rock Sioux-led global protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline, and more recently, the murders of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, Black and Indigenous co-resistance has once again come to the forefront of our national consciousness. Instead of calls to “police the police” or for “community control” of police from the 1960s, activists have…

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An enslaved African American family or families pose on the plantation of Dr. William F. Gaines in Hanover County, Virginia, 1862.

The Thorny History of Reparations in the United States

By Reparations

In the 20th century, the country issued reparations for Japanese American internment, Native land seizures, massacres and police brutality. Will slavery be next? By Erin Blakemore, History — The papers were handed out one by one to the elderly recipients—most frail, some in wheelchairs. To some, it may have looked like a run-of-the-mill governmental ceremony with the usual federal fanfare. But to Norman Mineta, a California congressman and future Secretary…

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Sugar Slavery

Measure creating reparations committee advances at Illinois statehouse

By Reparations

By Greg Bishop— A measure advancing at the Illinois statehouse could create a commission to investigate reparations for communities impacted by slavery. House Bill 5024 sponsor state Rep. Will Davis, D-Hazel Crest, advanced his measure out of the House State Government Committee Saturday. The bill would create a committee to look at the broader issue of reparations for the Black community, “versus writing a bill that would say this specifically is…

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Minnesota churches launch 10-year plan for racial healing, reparations

By Reparations

The Minnesota Council of Churches, leveraging its 25 denominations with more than 1 million members, prioritizes path to “truth and reparation.” By Jean Hopfensperger— A St. Louis Park congregation devoted two years to exploring white supremacy, and now it is raising $1 million for a child care center for low-income families. In Bemidji, some faith leaders are participating in “listening posts” often led by Native Americans who share experiences of…

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Thanksgiving is time for reparations

By Reparations

By Winona LaDuke— It’s Thanksgiving morning everywhere in America. Thanksgiving needs to mean something to Native people, preferably in the form of justice and reparations. Not a “thanks for taking” sort of commemoration. Maybe it’s even time for a reconciliation with Mother Earth. Here are some ideas. Consider the first thanksgiving with the Wampanoags, Pequots and the Pilgrims. After dining, there were beheadings of Native leaders and their heads were displayed on…

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Vantage Point: Black Native American Freedmen Demand Justice

By News & Current Affairs, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Vantage Point September 14, 2020 — On this special edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with guests Ronald Graham and Marilyn Vann. Topic Black Native American Freedmen Demand Justice Guests Ronald Graham, President, Muscogee Creek Freedmen Band, Oklahoma City, OK Marilyn Vann, President, Descendants of Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes, Oklahoma City, OK Ways to listen Live (Radio) — Mondays 3-4PM on WBAI,…

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A print of U.S. President Andrew Jackson at the Battle of Tallushatchee, 1813.

This Land Is Not Your Land

By Editors' Choice

The Ethnic Cleansing of Native Americans By David Treuer — In his first annual message to the U.S. Congress, in 1829, U.S. President Andrew Jackson—a slave-owning real estate speculator already famous for burning down Creek settlements and hounding the survivors of the Creek War of 1813–14—called for the “voluntary” migration of Native Americans to lands west of the Mississippi River. Six months later, in the spring of 1830, he signed…

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Armed protesters provide security as demonstrators take part in an "American Patriot Rally," on the steps of the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, on April 30, 2020

For many cautious African Americans, the move to reopen America is not a ‘black friendly’ campaign

By COVID-19 (Coronavirus), News & Current Affairs

“Nothing about this movement is really black friendly.” By Nick Charles, NBC News — As protests erupt over stay-at-home orders and the clamor to reopen the economy becomes louder, the coalition of people storming state Capitols — some armed with semi-automatic weapons and most not wearing masks or observing social distancing guidelines — have had one thing in common: Almost all of them are white. African Americans, for the most…

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Former enslaved people in a Southern town shortly after the end of the Civil War, circa 1865.

American Slavery and ‘the Relentless Unforeseen’

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

This essay is an adaptation of the fourth annual Philip Roth Lecture, delivered at the Newark Public Library on November 4, 2019. The lecture began with an appreciation of Roth’s merging of fiction and history. An admirer of great historical writing, Roth understood that, to be truly great, it had to grapple with what he called, in The Plot Against America, “the relentless unfolding of the unforeseen.” Flipped on its…

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