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Afro-Latinx

From Left to Right: Photo by Jessica Simmonds; Photo Courtesy of Dash Harris Machado; Javier Wallace by Sarmia Osbourne

For Some Black People, The Term ‘Latinx’ Is Another Form of Erasure

By Commentaries/Opinions

Black diasporans discuss the ways the label can be overly broad—and leave out an important part of their identities. By Janel Martinez, Vice — For many Black people, their identification with Latinx identity is complicated—the term, meant to be all-inclusive, has the exact opposite effect. Though Black and Indigenous Latin Americans have contributed significantly to Latinx culture (think musical genres like rumba, tango, and reggaetón, to name a few, or the masterful creations…

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Armed protesters provide security as demonstrators take part in an "American Patriot Rally," on the steps of the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, on April 30, 2020

For many cautious African Americans, the move to reopen America is not a ‘black friendly’ campaign

By COVID-19 (Coronavirus), News & Current Affairs

“Nothing about this movement is really black friendly.” By Nick Charles, NBC News — As protests erupt over stay-at-home orders and the clamor to reopen the economy becomes louder, the coalition of people storming state Capitols — some armed with semi-automatic weapons and most not wearing masks or observing social distancing guidelines — have had one thing in common: Almost all of them are white. African Americans, for the most…

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Modesta Irizarry, a community leader, in Loíza, Puerto Rico

In the Afro-Caribbean heart of Puerto Rico, locals fight erosion, government indifference

By News & Current Affairs

Loíza, Puerto Rico, is filled with palm trees, unassuming bars, bomba music, beautiful beaches — and strong-willed locals who refuse to be forgotten. LOÍZA, Puerto Rico — The waves crashed loudly on the collapsed ruins of the Paseo del Atlántico, a walkway that once partially protected residents here from the volatile ocean. Erosion along this northernmost coast of Puerto Rico, nearly 20 miles east of San Juan, precipitated the promenade’s destruction…

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Understanding ADOS: The Movement to Hijack Black Identity and Weaken Black Unity. By Jessica Ann Mitchell Aiwuyor.

Understanding ADOS: The Movement to Hijack Black Identity and Weaken Black Unity

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

By Jessica Ann Mitchell Aiwuyor — The term “American Descendants of Slavery” (ADOS) was created in 2016 to describe and distinctly separate Black Americans/African Americans from Black immigrant communities (Africans, Afro-Caribbeans, Afro-Latinos, etc). The movement claims to advocate for reparations on behalf of Black Americans. However, this movement’s leadership is linked to right-wing media and white supremacists that have a history of attempting to cause divisions in the Black community.

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