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Emancipation Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Amandla Baraka: We Keep Us Safe, June 2020

‘We Must Act Out Our Freedom’

By Editors' Choice

By Darryl Pinckney, NYREV — I will look for you in the stories of new kings. Juneteenth isn’t mentioned in the writings of W.E.B. Du Bois or Carter Woodson, the founder of The Journal of Negro History. I haven’t yet come across a description of the first Juneteenth celebrations equivalent to Colonel Thomas Wentworth Higginson’s report of the ceremonies for the Emancipation Proclamation as it was read aloud on Port Royal…

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Dr. The Honourable Ralph E. Gonsalves Prime Minister of St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Chairman of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM)

Message From CARICOM Chairman on the 186th Anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery

By Reparations

The 186th Anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery in the CARICOM Member-countries Which Were Colonised by Britain. By Dr. The Honourable Ralph E. Gonsalves Prime Minister of St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Chairman of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) On August 1, 2020, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) commemorates the 186th anniversary of the abolition of the enslavement of Africans in the CARICOM member-countries which were colonized by Britain. In 1833,…

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Suriname Emancipation

July 1, 1863: The day of great deception in Suriname

By Reparations

For many years Surinamese people of African descent, whose ancestors worked on the plantations in the colony of Suriname, celebrated and commemorated ‘Keti Koti’ on July 1 as “Emancipation Day”. In recent years they have been doing this more and more together with others from our Republic. Many have never considered why ‘Keti Koti’ is always celebrated and/or commemorated on July 1. Also, many have never considered why the ‘Keti…

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Smoke rises from damaged properties after the Tulsa Race Massacre in Tulsa, Oklahoma June 1921.

From grandfather to grandson, the lessons of the Tulsa race massacre

By Editors' Choice

By Gregory B. Fairchild — My family sat down to watch the first episode of HBO’s “Watchmen” last October. Stephen Williams, the director, included quick cuts of gunshots, explosions, citizens fleeing roaming mobs, and even a plane dropping bombs. We’ve come to anticipate these elements in superhero films. As the sepia-toned footage spooled across the screen, the words “Tulsa 1921” were superimposed over the mayhem. My throat tightened. I knew…

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UWI’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Sir Hilary Beckles

Journey to Juneteenth: Caribbean Solidarity

By News & Current Affairs

By Professor Sir Hilary Beckles, CARICOM Reparations Commission — As you, our African American compatriots, rise to recognize and celebrate the legal ending of the chattel bondage of our ancestors, we, your brothers and sisters from ‘your islands’ downstream Mississippi are standing with you in joyous remembrance of the journey. We have always recognized our unity as one people with a common history, legacy and cause. We fought against our…

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Chi Oriji leads a group in dance during the Juneteenth MusicFest and Parade, recognizing the end of slavery in America in Philadelphia on June 23, 2018.

Activists Are Pushing to Make Juneteenth a National Holiday

By News & Current Affairs

Here’s the History Behind Their Fight. By Olivia B. Waxman, Times — When President Donald Trump announced last week that he would hold a campaign rally in Tulsa on June 19, the backlash was swift. The speech was to take place near the site of a 1921 race massacre, and June 19 is celebrated each year as Juneteenth, in honor of the day in 1865 when enslaved men and women in…

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Former slaves harvesting for their own profit.

Land loss has plagued black America since emancipation – is it time to look again at ‘black commons’ and collective ownership?

By Reparations

Black farmers own far less land than they did in 1910 and the racial gap in homeownership is at the highest level for 50 years. By Julian Agyeman and Kofi Boone — Underlying the recent unrest sweeping U.S. cities over police brutality is a fundamental inequity in wealth, land and power that has circumscribed black lives since the end of slavery in the U.S. The “40 acres and a mule” promised to…

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Watchmen: “Tulsa race massacre” of 1921

Trampling on the Graves of Our Ancestors: Trump’s Juneteenth “MAGA” Rally in Tulsa

By Vantage Point Articles

Changing the Date Does Not Matter Vantage Point Articles & Essays By Dr. Ron Daniels — “Their Blood Cries Out:” The Tulsa Massacre and the Destruction of Black Wall Street was the moving theme of a Virtual National Forum on May 31st sponsored by the National African American Reparations Commission (NAARC), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Human Rights Watch (HRW) and a dedicated group of local Sponsors which included…

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Juneteenth Forum to Address COVID-19, Killing of Black People, Reparations and HR-40

By COVID-19 (Coronavirus), Events, NAARC Posts, News & Current Affairs, Reparations

A National African American Commission Virtual Forum The Growing Demand for Reparations Juneteenth Forum to Address COVID-19, Killing of Black People National Commission Seeks to Advance HR-40 The National African American Reparations Commission (NAARC) announced that the commission will convene its premier National Virtual Forum on Juneteenth/June 19th, the African American holiday which commemorates the end of slavery in the U.S. The theme for the Forum is – Juneteenth, COVID…

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Vantage Point: Making of Newark’s First Black Mayor • Trump’s Juneteenth MAGA Tulsa Rally

By News & Current Affairs, Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Vantage Point Radio June 15, 2020 — On this edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with guests Junius Williams, Esq. and Rev. Robert Turner. Monday’s Premium Calling on WBAI Buddies Monday’s Topics The Making of Newark’s First Black Mayor Trump’s Outrageous Juneteenth MAGA Tulsa Rally Monday’s Guests Junius Williams,Esq., Historian, Human Rights Activist, Newark, NJ Rev. Robert Turner, Pastor, Historic Vernon AME Church, Tulsa,…

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Enslaved Africans serving in Nieu Amsterdam

North America’s First Freed Black Settlement Right in our NYC Neighborhood

By Reparations

By Sarah Bean Apmann, GVSHP — According to historian Christopher Moore, the first legally emancipated community of people of African descent in North America was found in Lower Manhattan, comprising much of present-day Greenwich Village and the South Village, and parts of the Lower East Side and East Village. This settlement was comprised of individual landholdings, many of which belonged to former “company slaves” of the Dutch West India Company. These former slaves, both men…

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