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Inequality Archives - Page 5 of 6 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Garifuna Coalition USA

New York-based Group to Celebrate Garifuna Heritage

By News & Current Affairs

The month-long celebrations will give the people in New York City a chance to recognize and appreciate Garifuna history and traditions. The New York City-based Garifuna Coalition USA, Inc, is marking the month of May as the Garifuna-America heritage month, to commemorate the 221st anniversary of the forced displacement of the Garifuna people by the British from the St. Vincent and the Grenadines on March 11th, 1797, and their settlement…

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A billion-dollar industry, a racist legacy: being black and growing pot in America

A billion-dollar industry, a racist legacy: being black and growing pot in America

By Commentaries/Opinions

What does it take to succeed as a young black entrepreneur in a sector largely dominated by white men seen as daring trailblazers? By Rose Hackman —  Three years ago, Jesce Horton, a former engineer in his early 30s, quit his corporate job to set up his own small, family-owned cannabis cultivation business in Portland, Oregon. Horton is part of a nascent industry that netted $6.7bn last year and is projected to reach $50bn by 2026….

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Group shot of storytellers at TMI Project's inaugural #blackstoriesmatter performance, which debuted on March 25, 2017 at the Pointe of Praise Church in Kingston, NY. Photo courtesy of TMI Project.

Why Black Stories Matter: They Build Empathy and Heal Trauma

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Isabelle Morrison — When she was growing up, Rachel Bailey was taught that only rich, self-indulgent White people suffered from mental health issues. Black people were supposed to be tougher. Although she remembers struggling with what was later diagnosed as bipolar disorder since she was 4 years old, it wasn’t until age 34 that she began to seek treatment, checking herself into a psychiatric ward after a…

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"Here we're proving—with data and analysis spanning 50 years—that the problem is both structural barriers for the poor in hiring, housing, policing, and more, as well as a system that prioritizes war and the wealthy over people and the environment they live in," said John Cavanagh, director of the Institute for Policy Studies. (Photo: Poor People's Campaign/Twitter)

Decrying System That Favors ‘War and the Wealthy,’ Poor People’s Campaign Unveils Agenda to Combat Poverty, Racism, and Militarism

By Commentaries/Opinions

“The Democrats talk about the middle class. The Republicans talk about the military. No one’s talking about the poor.” By Jake Johnson — In the spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s original campaign against poverty that kicked off 50 years ago next month, leaders of the Poor People’s Campaign (PPC) on Tuesday announced plans to revive Dr. King’s radical moral vision with mass action nationwide and unveiled a series of ambitious demands aimed…

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Maurice Mitchell, left, the new national director of the Working Families Party, with his predecessor, Dan Cantor, at the Working Families Party office in Brooklyn, New York. Rafael Shimunov / Working Families Party

Economic vs. Racial Justice Is a ‘False Choice,’ Says the New Working Families Party Director

By Commentaries/Opinions

Maurice Mitchell wants the WFP to be a political home for working-class people of every race. By Collier Meyerson — The Working Families Party, a progressive political political party that is active in 19 states, just announced that its longtime national director, Dan Cantor, has been succeeded in the role by Maurice Mitchell. The first black person to hold the post, Mitchell has two decades of experience in political and…

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William A. Darity Jr.

For Reparations: A Conversation With William A. Darity Jr.

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

William A. Darity Jr. is the Samuel DuBois Cook Professor of Public Policy, African and African American Studies, and Economics and the director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. The focus of his work is on inequality based on race, class, and ethnicity. He has been published in The Atlantic, The New York Times, and most recently Jacobin Magazine. He is currently co-writing with…

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Women and the Racial Wealth Divide

Women and the Racial Wealth Divide

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Dedrick Asante-Muhammad — As Women’s History Month comes to an end, we at the Racial Wealth Divide Initiative think it is important to reflect upon how racial economic inequality intersects with gender economic inequality. Overall, women earn lower wages and experience higher levels of poverty than men. This holds for Black and Latina women, who also earn lower wages and experience higher poverty rates than White and Asian women….

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Slave ship diagram, first printed as a broadside in England in 1789

The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism

By Reparations

What is euphemistically referred to as “modernity” is marked with the indelible stain of what might be termed the Three Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Slavery, White Supremacy, and Capitalism, with the bloody process of human bondage as the driving and animating force of this abject horror. By Gerald Horne — The years between 1603 and 1714 were perhaps the most decisive in English history. At the onset of the seventeenth…

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Black Wealth

Two Americas: Upward Mobility for White vs. Black Children

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Maggie R. Jones and Sonya Porter — In our most recent study, we analyze racial differences in economic opportunity using data on 20 million children and their parents. We show black children have much lower rates of upward mobility and higher rates of downward mobility than white children, leading to black-white income disparities that persist across generations. While Hispanic and black Americans presently have comparable…

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Rich black kids are more likely to go to prison than poor white kids

Sons of Rich Black Families Fare No Better Than Sons of Working-Class Whites

By News & Current Affairs

By Emily Badger, Claire Cain Miller, Adam Pearce and Kevin Quealy, New York Times — Black boys raised in America, even in the wealthiest families and living in some of the most well-to-do neighborhoods, still earn less in adulthood than white boys with similar backgrounds, according to a sweeping new study that traced the lives of millions of children. White boys who grow up rich are likely to remain that…

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