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Jim Crow Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Attny Nkechi Taifa

The New Terrorism, Like The Old Terrorism

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Nkechi Taifa, Esq.— WASHINGTON (Trice Edney News Wire) — I am at Ground Zero. My law degree cannot protect me. My fancy address cannot protect me. My radio appearances and Zoom book tour cannot protect me. I check with, and for, my daughter against this madness as we all should the way the Black Power Movement taught me. On the 24-hour cable television there are many references to how the…

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Courtesy-of-the-University-of-Mississippi-Department-of-Archives-and-Special-Collections

University of Mississippi professors research legacy of slavery at state’s flagship university

By Reparations

By Brittany Brown— OXFORD — Five University of Mississippi professors, along with local community organizations and other campus partners, are exploring the history and impact of slavery at the university and in the Oxford community. The University of Mississippi Slavery Research Group (UMSRG) started as a 2013 book club consisting of several faculty and administrators where they read and discussed historian Craig Steven Wilder’s book, “Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery,…

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Nancy Pelosi

An open letter to Speaker Nancy Pelosi demanding the passing of HR-40 and calls for a day of action

By Vantage Point Articles

Why We Can’t Wait: Pass HR-40 Now! Vantage Point Articles & Essays By Dr. Ron Daniels Madame Speaker, with a Democratic Majority in the House of Representatives and one of the most consequential elections in the history of this nation slated to occur in a few weeks, it’s time to send a powerful sign to Black voters that Black Lives Matter by passing HR-40 now! 2020 marks thirty-one years since the…

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Why African Americans Were More Likely to Die During the 1918 Flu Pandemic

Why African Americans Were More Likely to Die During the 1918 Flu Pandemic

By Commentaries/Opinions, COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

By Rodney A. Brooks — When it came to getting healthcare during the 1918 influenza epidemic, America’s Black communities, hobbled by poverty, Jim Crow segregation and rampant discrimination, were mostly forced to fend for themselves. Opportunities for hospital care proved scarce, leaving many relying on family care and, where available, the small but burgeoning ranks of Black nurses. When the 1918 influenza epidemic began, African Americans were already beset by a barrage of social, medical…

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Protest outside the Minnesota State Capitol demanding reparations, St Paul MN, June 19 2020.

It’s Time for Reparations and Transitional Justice for African Americans

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

The country needs truth-telling and acceptance of our moral, legal, political, and sociocultural responsibilities. By Joyce Hope Scott, BU Today — This is a transformative moment in history in the United States as well as in the rest of the world. Despite myths of a post-racial society as a result of many positive social transformations, we are today again forced to examine our inheritance of America’s great sin—slavery and its…

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Robert Vane

Racism scarred Jim Crow-era Black Americans. Here’s why they deserve reparations

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

African Americans born during the 20th-century Jim Crow era were promised all the freedoms and rights of the white Americans, but instead languished in the torture chamber of racism and state-sponsored bigotry. By Robert Vane — One of the most meaningful and impactful initiatives in our country is the Honor Flight program. It flies veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit the memorials and brings tears to all who witness it.

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88th Annual Meeting of the United States Conference of Mayors — Resolution In Support of #HR40

By Reparations

88th Annual Meeting of the United States Conference of Mayors Resolution In Support of the Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans Act (H.R 40/S. 1083) WHEREAS, Congress finds that four million Africans and their descendants were brought to this land and enslaved in the American colonies beginning in 1619, and slavery was an institution that was statutorily upheld by the federal government of the United States…

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Black Lives Matter Rally Photo by David Geitgey Sierralupe,

America has its knee on the necks of Black & Brown People

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Don Rojas — Today America is at a crossroads, a turning point…at an intersection of the old imperial order at home and abroad with the birthing of a new order, “a new normal” if you will. For millions of people in America, the unprecedented street uprisings of the past 10 days offer a glimmer of hope that after 350 years of oppression, meaningful change may actually be on the…

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Slave Patrol

Citizen’s Arrest: Racist at its Roots

By Editors' Choice

By Alan J. Singer, HNN — The video-recorded murder of Ahmaud Arbery, a young Black man killed by two white vigilantes while jogging near Brunswick, Georgia, has focused attention on Georgia’s Civil War era Citizen’s Arrest law. The current version of Georgia Citizen’s Arrest Law, 17-4-60 (2010), states: “A private person may arrest an offender if the offense is committed in his presence or within his immediate knowledge. If the offense is a…

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Homeless in NYC Subway

Inequality and the Coronavirus, Or How to Destroy American Society From the Top Down

By Commentaries/Opinions, COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

By Liz Theoharis — My mom contracted polio when she was 14. She survived and learned to walk again, but my life was deeply affected by that virus. Today, as our larger society attempts to self-distance and self-isolate, my family has texted about the polio quarantine my mom was put under: how my grandma fearfully checked my aunt’s temperature every night because she shared a bedroom with my mom; how they…

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