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Lynching Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Lavinia Baker and her five surviving children after the lynching of her husband and baby on Feb. 22, 1898.

Post office to be named for black postmaster who was lynched in 1898

By | News & Current Affairs

Frazier B. Baker was the first black postmaster in Lake City, South Carolina. By Associated Press — LAKE CITY, S.C. — A South Carolina town’s post office will be named in honor of its first black postmaster, Frazier B. Baker, who was lynched in 1898 after he refused to resign. U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., introduced a bill to rename the office after Baker, saying it would ensure that his…

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Noose found at MS State Capitol

Seven nooses, signs found at Mississippi State Capitol

By | News & Current Affairs

The nooses and signs were found one day before the U.S. Senate runoff. State Capitol police took the nooses and signs down and are investigating. By Morgan Howard, WLBT Jackson, MS — Seven nooses and several signs were found at the Mississippi State Capitol Monday, prompting more nationwide attention and outrage ahead of Tuesday’s election. Early Monday morning, two nooses were found at the Capitol. According to the Associated Press, five more…

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President Donald Trump will travel to Mississippi to stump for a candidate who spoke favorably of lynching and voter disenfranchisement.

Trump’s Racism Doesn’t Have To Be A Political Strategy. Sometimes It’s Just Racism.

By | Commentaries/Opinions

By Ja’han Jones, Huff Post — In 1955, after the nation’s most infamous lynching ― of her son, Emmett ― Mamie Till-Mobley sent a telegram to President Dwight Eisenhower. In it, she pleaded with Eisenhower to “see that justice [was] meted out to all persons involved” in her son’s murder, which took place in Money, Mississippi. She received nothing in response — not correspondence from the White House and not…

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IBW21.org Post Featured Image FPO

Lynching, racial reconciliation and reparations

By | Commentaries/Opinions

Sundiata Cha-Jua, The News Gazette — In recent years, the U.S. government has demonstrated a commitment to passing largely meaningless symbolic legislation designed to sanitize the country’s history of racial wrongs. The recent introduction of bills in the House and Senate apologizing for lynchings continues this timorous tradition. In 1997, President Bill Clinton apologized for the Tuskegee Experiment, the U.S. Public Health Service’s Nazi-like study of the effects of syphilis…

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Why Emmett Till Won’t and Shouldn’t Die

By | Commentaries/Opinions

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson, The Hutchinson Report — The news that the Justice Department will take another look at the Emmett Till case stirred the never-ending memory I have of that September day in 1955. That was the day of Till’s funeral at Roberts Temple Church of God on Chicago’s Southside. Then I lived only a few blocks from the church. The elementary school I attended was also close to the…

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Sen. Kamala Harris

African-American Senators Introduce Anti-Lynching Bill

By | News & Current Affairs

By Vanessa Romo, NPR — Congress’s three African-American senators introduced a bipartisan bill Friday to make lynching a federal crime. Sens. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Tim Scott, R-S.C., drafted the bipartisan legislation, which defines the crime as “the willful act of murder by a collection of people assembled with the intention of committing an act of violence upon any person.” It also classifies lynching as a hate…

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The white Southern press played a role in the racial terrorism of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which saw thousands of African-Americans hanged, burned, drowned or beaten to death by white mobs.

When Southern Newspapers Justified Lynching

By | Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

The white Southern press played a role in the racial terrorism of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which saw thousands of African-Americans hanged, burned, drowned or beaten to death by white mobs. By Brent Staples — The Arkansas lynch mob that burned a black tenant farmer at the stake in 1921 observed common practice when it advertised the killing in advance so spectators could mark the grisly event…

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Visitors at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama, April 26.

Lynching Didn’t Disappear, It Just Evolved

By | Commentaries/Opinions

By A.T. McWilliams — While visiting the newly opened National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama — a hallowed and harrowing enshrinement bearing the names of over 4,000 black people lynched in the Jim Crow South — I was reminded of stories my grandparents told me as a child. Stories of my great-grandfather, once chased by Ku Klux Klan members on horseback before swimming to safety, preferring possible death by drowning…

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Why America Must Atone for its Lynchings

Why America Must Atone for its Lynchings

By | Commentaries/Opinions

How white Americans used lynchings to terrorize and control black people. By Ed Pilkington in Montgomery, Alabama — Vanessa Croft was driving home after work in Gadsden, Alabama, last month when she noticed something strange in her rear-view mirror. There were two huge flags bearing the starred cross of the Confederacy fluttering angrily behind her from the back of a menacing black pickup truck. She had seen plenty of Confederate flags…

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Montgomery, Alabama - The Legacy Museum and the Memorial for Peace and Justice

No Reconciliation Without Truth

By | Commentaries/Opinions

A new museum and lynching memorial in Montgomery, Alabama, constitute a watershed moment in the way America remembers its racist past. By Caleb Gayle — When it comes to the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow, there are two kinds of monuments in America. There are memorials that seek to honor this country’s fitful march toward civil rights. Then there are the statues of generals and politicians—as well as the…

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