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Lynching Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Historical marker remembering 1903 lynching of George White

Sen. Darius Brown, Shepherd family respond to theft of historical lynching marker

By News & Current Affairs

WILMINGTON – On Friday, it was reported that the historical marker recognizing the lynching of George White, unveiled just over a month ago, was stolen from Greenbank Park on Kirkwood Highway. The historical marker appeared to have been pulled out of the ground, leaving a hole where it once stood. According to officials at the Delaware Public Archives who oversee historical markers in the state, the concrete footing that secured the…

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Mary Turner and the Lynching Rampage of 1918

No More Mary Turners

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — Mary Turner was lynched on May 19. 1918 because she dared raise her voice. Her husband, Hayes Turner, was among 13 people lynched in two weeks in and around Valdosta, Georgia. The lynchings took place because one brutal white man, who was known to abuse workers so severely that he was only able to attract workers by getting them through the convict labor system, beat the…

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The bronze statue called "Raise Up" at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a memorial to honor thousands of people killed in lynchings, on April 23, 2018, in Montgomery, Ala.

White supremacy must be undone — institution by institution

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Michael Gerson, The Washington Post — The national debate on race — which the president has made more angry and urgent with his racial demagoguery — is hindered by imprecise language. Most whites do not feel personally guilty for the United States’ long history of imposed white supremacy. A white man who has lost his job at the coal mine, or the daughter of a recent Ukrainian immigrant, probably…

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Lynchings happened across the U.S., including the 1916 lynching of Jesse Washington in Waco, Texas.

Maryland has created a truth commission on lynchings – can it deliver?

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Kelebogile Zvobgo — Between 1850 and 1950, thousands of African American men, women and children were victims of lynchings: public torture and killings carried out by white mobs. Lynchings were used to terrorize and control black people, notably in the South following the end of slavery. Yet despite the prevalence and seriousness of the practice, there has been an “astonishing absence of any effort to acknowledge, discuss, or address lynching,” reports the Equal…

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Lavinia Baker and her five surviving children after the lynching of her husband and baby on Feb. 22, 1898.

Post office to be named for black postmaster who was lynched in 1898

By News & Current Affairs

Frazier B. Baker was the first black postmaster in Lake City, South Carolina. By Associated Press — LAKE CITY, S.C. — A South Carolina town’s post office will be named in honor of its first black postmaster, Frazier B. Baker, who was lynched in 1898 after he refused to resign. U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., introduced a bill to rename the office after Baker, saying it would ensure that his…

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Noose found at MS State Capitol

Seven nooses, signs found at Mississippi State Capitol

By News & Current Affairs

The nooses and signs were found one day before the U.S. Senate runoff. State Capitol police took the nooses and signs down and are investigating. By Morgan Howard, WLBT Jackson, MS — Seven nooses and several signs were found at the Mississippi State Capitol Monday, prompting more nationwide attention and outrage ahead of Tuesday’s election. Early Monday morning, two nooses were found at the Capitol. According to the Associated Press, five more…

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President Donald Trump will travel to Mississippi to stump for a candidate who spoke favorably of lynching and voter disenfranchisement.

Trump’s Racism Doesn’t Have To Be A Political Strategy. Sometimes It’s Just Racism.

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Ja’han Jones, Huff Post — In 1955, after the nation’s most infamous lynching ― of her son, Emmett ― Mamie Till-Mobley sent a telegram to President Dwight Eisenhower. In it, she pleaded with Eisenhower to “see that justice [was] meted out to all persons involved” in her son’s murder, which took place in Money, Mississippi. She received nothing in response — not correspondence from the White House and not…

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IBW21.org Post Featured Image FPO

Lynching, racial reconciliation and reparations

By Commentaries/Opinions

Sundiata Cha-Jua, The News Gazette — In recent years, the U.S. government has demonstrated a commitment to passing largely meaningless symbolic legislation designed to sanitize the country’s history of racial wrongs. The recent introduction of bills in the House and Senate apologizing for lynchings continues this timorous tradition. In 1997, President Bill Clinton apologized for the Tuskegee Experiment, the U.S. Public Health Service’s Nazi-like study of the effects of syphilis…

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Why Emmett Till Won’t and Shouldn’t Die

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson, The Hutchinson Report — The news that the Justice Department will take another look at the Emmett Till case stirred the never-ending memory I have of that September day in 1955. That was the day of Till’s funeral at Roberts Temple Church of God on Chicago’s Southside. Then I lived only a few blocks from the church. The elementary school I attended was also close to the…

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Sen. Kamala Harris

African-American Senators Introduce Anti-Lynching Bill

By News & Current Affairs

By Vanessa Romo, NPR — Congress’s three African-American senators introduced a bipartisan bill Friday to make lynching a federal crime. Sens. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Tim Scott, R-S.C., drafted the bipartisan legislation, which defines the crime as “the willful act of murder by a collection of people assembled with the intention of committing an act of violence upon any person.” It also classifies lynching as a hate…

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