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Poverty Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

The Homelessness Crisis – We Are Better Than This

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — I was returning from an errand when the skies opened up. The punishing rain came down with such vigor that despite an umbrella, the bottom inches of my pants were soaked. With my wash and wear hair, and just half a block more to walk, I shrugged the rain off, until I saw a woman sheltering herself from the rain in a narrow but covered side…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Poverty and the Fallacy of Long-Term Economic Greatness

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — The first week of July produced a somewhat positive Employment Situation report. While the unemployment rate ticked up just a bit, about 224,000 new jobs were created, nearly three times as many as were created in the tepid previous month. There was, of course, the Administration crowing about the strength of the economy, and with wage growth on the rise, an impassioned outsider might agree that…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Running for Exposure

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — Twenty-four people are running for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States.  From where I sit, at least half of them are only running for exposure, for the Vice-Presidential nod, for Cabinet secretary, to push a platform, or to simply be seen.  Their ambitions have made the process turgid and impractical, often amusing and only sometimes illuminating. The candidates do best when they have…

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Protest for Economic and Racial Justice in Lousiville, Kentucky as part of the 2014 United Methodist Women's General Assembly. Image by Brittney Drakeford.

City planners need to talk about race. The lives of our residents depend on it.

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Brittney Drakeford and Ras Tafari Cannady II, Greater Greater Washington — The effects of historic discriminatory urban design practices, such as redlining and racially-restrictive zoning, are by no means relegated to the past. New research shows how discriminatory land use practices continue to degrade the health of people of color to this day. In order to build more equitable communities, planners must better understand and acknowledge this legacy of discrimination—and actively…

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A woman shops for food at the St. Vincent de Paul food pantry in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Want to Eradicate Hunger in America? Take on Racism.

By Commentaries/Opinions

A new study found that people who experience discrimination are almost twice as likely as others to struggle with hunger. By Greg Kaufmann, The Nation — With more than 40 million people in the country struggling with hunger, anti-hunger advocates in the United States have their work cut out for them. In 2017, nearly 12 percent of all US households were food insecure—meaning they didn’t have access to enough food for all household members…

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Martin Luther King

Poverty Isn’t a Privilege: The White Man Is Your Brother Too

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Keith Magee — Writing to fellow clergy from a Birmingham Jail (The Negro Is Your Brother), Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – gravely concerned about all who were poor and experiencing inequality – said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” The world, especially,…

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A homeless woman sits on a bench a few blocks away from the White House, Washington, 1 September 2015. Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

The Respect Deficit

By Editors' Choice

Economic inequality is an urgent problem. Deeper still is our loss of mutual respect, the foundation of a fair society. By Richard Reeves, Aeon — At the end of 2017, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority launched a new ad campaign. The Authority wasn’t selling anything. It was asking, on behalf of its bus drivers, for something; something that liberal societies need in order to flourish, that underpins social equality, and…

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About 12.7 percent of Americans lived below the poverty line in 2016.

Why the war on poverty in the US isn’t over, in 4 charts

By Editors' Choice

By Robert L. Fischer, The Conversation — On July 12, President Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers concluded that America’s long-running war on poverty “is largely over and a success.” I am a researcher who has studied poverty for nearly 20 years in Cleveland, a city with one of the country’s highest rates of poverty. While the council’s conclusion makes for a dramatic headline, it simply does not align with the reality of poverty in the U.S.…

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Louise Brown, 83, at the Poor People’s Campaign rally in Washington, D.C., on June 23. The movement aims to link a broad array of issues: systemic racism, poverty and inequality, ecological devastation and the war economy.

The Poor People’s Campaign Is Using Civil Disobedience to Win Back America

By News & Current Affairs

The 50-year-old anti-poverty movement has seen a revival in the era of Trump. By Teke Wiggin, HuffPost — When lifelong civil rights activist Louise Brown took the mic at a Washington, D.C., rally on Saturday, she had a stark message for the thousands of people assembled before her to protest poverty. “I’m 83 years old, and only the strong survive,” she shouted. In a call to arms, she recounted how…

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United Nations

UN Special Rapporteur’s Report on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights

By Editors' Choice

Report of the Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights on his mission to the United States of America Note by the Secretariat The Secretariat has the honour to transmit to the Human Rights Council the report of the Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Philip Alston, on his mission to the United States of America from 1 to 15 December 2017. The purpose of the visit…

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