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Race

Barbara Smith, Isra Hirsi, Aja Monet, Kenidra Woods, and Rachel Gilmer (L-R),

Bernie Sanders Earns Support From Black Women Activists

By Editors' Choice

In this conversation, moderated by the Dream Defenders’ Rachel Gilmer, Black women activists explain their support for Sanders’s campaign. By Teen Vougue — Senator Bernie Sanders has attributed his success in the 2020 presidential campaign to his “multigenerational, multiracial coalition” of supporters. Sanders’s win in Iowa has been credited in part to his support among the minority and immigrant voters who turned out to the “satellite” caucuses set up for those who couldn’t make it to…

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People watch results at Joe Biden’s campaign rally on the night of the New Hampshire primary in Columbia, South Carolina, 11 February 2020.

South Carolina: how black Americans’ reverse migration is reshaping next state to vote

By News & Current Affairs

Black Americans’ relocation back to the south is changing voting blocs and making Democratic races more competitive. This month, for the first time, South Carolina registered a million voters of color. By Kenya Evelyn, The Guardian — Najeema Davis Washington spent more than 15 years as a federal employee in Washington DC before she returned to Charleston, the city she left in 1996. She brought with her a progressive outlook…

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African-American students from Saint Augustine College study while participating in a sit-in at a lunch counter reserved for white customers in Raleigh, N.C.

What People Still Get Wrong About Segregation

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Andrew Joseph Pegoda — During Black History Month and beyond, Americans are generally taught to believe that contact between white and black Americans was gradually prohibited after Reconstruction through a combination of social and legal traditions. Under the regime of Jim Crow segregation, two supposedly “separate but equal” societies gradually emerged — one for white people, another for black people — and lasted until the ’50s and ’60s. The two societies in that infamous phrase were never equal…

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Lanaisha Edwards

‘This was supposed to be reparations’ Why is LA’s cannabis industry devastating black entrepreneurs?

By News & Current Affairs, Reparations

Black merchants affected by the war on drugs are denied licenses and thrown into debt as white owners thrive. By Sam Levin, The Guardian — A Los Angeles government program set up to provide cannabis licenses to people harmed by the war on drugs has been plagued by delays, scandal and bureaucratic blunders, costing some intended beneficiaries hundreds of thousands of dollars in losses. Black entrepreneurs and activists across LA told…

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“Colfax Massacre” in Louisiana.

‘The War of Races’: How a hateful ideology echoes through American history

By Editors' Choice

From slavery to Reconstruction to Dylann Roof, the idea of “race war” has a long and bloody legacy in the United States. By Michael E. Miller, The Washington Post — It was high noon on Easter 1873 when the white mob came riding into Colfax. Five months earlier, Louisiana had held its second election since the end of the Civil War and the beginning of black male suffrage. But some…

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‘Suggesting that whiteness has no meaning creates an alienating – even hostile – climate for people of color working and living in predominantly white environments.’

White people assume niceness is the answer to racial inequality. But it’s not.

By Commentaries/Opinions

While most of us see ourselves as ‘not racist’, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives. By Robin diAngelo, The Guardian — I am white. As an academic, consultant and writer on white racial identity and race relations, I speak daily with other white people about the meaning of race in our lives. These conversations are critical because, by virtually every measure, racial inequality persists, and institutions…

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