Skip to main content
Tag

Ta-Nehisi Coates Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

black-strong-art-graphic-910x512

Repaying the debt owed to Black people requires a democratic and reparative economy

By News & Current Affairs

The entire racial capitalist system that extracts labor and blood from Black lives must go. By Dr. Ron Daniels, Rev. Ronald Galvin — America owes Black folks. The modern-day prophet Ta-Nahesi Coates, drawing on the wisdom and generations-old fight of Black freedom fighters such as Mother Callie House, James Forman, Randall Robinson, and the Malcolm X grassroots movement, cogently made the case in his seminal article, “The Case for Reparations”,…

Read More
slavery-part-12-featured-american-flag-transatlantic-910x512

The Transatlantic Slave Trade: A Day of Remembrance

By Reparations

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent — NNPA NEWSWIRE — “It is important to recognize the International Decade for People of African Descent as an international corrective to combat the systematic indoctrination of the lie of African inferiority,” said Dr. Kevin Cokley, the director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis. “Passing H.R. 40 would count as the most significant legislative achievement to impact the…

Read More
Nkechi Taifa

Sister Search: Remembering my Howard University Roots During this Women’s History Month

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Nkechi Taifa — To say I was an “interesting” teenager is an understatement. Once upon a revolutionary time, I was a Black Power teen who lived in the once Chocolate City but went to an all-white, all girl high school. I hung out, however, with Black Panthers and brothers from the Nam, recited poetry, attended organizing meetings for the first U.S.-based African Liberation Day, and celebrated Kwanzaa. And upon my high…

Read More
Nkechi Taifa

Of Terror and Promise: On This MLK Day, There’s No Better Time to Call for Reparatory Justice!

By Editors' Choice

By Nkechi Taifa— The terror Blacks feel is in our bones. For me, it began when white storm clouds of terror hung over the home of Mose Wright late one August night in 1955, when white, armed terrorists demanded his great-nephew, 14-year-old Emmett Till, be handed over to them. I was scarcely eight months old. Young Emmett had made the mistake of being from Chicago and, not heeding “The Talk” his…

Read More
Support the movement street art

Black Movement Organizations Call for Reparations Instead of Giving Tuesday

By Reparations

By Sofia Jarrin— A coalition of Black organizations have decided to skip #GivingTuesday and call for justice by reimagining relationships, repairing harm, and reorganizing economies. Through the #ReparationsMonday campaign, leaders of the Movement for Black Lives (M4BL) called for more transformational giving strategies to promote systemic change. Instead of requesting the traditional #GivingTuesday donations, which M4BL advocates say promotes an unequal system where organizations “with the largest PR budgets…receive the bulk of…

Read More
Reparations-Now-Black-Americans

Yes, Black Americans are entitled to reparations. We’ve earned them.

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

The legacy of slavery — and the centuries of theft it entails — does not dwell in the long-forgotten past for Black people. It’s our now. By Michelle Singletary, Washington Post — Dear Reader, Some of my happiest moments were nursing my three children. As I looked down at their faces, their fingers tangled in my hair, I felt enormous peace and joy. I never took nursing my babies for…

Read More
Ta-Nehisi Coates

Ta-Nehisi Coates on The Great Chicago Fire

By Editors' Choice

“Whiteness thrives in darkness,” Coates writes. “So it was with the slave narrative. So it is with the cell phone.” By Ta-Nehisi Coates, Vanity Fair — Last year Chicago poet Eve L. Ewing published 1919, a volume that channels her city’s Red Summer into blues. It is a magical work. The voices of house-keepers and stockyard hands are summoned. The thoughts of trains carrying black people north are conjured up. The doom of…

Read More
free men, women, and children in Richmond, Va., 1865

Calling on white Americans: Reparations for slavery are due

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

The legacy of slavery is far from resolved. It persists every day and everywhere. By David Gardinier and Karen Hilfman, The Boston Globe — Since the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis by a white police officer, and the resounding anti-racist uprisings around the world, the concept of reparations has picked up momentum in national conversations and has sparked new public curiosity and interest. Among Black people and their ancestors,…

Read More
88th-annual-meeting-of-the-united-states-conference-of-mayors-logo

88th Annual Meeting of the United States Conference of Mayors — Resolution In Support of #HR40

By Reparations

88th Annual Meeting of the United States Conference of Mayors Resolution In Support of the Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans Act (H.R 40/S. 1083) WHEREAS, Congress finds that four million Africans and their descendants were brought to this land and enslaved in the American colonies beginning in 1619, and slavery was an institution that was statutorily upheld by the federal government of the United States…

Read More
George Floyd protest

After George Floyd and Juneteenth

By Commentaries/Opinions

What’s ahead for the movement, the election, and the protesters? By David Remnick, The New Yorker — Tennille Newbold is a twenty-six-year-old medical assistant at a community health center in Manhattan. In the midst of a Juneteenth celebration in Central Park—a kind of barbecue-picnic political rally, on the grounds of what was once Seneca Village, where freed black people and Irish immigrants lived—she stepped to a microphone and announced that…

Read More
Celebration of the Abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia by the Colored People, in Washington, April 19, 1866,”

Since Emancipation, the United States Has Refused to Make Reparations for Slavery

By Reparations

But in 1862, the federal government doled out the 2020 equivalent of $23 million – NOT to the formerly enslaved but to their white enslavers. By Kali Holloway, The Nation — In 1870 a black woman named Henrietta Wood sued the white deputy sheriff who, nearly two decades earlier, kidnapped her from the free state of Ohio, illegally transported her to slaveholding Kentucky, and sold her into a life of enslavement that…

Read More
Ta-Nehisi Coates

The Case for Reparations Is Nothing New

By Reparations

In fact, Black activists and civil rights leaders have been advocating for compensation for the trauma and cost of slavery for centuries. By Mohammed Elnaiem, JSTOR Daily — In July 2019, thousands of Americans took to their television sets, phones, and laptops to watch Ta-Nehisi Coates, Danny Glover, and Cory Booker testify before Congress, demanding reparations for slavery. There was a time when this debate was on the fringes; now it was…

Read More