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Black Books Archives - Page 2 of 3 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Turbulent history … Tamara Lawrance in the BBC adaptation of Andrea Levy’s The Long Song.

‘We’re still living with slavery’

By Reparations

From prize-winners Esi Edugyan and Marlon James to debut novelists such as Sara Collins, a new generation of novelists is exploring a painful past. By Colin Grant, The Guardian — Two hundred years ago, slave narratives seemed one of the few routes to publication for black writers on both sides of the Atlantic. Autobiographical accounts written by former slaves such as Olaudah Equiano, Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass proved enormously popular with readers, who…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Open a Book, Explore a World: The Philadelphia African American Children’s Book Fair

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — We hear the words “national emergency” so often from the bloviator that masquerades as a President that we forget what an emergency really looks like.  One of our most pressing crises is the educational emergency that our nation faces, with the quality of inner-city education, in particular, so lacking that many young people are graduating from high school unequipped to manage either post-secondary education or employment. …

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The first of the century, the extensive history provides an in-depth look at the voices and bodies that shaped the century.

Author Releases Century’s ‘Most Extensive Pan-African History’

By Reparations

“African history is considered rather unimportant, but the history of the African diaspora isn’t considered at all,” Hakim Adi said. By teleSur — “Pan-Africanism: A History” a recently released book written by Professor Hakim Adi is seeking to explore and create discussion about Pan-Africanism around the world, a topic the author says often goes undiscussed. From the early 1900’s til now, in his new book “Pan-Africanism: A History” Professor Hakim Adi explores…

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Mary Frances Berry

Q&A with Mary Frances Berry

By Commentaries/Opinions

The civil rights activist, historian, and author discusses her new book “History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times.”   Civil rights activist, historian, and author Mary Frances Berry insists that “each generation has a responsibility to make a dent in the wall of injustice.” Berry, the Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and a professor of history and Africana studies in the School of Arts and Sciences, has tackled…

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The Prison Letters of Nelson Mandela - Edited by Sahm Venter

A Hope Manifesto for Times of Resistance

By Editors' Choice

Mandela was not just “a brilliant political tactician and legal mind, but also an exquisite writer,” says reviewer Goff. These letters give us a man of high ideals whose “fight for survival” in prison adds Goff, “would have broken many of us.” By Keli Goff, Los Angeles Review of Books — IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE that Sahm Venter, the editor of The Prison Letters of Nelson Mandela, did not have a crystal…

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Zora Neale Hurston

Witnesses for the Future

By Commentaries/Opinions

Zora Neale Hurston’s drive to tell the story of the slave trade’s last survivor By Emily Bernard, The New Republic — “You have seen how a man was made a slave,” Frederick Douglass wrote in his 1845 autobiography, the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. “You shall see how a slave was made a man.” These words herald the moment when Douglass masters his master, the sadistic overseer and “negro-breaker,”…

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A sculpture by artist Kwame Akoto-Bamfo, part of the Nkyinkyim Installation, of enslaved people in chains is shown after entering The National Memorial for Peace and Justice on April 20, 2018, in Montgomery, Al.

“Freedom” and “Liberty” Were Only for Whites in Settler Colonialism

By Editors' Choice

By Mark Karlin, Truthout — By detailing the growth of the slave trade in the 17th century, Gerald Horne reveals how white supremacy, capitalism and the original sin of slavery in the Western Hemisphere became intertwined. Current politics are so chaotic, staggering and fast-paced that we rarely hear of how we arrived at this moment of the resurgence of white supremacy in historical context. However, Professor Gerald Horne, author of The…

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Diane Nash, right, represented the Southern Christian Leadership Conference at the White House in 1963.

The Selfless Servant Leadership of the African-American Women of the Civil-Rights Movement

By Editors' Choice

These women didn’t stand on ceremony; they accepted the risks of activism and fought for worlds where others might have freedoms that they themselves would never enjoy. By Janet Dewart Bell — During the civil-rights movement, African Americans led the fight to free this country from the vestiges of slavery and Jim Crow. Though they all too often were—and remain—invisible to the public, African-American women played significant roles at all…

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April 23rd Edition of Vantage Point with Dr. Ron Daniels

By Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

April 23rd Edition of Vantage Point Topics A New Book: Ronald W. Walters and the Fight for Black Power, 1969 – 2010 Is “Stop and Frisk” Still a Problem in New York The Quest to Establish a “Little Haiti” District in Brooklyn Guests Dr. Robert Smith, Professor of Political Science, San Francisco State University Darius Charney, Senior Staff Attorney, Center for Constitutional Rights, New York, NY Linda Tigani, Malcolm X…

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Morgan Jerkins

Essayist Morgan Jerkins on Intersectionality and Her Remarkable New Book

By Commentaries/Opinions

Jerkins talks about her insightful new essay collection ‘This Will Be My Undoing.’ Hope Reese, Vice — When Morgan Jerkins entered Princeton University at age 19, she felt that she had “made it to a place I was never supposed to be.” As a young black woman, she was a minority on campus, where fewer than 6 percent of the total population is black. In her piercing debut essay collection, This Will Be My…

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