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Coronavirus Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Diepsloot in South Africa

South Africa: The fault-lines of the world’s most unequal society

By Editors' Choice

By John Allen, All Africa — Cape Town — Amid the explosive cocktail of ingredients which contributed to the outbreak of looting and burning in South Africa this week, new fault-lines running through a society divided by class as well as by race were on display as never before. The unrest may have been triggered by the jailing of former president Jacob Zuma and exacerbated by factors ranging from orchestrated…

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Cynthia Kain and Gunnar Eggertsson

What the Pandemic Has Stolen from Black America

By Editors' Choice

By Perter Jamison, The Washington Post — The boy is perhaps 8 or 9 years old. In the black-and-white photo, his face is frozen in an open-mouthed grin, his small arms tucked respectfully behind his back. He stands alone, a Black child in dark slacks and a light, collared shirt. Pine trees rise in the blurry background, dark slashes against an overexposed sky. The second boy, who holds the photograph,…

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Vantage Point: Should Schools and Restaurants Re-Open? Open Forum with Professor Ron Daniels

By Vantage Point Radio

Vantage Point February 22, 2021 — On this edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with the callers. Open Forum Topics Controlling the Pandemic: Should Schools, Restaurants and Bars Re-Open? (Let’s Hear from Parents, Teachers, Business Owners and the Community) After Impeachment: Where Do We Go From Here? (Audience Speak-Out) Audience call-in number (212) 209-2877 Ways to listen Live (Radio) — Mondays 3-4PM on WBAI,…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Back to Normal? What’s Normal?

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — I got my first COVID vaccination last week. No big deal, an achy arm, but otherwise, just like a flu shot. The young lady who administered the shot smiled and said, “after you get your second shot, you can get back to normal.” I wanted to ask her what was normal, but the man in line behind me seemed impatient, so I smiled and made my…

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William-Lamar-Metropolitan-African-Methodist-Episcopal-Church-910x512

My church will replace our Black Lives Matter sign. Will America replace its racist myth?

By Editors' Choice

By William H. Lamar IV— The Rev. William H. Lamar IV is the pastor of the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington. Do you hear what I hear? I hear the imperial American myth in the throes of its own death rattle. And I hear a people clamoring for a story by which to order their lives. The United States does not like to call itself an empire. But…

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Vantage Point: State of Newark Report with Mayor Ras J. Baraka • Professor on the Soap Box

By Vantage Point Radio

Vantage Point December 7, 2020 — On this edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with special guest Mayor Ras J. Baraka, Newark, NJ. Topics State of Newark Report Controlling the Pandemic Are Vaccines the Answer? Assessing the Biden-Harris Transition Special Guest Mayor Ras J. Baraka, Newark, NJ Plus “The Professor” Dr. Ron Daniels on the Soap Box   Ways to listen Live (Radio) —…

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health care inequality

Some experts propose reparations as solution for decades of racial health inequities

By Reparations

“Cash restitution would save lives,” one expert says. By Dr. Divya Chhabra— As COVID-19 exacerbates long standing health inequities affecting the Black population, a growing chorus of experts suggest reparations could help narrow the divide. The concept of government-issued reparations for the descendants of slaves has been discussed for decades, with national figures like Sen. Kamala Harris expressing some level of support. California, Illinois and Washington, D.C., have introduced bills to study how to best implement reparations for historical injustices placed…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

COVID Halts Women’s Workplace Progress

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Economic recovery will be a long time coming. The Federal Reserve Bank says our corona recession will last into 2021, and perhaps even into 2022. If a vaccine is developed, a distribution plan still needs to be worked out, and there is still so much we don’t know about COVID. We do know that our economy has slowed and is only inching toward normalcy. We…

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Election Eve Edition of Vantage Point: Mayor Ras J. Baraka on COVID-19 Pandemic and Power of the Vote

By Vantage Point Radio, Video/Audio

Vantage Point November 2, 2020 — On this Election Eve Edition of Vantage Point, host Dr. Ron Daniels aka The Professor talks with special guest Mayor Ras J. Baraka, Newark, NJ. Topics State of Newark Updates Combating the COVID-19 Pandemic The Power of the Vote for Social Justice Post-Election National Town Hall Meeting Special Guest Mayor Ras J. Baraka, Newark, NJ Plus “The Professor” Dr. Ron Daniels on the Soap…

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Screenshot from CARICOM Reparations Commission's website

The Caribbean’s case for reparations: Part 3

By Reparations

This is the third article in a series that highlights the question of slavery reparations in the Caribbean. (The first is here; the second is here.) It is based around issues discussed in the NGC Bocas Lit Fest’s live stream event, “The Case for Reparations,” which featured an in-depth conversation with Sir Hilary Beckles, chair of the CARICOM Reparations Commission. COVID-19 has revealed “horrendous legacies” of inequity By Janine Mendes-Franco — Five hundred and twenty-eight…

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Why African Americans Were More Likely to Die During the 1918 Flu Pandemic

Why African Americans Were More Likely to Die During the 1918 Flu Pandemic

By Commentaries/Opinions, COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

By Rodney A. Brooks — When it came to getting healthcare during the 1918 influenza epidemic, America’s Black communities, hobbled by poverty, Jim Crow segregation and rampant discrimination, were mostly forced to fend for themselves. Opportunities for hospital care proved scarce, leaving many relying on family care and, where available, the small but burgeoning ranks of Black nurses. When the 1918 influenza epidemic began, African Americans were already beset by a barrage of social, medical…

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Didier William: Dancing, Pouring, Crackling and Mourning, 201

Mourning in Place

By Editors' Choice

By Edwidge Danticat, NYREV — My neighbor died recently. I saw the ambulance arrive. The red and blue strobes bounced off every glass surface on both sides of our block. She was eighty years old, and ambulances had come for her before. There was that time she broke her arm in her backyard, and already accustomed to osteoporotic and arthritic pain, she treated herself until her movements led to other…

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