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Jim Crow Laws Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

A group of black southerners raise their hands as they take an oath during a voter registration drive in Belzoni, Mississippi, in June 1966.

Welcome to Jim Crow 2.0

By Editors' Choice

Voter suppression efforts will only get worse. By Charles Blow, NYT — In the wake of the Civil War, liberals in the North went about establishing Reconstruction, passing the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments, greatly expanding the rights of Black people in America, and putting severe restrictions on Southern states before they could be readmitted to the Union. But of course, the Northern liberals soon grew impatient with and tired…

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Sen. John Barrasso, Senate Minority Whip Sen. John Thune, Sen. Rick Scott and Senate Minority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell

GOP-led voter suppression is being implemented step by step — Just like Jim Crow

By Editors' Choice

Five generations after the original Jim Crow edifice was built, the GOP has dedicated itself to mass disenfranchisement. By Sasha Abramsky, Truthout — Around the country, Republican legislators are using straw man arguments about voter fraud to push increasing restrictions on access to the ballot box. In response, President Joe Biden and others have slammed the changes as “un-American,” rhetorically downplaying the violence of voter suppression that has in fact been at…

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Germany faced its horrible past. Can we do the same?

What America’s racial reckoning can learn from Germany’s atonement with the Holocaust

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

Germany faced its horrible past. Can we do the same? By Michele L. Norris, The Washington Post — Shortly after the National Museum of African American History and Culture opened in 2016 on the National Mall, I was speaking to some patrons of a successful nonprofit about the importance of candid racial dialogue in politics and in the places we live, work and worship. One of the participants had recently…

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The Virginia Theological Seminary, in Alexandria, Va., in February began handing out cash payments to the descendants of Black Americans who labored there during the time of slavery and Jim Crow.

Seminary Built on Slavery and Jim Crow Labor Has Begun Paying Reparations

By Reparations

The Virginia Theological Seminary is giving cash to descendants of Black Americans who were forced to work there. The program is among the first of its kind. By Will Wright, The New York Times One night in 1858, Carter Dowling, an enslaved Black man forced to work without pay at the Virginia Theological Seminary in Northern Virginia, made the brave decision to escape. He made it to Philadelphia, where he…

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The Racist Past of the Filibuster and Why it Should End Now

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Stacey M. Brown— The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act and a voting and ethics bill passed the Democratic-controlled U.S. House of Representatives, but neither stands a chance in the evenly divided Senate. President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan faced fierce opposition in the Senate, but ultimately a slimmed-down version passed using the reconciliation procedure. Reconciliation is used only in rare cases. Lawmakers cannot use it for the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, the…

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Nancy Pelosi

An open letter to Speaker Nancy Pelosi demanding the passing of HR-40 and calls for a day of action

By Vantage Point Articles

Why We Can’t Wait: Pass HR-40 Now! Vantage Point Articles & Essays By Dr. Ron Daniels Madame Speaker, with a Democratic Majority in the House of Representatives and one of the most consequential elections in the history of this nation slated to occur in a few weeks, it’s time to send a powerful sign to Black voters that Black Lives Matter by passing HR-40 now! 2020 marks thirty-one years since the…

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Why African Americans Were More Likely to Die During the 1918 Flu Pandemic

Why African Americans Were More Likely to Die During the 1918 Flu Pandemic

By Commentaries/Opinions, COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

By Rodney A. Brooks — When it came to getting healthcare during the 1918 influenza epidemic, America’s Black communities, hobbled by poverty, Jim Crow segregation and rampant discrimination, were mostly forced to fend for themselves. Opportunities for hospital care proved scarce, leaving many relying on family care and, where available, the small but burgeoning ranks of Black nurses. When the 1918 influenza epidemic began, African Americans were already beset by a barrage of social, medical…

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How the Black Codes Limited African American Progress After the Civil War

How the Black Codes Limited African American Progress After the Civil War

By Reparations

The black codes effectively continued enslavement for African Americans by restricting their rights and exploiting their labor. By Nadra Kareem Nittle — When slavery ended in the United States, freedom still eluded African Americans who were contending with the repressive set of laws known as the black codes. Widely enacted throughout the South following the Civil War—a period called Reconstruction—these laws both limited the rights of Black people and exploited them as a…

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Robert Vane

Racism scarred Jim Crow-era Black Americans. Here’s why they deserve reparations

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

African Americans born during the 20th-century Jim Crow era were promised all the freedoms and rights of the white Americans, but instead languished in the torture chamber of racism and state-sponsored bigotry. By Robert Vane — One of the most meaningful and impactful initiatives in our country is the Honor Flight program. It flies veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit the memorials and brings tears to all who witness it.

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88th Annual Meeting of the United States Conference of Mayors — Resolution In Support of #HR40

By Reparations

88th Annual Meeting of the United States Conference of Mayors Resolution In Support of the Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans Act (H.R 40/S. 1083) WHEREAS, Congress finds that four million Africans and their descendants were brought to this land and enslaved in the American colonies beginning in 1619, and slavery was an institution that was statutorily upheld by the federal government of the United States…

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Black Lives Matter Rally Photo by David Geitgey Sierralupe,

America has its knee on the necks of Black & Brown People

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Don Rojas — Today America is at a crossroads, a turning point…at an intersection of the old imperial order at home and abroad with the birthing of a new order, “a new normal” if you will. For millions of people in America, the unprecedented street uprisings of the past 10 days offer a glimmer of hope that after 350 years of oppression, meaningful change may actually be on the…

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Slave Patrol

Citizen’s Arrest: Racist at its Roots

By Editors' Choice

By Alan J. Singer, HNN — The video-recorded murder of Ahmaud Arbery, a young Black man killed by two white vigilantes while jogging near Brunswick, Georgia, has focused attention on Georgia’s Civil War era Citizen’s Arrest law. The current version of Georgia Citizen’s Arrest Law, 17-4-60 (2010), states: “A private person may arrest an offender if the offense is committed in his presence or within his immediate knowledge. If the offense is a…

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