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New Orleans Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Maulana Karenga

Righteous and Relentless Struggle: Reflections on the Principle and Practice

By Dr. Maulana Karenga

By Dr. Maulana Karenga — (Remembering, reflecting and recommitting.) We cannot say it too often, stress it too much and certainly must never downplay in any way the definitive, determining and decisive role the principle and practice of righteous and relentless struggle have played in the self-conception, self-construction and self-assertion of our people and our organization Us, and the persons called into being and cultivated by both. For among the most defining…

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Sydney Labat, 24, and 14 of her Tulane University classmates posed at the Whitney Plantation in Wallace, La.

Med students send message with plantation photo: We are our ancestors’ wildest dreams

By Editors' Choice

More than a dozen medical students from Tulane University posed at the former slave quarters in the hopes of inspiring others. By Mohammed Syed and Suzanne Ciechalski — It wasn’t by chance that more than a dozen black medical students dressed in white coats and posed outside the slave quarters of a Louisiana plantation. Russell Ledet and classmates from Tulane University planned the trip and photos at the Whitney Plantation…

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NNPA President and CEO Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. and BNC

Black News Channel (BNC) A New 24/7 News Network Scheduled to Launch in November 2019

By News & Current Affairs

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA — In a joint teleconference broadcast live from the Four Season’s Hotel in New York’s Financial District, the Black News Channel (BNC) and the National Newspaper Publishers Association announced the official launch date and time for the nation’s first 24-hour, 7-days a week all-news TV channel that will focus on African American news. The new channel promises to inform, educate, and empower nearly 50 million…

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Jorian Reeves

Discovering the Excellence Within: Realizing My Greatness in South Africa

By Editors' Choice

Jorian Reeves, Xavier University of Louisiana, reflects on CIEE’s 2018 Frederick Douglass Global Fellowship experience in Cape Town. By Jorian Reeves Xavier University, Louisiana’s College of Pharmacy  I had my first taste of global cultural learning in 2015 when I traveled to Qatar at the age of 14 for a week-long Arabic debate competition. Two years earlier, in seventh grade, I had started taking Arabic classes at Lindbolm Math and…

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"Undesign the Redline," an exhibit the history of redlining and other discriminatory housing policies in New Orleans and nationwide, is on view at Tulane University's Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design through March 1, 2019.

How did a long past of racist housing policy shape New Orleans? New exhibit explores

By Gentrification, News & Current Affairs

By Jennifer Larino, The Times Picayune — What can we do to break New Orleans and its neighborhoods free from a long history of racist housing policies? That’s the question posed by “Undesign the Redline,” a traveling exhibit currently stopped at Tulane University’s Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design in Central City. A localized version of the exhibit was created by Designing the WE, a New York design firm…

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Louisiana State Penitentiary

Angola Prison in Louisiana: Proving Ground for Racialized Capitalism

By Commentaries/Opinions

By W. T. Whitney Jr., ML Today — The Civil War ended and Edward A. Pollard “of Virginia” immediately wrote a history of Confederate military operations. (1) There he insists that slavery is immune from moral blame. That’s because it “bestowed upon the world’s commerce in a half century a single product whose annual value was two hundred millions of dollars. It founded a system of industry by which labor…

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Slave Burial

5 Years After the Unmarked Graves of 1,000 Enslaved People Were Uncovered…

By Reparations

5 Years After the Unmarked Graves of 1,000 Enslaved People Were Uncovered Near a Shell Refinery, Descendants Will Be Able to Pay Their Respects Breanna Edwards, The Root — Some five years ago, the unmarked graves of as many as 1,000 enslaved people who were forced to work in the fields of plantations in Ascension Parish, La., were uncovered by an archaeologist working for Shell Convent Refinery. The discovery was…

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IBW21.org Post Featured Image FPO

In contemplating New Orleans’ future, historians reflect on city’s ‘enormous capacity for change’

By News & Current Affairs

By Della Hasselle — Alexander P. Tureaud Jr. couldn’t sleep, so he sat on a bench on the LSU campus in Baton Rouge, where he had become the first black undergraduate student until school officials and the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals forced him out. It was a foggy morning, and as a truck pulled up, Tureaud felt frightened. He had recently been subjected to threatening messages from fellow students and…

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A trial at the Destrehan Plantation sentenced 45 men from the uprising to death or to go to New Orleans for future trials.

How a Nearly Successful Slave Revolt Was Intentionally Lost to History

By Reparations

More than 500 slaves fought for their freedom in this oft-overlooked rebellion By Marissa Fessenden, Smithsonian — Two hundred and five years ago, on the night of January 8, 1811, more than 500 enslaved people took up arms in one of the largest slave rebellions in U.S. history. They carried cane knives (used to harvest sugar cane), hoes, clubs and some guns as they marched toward New Orleans chanting “Freedom or Death,” writes Leon A….

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