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Patrisse Khan-Cullors Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

George Floyd protest

After George Floyd and Juneteenth

By Commentaries/Opinions

What’s ahead for the movement, the election, and the protesters? By David Remnick, The New Yorker — Tennille Newbold is a twenty-six-year-old medical assistant at a community health center in Manhattan. In the midst of a Juneteenth celebration in Central Park—a kind of barbecue-picnic political rally, on the grounds of what was once Seneca Village, where freed black people and Irish immigrants lived—she stepped to a microphone and announced that…

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Opal Tometi

Black Lives Matter is Alive and Well

By Editors' Choice

By Opal Tometi, The Guardian Nigeria — The murder of Trayvon Benjamin Martin in 2012 and the acquittal of the ‘killer cop’ George Zimmerman revealed an already-established fact: the Black race’s freedom is only an illusion. Standing on the shoulders of his death, three black women, Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi will rise in 2013 to start a revolutionary movement called Black Lives Matter. A few weeks later, millions…

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Patrisse Cullors

Patrisse Cullors Has Already Changed America, But There Are More Rules She Wants Broken

By Commentaries/Opinions

Interview by Alicia Menendez, Bustle — Patrisse Cullors is an organizer, artist, and freedom fighter. In 2013, following the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the death of Trayvon Martin, Patrisse co-founded Black Lives Matter. As the movement to combat anti-Black racism grew, Patrisse’s work earned the LA native recognition as a visionary, and the publication of her New York Times best-selling book, When They Call You a Terrorist. As a journalist who writes about the…

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Co-founder of Black Lives Matter, Patrisse Cullors

Black Lives Matter at Five: Activists Take Stock

By News & Current Affairs

By Steve Dubb, Nonprofit Quarterly — The acquittal of George Zimmerman in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin took place on July 13, 2013. Reaction to the acquittal led to the birth of what is now known as the Black Lives Matter movement. Chauncey Alcorn, writing in Mic, recalls the movement’s origins: Criminal justice reform advocate Patrisse Cullors sat at the edge of her bed in a Susanville, California, motel room,…

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Demonstrators prepare to march to protest the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the killing of Florida teen Trayvon Martin, July 17, 2013 in Beverly Hills, California.

We Founded Black Lives Matter 5 Years Ago Today. We’re Still Going.

By Editors' Choice

By Patrisse Cullors, HuffPost — Right after the acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s killer in July 2013, Alicia Garza, Opal Tometi and I were devastated. We’d been following the proceedings closely. We’d watched the media criminalize 17-year-old Trayvon and humiliate his family to justify his cold-blooded murder presumably because his assailant was white-presenting. Still, we were sucker-punched by the acquittal. We stood perplexed; hadn’t we elected our first black president? Yet it was clear;…

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Patrisse Cullors, a co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement

Why feminism and racism have a lot to do with the gun debate

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Emma Lacey-Bordeaux — (CNN) — Students around the country are again taking to the streets. It’s the latest mass action since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that claimed seventeen lives and galvanized young people to act in the long-stalled debate over guns. Some activists are heartened by the attention being paid to the issue but they raise questions about how these students get viewed versus the treatment of…

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Patrisse Cullors and Tarana Burke - How #BlackLivesMatter and #MeToo Went From Hashtags to Movements

Patrisse Cullors and Tarana Burke: Anger, Activism, and Action

By Editors' Choice, Video/Audio

By ELLE — The Founders of Black Lives Matter and the #MeToo Movement on Making Change. Patrisse Cullors and Tarana Burke are recognizable, but their work is perhaps even more so. #BlackLivesMatter and #MeToo became the shorthand for the agitation and labor these activists lent to their causes, and the hashtags spread the word about police violence against black people and sexual harassment, respectively.

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Co-founder of Black Lives Matter, Patrisse Cullors

Co-Founder of Black Lives Matter Talks Misconceptions and Plans for 2018

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Kandia Johnson — As co-founder of Black Lives Matter, Patrisse Cullors is a modern-day revolutionary igniting change and turning messages into movements about law enforcement accountability and race in America. But beyond activist and co-founder of BLM, she’s a Fulbright Scholar, performance artist, an author of When they Call You A Terrorist, an instant New York Times Best Seller. Four years after the start of the movement, we caught up with Cullors to clear up BLM misconceptions and plans…

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Huey P. Newton, national defense minister of the Black Panther Party, raises his clenched fist behind the podium as he speaks at a convention sponsored by the Black Panthers at Temple University’s McGonigle Hall in Philadelphia, Pa., Saturday, Sept. 5, 1970. He is surrounded by security guards of the movement. The audience gathered is estimated at 6,000 with another thousand outside the crowded hall.

Patrisse Cullors says politicians labeled ‘Black Lives Matter’ a terrorist group- and it’s what always happens to black activists

By News & Current Affairs

By Natasha S. Alford, theGrio — Patrisse Khan-Cullors says she co-founded the “Black Lives Matter” movement out of love. But in a country plagued by longtime tension between law enforcement officers and communities of color, the killing of unarmed black civilians, and murders of police officers by radical individuals, her intent would eventually get distorted. “Black folks have always been considered terrorists in this country,” says Khan-Cullors in an exclusive interview…

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Patrisse Khan-Cullors

‘I grew up in a war zone’: Black Lives Matter’s Patrisse Khan-Cullors on racism in America

By News & Current Affairs

By Elena Sheppard, Yahoo Lifestyle — It was a lifetime of oppression and violence that led activist Patrisse Khan-Cullors to cofound the Black Lives Matter movement, but the catalyst was one particular instant: The moment when George Zimmerman was acquitted in the killing of Trayvon Martin. Scouring Facebook after the decision was announced, Khan-Cullors came upon a post by her friend Alicia Garza (who went on to cofound the movement…

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