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Slavery Archives - Page 27 of 36 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Senegalese women walk past a monument to slavery near the Slave house on Goree island 3km off Dakar, Senegal

UN’s Day of Abolition of Slave Trade Comes Amid Ominous Times

By Reparations

The Transatlantic slave trade is regarded by Pan-Africanists as the Maafa, a Swahili term meaning “great disaster.” By teleSur — Thursday marks the 20th anniversary of the International Day of Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition as decreed by the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization, or Unesco. Its purpose is to pay homage to those who were enslaved for hundreds of years as part of European colonization…

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How Slavery Inspired Modern Business Management

How Slavery Inspired Modern Business Management

By Editors' Choice

By “dangling the carrot” to improve worker productivity, businesses are taking a page from slavery’s playbook. By Caitlin C. Rosenthal, Boston Review — In 1911 a congressional special committee convened to investigate the impact of new business practices on the lives of workers. Of particular interest to the committee was something called scientific management, a technique that sought to measure and improve worker productivity. The system’s most vocal proponent, a…

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In the main image, Congressmen Robert B. Elliott of South Carolina delivers a speech on civil rights to the House of Representatives. January 6, 1874.

The Other ’68: Black Power During Reconstruction

By Editors' Choice

Recalling a time when the empowerment of the most oppressed in our society paved the way for other social struggles also gives weight to today’s slogan that all lives will matter only when Black lives matter By Adam Sanchez, Zinn Education Project  — From the urban rebellions to the salute at the Olympics, commemorations of 1968 — a pivotal year of Black Power — have appeared in news headlines throughout this anniversary year. Yet…

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Callie House

Callie House, Reparations Advocate and Trailblazer

By Editors' Choice, Reparations, Video/Audio

This episode delves into the extraordinary life of reparations advocate Callie House. Despite her status as a former slave, a woman, and a widower with five children, Callie House defied societal conventions and led the National Ex-Slave Mutual Relief, Bounty and Pension Association, one of the largest grassroots movements in African American history. House tirelessly traveled the country organizing newly freed African Americans in the quest to right the wrongs…

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Slavery Routes: For All the Gold in the World

By Reparations, Video/Audio

To expand their wealth, the Portuguese set up the slave trade, in which Africa was the centre. Filmmakers: Daniel Cattier, Juan Gelas and Fanny Glissant — At the end of the Middle Ages, Europe opened up to the world and discovered that it was at the margins of the world’s main area for wealth generation: Africa. Portuguese explorers were the first to set out to conquer Africa’s gold. When explorers…

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A drawing of one of the burials discovered at the site of the James Reese Career and Technical Center in Sugar Land, Tex.

Documenting ‘Slavery by Another Name’ in Texas

By News & Current Affairs

A drawing of one of the burials discovered at the site of the James Reese Career and Technical Center in Sugar Land, Tex. An African-American burial ground recently unearthed in Texas reveals details about an ugly chapter in the history of the American South. By The New York Times Editorial Board — Americans who grew up with the fiction that slavery was confined to the South — and that the North…

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Sir Hilary Beckles

Emancipation Day Message by Chairman, CARICOM Reparations Committee

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

By Professor Sir Hilary Beckles — Emancipation Day Message We join annually with communities across the world in marking the moment in which the crime of chattel enslavement was confronted and uprooted from our existential realities. For us, the moment is August 1st; other dates are determined elsewhere and officially recognized. Marking the moment in a celebratory fashion remains necessary despite the despicable nature of the gesture of Emancipation, legislated…

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Left to right: Radical Republican Thaddeus Stevens; an African-American soldier in the Union Army; abolitionist Frederick Douglass

The Urgency of a Third Reconstruction

By Editors' Choice

The ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment marked a turning point in U.S. history. Yet 150 years later, its promises remain unfulfilled. By Robert Greene, Dissent — The ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment on July 9, 1868 was a turning point in United States history. Arriving at the height of Reconstruction, the amendment marked the first time the U.S. Constitution explicitly addressed the question of who qualified as an American citizen.…

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William Lloyd’s Coffee House in London specialized in being the first in getting marine news, such as arrivals and shipwrecks. Merchants and traders profited from the transatlantic slave trade before abolition, not only in the buying and selling of slaves, but also in the whole marine business of ship insurance and mortgages to sea captains.

The Surprisingly Long History of Racial Oppression in Coffeehouses

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

Centuries before two Black men were arrested at a Philadelphia Starbucks, capitalists met at coffee shops to profit from the transatlantic slave trade. By Tasha Williams, Yes Magazine — An 18th-century ad tells us that a dozen or so men, women, and children of African heritage were scheduled for buyer’s inspection one Saturday, just outside the entrance of the London Coffee House in Philadelphia. The Stamp Act protests and other famous anti-British…

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Black child holding coins - Serede Jami / Eyeem / Getty Images

Black Americans’ Median Wealth Could Disappear in One Generation

By Editors' Choice

By Adam Hudson, Truthout — It’s no secret that, as the saying goes, “The rent is too damn high.”Across the nation, housing is becoming increasingly expensive for many Americans. But the story of the present-day housing crisis is not just a story of rising rents; it’s also a story of systemic racism. Today’s rising housing prices exacerbate the racial wealth gap in the US by making it more difficult for Black…

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