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Georgia

Stacey Abrams is running in Georgia to become America’s first black female governor.

In Georgia governor’s race can a black woman make history?

By Editors' Choice

Progressive Democrat Stacey Abrams is taking on Trump-style Republican Brian Kemp in a state where all 82 of its governors have been white men. By David Smith, The Guardian — In “Sweet Auburn”, a short walk from the birthplace and stone tomb of Martin Luther King Jr, salon owner Terrica Jones is silking hair with a ceramic iron and contemplating an opportunity that once seemed unthinkable: to vote for a black woman…

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The Democrat Stacey Abrams is vying to be the first African American woman governor in U.S. history.

The Democratic Party Apologizes to Black Voters

By News & Current Affairs

The DNC’s bid to energize African American turnout this fall began with these words from Chairman Tom Perez in Atlanta: “I am sorry.” By Russell Berman, The Atlantic — ATLANTA—Swanky fund-raisers don’t often begin with an apology to the well-heeled donors who shelled out thousands of dollars to sip wine, eat steak, and listen to pep-rally speeches. But as he looked out over a predominantly black crowd gathered at the Georgia…

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Stacey Abrams

Stacey Abrams’ Georgia Primary Victory Is the Latest Win for Black Political Organizing

By Editors' Choice

A large network of political groups and outreach initiatives, many of them helmed by black women, backed Abrams in Georgia’s May 22 democratic primary. By P.R. Lockhart, VOX — On Tuesday night, Georgians voting in the state Democratic primary overwhelmingly backed Stacey Abrams, bringing the 44-year-old former Georgia House minority leader one step closer to becoming the first woman governor of Georgia and the first black woman governor in the US.…

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Eluard Luchell McDaniels, Spanish Civil. War Volunteer, Batea, Spain, May 1938. Image Courtesy of the Tamiment Library, New York University

African American Anti-Fascists in the Spanish Civil War

By Editors' Choice

Anti-fascist volunteer Canute Frankson explained his motivation in a letter home in 1937: “We will build us a new society—a society of peace and plenty. There will be no color line, no jim crow trains, no lynching. That is why, my dear, I’m here in Spain.” By Peter Carroll, BlackPast.org — Approximately 90 African Americans fought in Spain during the civil war that engulfed that nation between 1936 and 1939.…

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At the recent Power Rising Summit in Atlanta, U.S. Reps. Stacey Plaskett of the Virgin Islands, Terri Sewell of Alabama, Bonnie Watson Coleman of New Jersey, Robin Kelly of Illinois and Yvette Clarke of New York were among the nearly 1,000 Black women who gathered to strategize on how to build their political power.

A Watershed Year for Black Women’s Political Power in the South

By News & Current Affairs

The recent Power Rising Summit in Atlanta brought together nearly a thousand Black women from across the country to strategize on how to build political power and harness the momentum behind the surge of Black women running for office. By Rebekah Barber, Facing South — From the onset of the women’s suffrage movement, Black women were among the strongest advocates for universal suffrage. Years before Black feminist scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw coined…

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Stone Mountain

Is Stone Mountain Memorial a Gigantic Tribute to White Supremacy?

By Commentaries/Opinions

Some see the monument as “the largest shrine to white supremacy in the history of the world.” By Debra McKinney, Southern Poverty Law Center — From its north side, Stone Mountain is a formidable sight. Staggeringly steep, nearly five times as high as Niagara Falls, it rises from Georgia’s wooded landscape like a rogue wave. This anomalous, igneous dome east of Atlanta is the centerpiece of a state park that draws 4 million visitors a year. Forty stories above ground, front and center on the gunmetal-gray face of the stone, is the largest bas-relief carving on the planet, a Civil War memorial to Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. These leaders of the Southern rebellion against the United States sit astride their steeds, hats over their hearts, on a three-acre backdrop etched into the mountainside.

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