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Inequality Archives - Page 2 of 6 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Will the Coronavirus Hit Black Folks Harder?

By COVID-19 (Coronavirus), Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Dr. Julianne Malveaux — Restaurants, museums, libraries, gyms, and bars are closed.  So are schools, from K-12 to higher education. Classes will be conducted online or not at all.  A local vendor told me her receipts were down by 85 percent, and she hopes not to close before the “national emergency” is over. Our streets are deserted, with some cities asking people to “self-quarantine”, or in the words of several…

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Donald Trump and Mitch McConnell

Will Trump and Mitch Really Show Workers and the Poor the COVID Money?

By Commentaries/Opinions, COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson — At a news conference, Trump went on record saying, “that would be OK with me.” What is “OK” with him is that the one to two trillion dollars in COVID-19 combat stimulus dollars won’t simply fatten the pockets of the banks and big business. He made the promise for a reason. The moment Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said they’d fast track the…

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A driver for multiple ride-share companies with several devices on at once in New York, June 7, 2018.

How the Coronavirus Is Exposing Inequality Among America’s Workers

By COVID-19 (Coronavirus), News & Current Affairs

The spread of the coronavirus exposes a widening chasm in the U.S. economy between college-educated workers and less-educated workers. By Alana Semuels, Time — There are many things that worry Fina Kao about working in a busy donut shop in an age of fear about a spreading virus. The elderly customer who shuffles across the brown linoleum floor of the shop, orders a glazed donut, and then coughs. The parents sitting at…

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Fast food workers and union members carry signs as they stage a protest outside of a McDonald's restaurant in Oakland, Calif., on Feb. 12, 2018, the 50th anniversary of the historic Memphis Sanitation Strike that was led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

What Happened to Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream of Economic Justice?

By Commentaries/Opinions

Economic justice was always central to Martin Luther King Jr.’s agenda. But society has moved backward on that issue since his death. By Michael K. Honey, Time — When Memphis sanitation workers went on strike in 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. knew they had a lesson to teach America. “You are reminding the nation,” he told attendees at a March 1968 rally there, “that it is a crime for people to live…

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Man holding American flag

Reparations: One Necessary Step Toward Black Freedom

By Reparations

By Darrel Thompson, CLASP — Reparations for descendants of enslaved Black people have been discussed on and off at least since the end of the Civil War. But the conversation has been reignited by an inflamed racist political climate, drawing renewed focus to the nation’s racist past. Last spring, students at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. voted to create a fund benefitting descendants of enslaved Black people sold by the university; all…

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Booker T Washington

Bookerism and the Black Elite

By Editors' Choice

Managing race relations from above. By Adolph Reed Jr., The New Republic — On September 18, 1895, Booker T. Washington gave his famous address to the Atlanta Cotton States and International Exposition. Washington declared before this regional business gathering his acquiescence in the name of the black Southern population to the new regime of almost total black disfranchisement and the abrogation of civil rights within a social, political, and economic…

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Prospective students tour Georgetown University's campus in Washington., DC.

American Schools with Historical Ties to Slavery Consider Reparations

By Reparations

The Associated Press — American colleges and universities are increasingly discussing the idea of reparations linked to their historical ties to slavery. Until now, schools have created monuments, changed building names and issued public apologies – instead of providing money. But Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. and two other colleges recently announced financial commitments to people whose ancestors were slaves. The year 2019 marks the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first slave, in…

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‘Suggesting that whiteness has no meaning creates an alienating – even hostile – climate for people of color working and living in predominantly white environments.’

White people assume niceness is the answer to racial inequality. But it’s not.

By Commentaries/Opinions

While most of us see ourselves as ‘not racist’, we continue to reproduce racist outcomes and live segregated lives. By Robin diAngelo, The Guardian — I am white. As an academic, consultant and writer on white racial identity and race relations, I speak daily with other white people about the meaning of race in our lives. These conversations are critical because, by virtually every measure, racial inequality persists, and institutions…

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Former Vice President Joe Biden

Biden’s Words on Racial Equality Ring Hollow

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Zachary R. Wood, The Washington Informer  — “I think the Democratic Party could stand a liberal George Wallace — someone who’s not afraid to stand up and offend people, someone who wouldn’t pander, but would say what the American people know in their gut is right.” Former Vice President Joe Biden uttered these words in an interview with the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1975. But before we proceed, I have…

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The Rich Can’t Get Richer Forever, Can They?

The Rich Can’t Get Richer Forever, Can They?

By Commentaries/Opinions

Inequality comes in waves. The question is when this one will break. By Liaquat Ahamed, The New Yorker —  In 1831, Alexis de Tocqueville, at the age of twenty-five, was sent by France’s Ministry of Justice to study the American penal system. He spent ten months in the United States, dutifully visiting prisons and meeting hundreds of people, including President Andrew Jackson and his predecessor, John Quincy Adams. On his…

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