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Racial Inequality Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

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America’s History of Inequality — And What Still Needs to Change Today

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Ginger Abbott — It’s no secret that there is a history of inequality in America. But that history has created modern inequality in America, too. Unfortunately, foundations of racism, sexism and a dividing class structure all play a role in our current society, and as citizens, it is our job to dismantle those systems in order to work towards a more equal society. Especially for those in positions of…

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We Are A Hated People

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Haki R. Madhubuti— before george floyd, breonna taylor and millions of Black “others” was emmett till. i, a yellow-black boy of 13 was slapped into our Black reality upon reading and selling out of my jet magazines of 9/15/55 that horrified a world with the images of the teenager emmett till who had been crucified by white supremacist christian cowards in money, mississippi. his slaughter was not just a…

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Campaigners slam UK government report into racial disparities as a ‘whitewash’

By News & Current Affairs

By Tara John, CNN — London (CNN)A highly anticipated report from a commission set up by the UK government to look into racial disparities in the country has been described as a “whitewash” by campaigners after it stated that there is no evidence that the UK is institutionally racist. A short summary of the report, commissioned in the wake of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests last summer, was shared to the…

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The Transatlantic Slave Trade: A Day of Remembrance

By Reparations

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent — NNPA NEWSWIRE — “It is important to recognize the International Decade for People of African Descent as an international corrective to combat the systematic indoctrination of the lie of African inferiority,” said Dr. Kevin Cokley, the director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis. “Passing H.R. 40 would count as the most significant legislative achievement to impact the…

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An Overdue Debt — Why It’s Finally Time To Pay Reparations To Black Americans

Revisiting reparations: Is it time for the US to pay its debt for the legacy of slavery?

By Reparations

By Anne C. Bailey — Some 156 years after the end of the Civil War and the official abolition of slavery through the 13th Amendment, the idea of reparations is gaining currency in Washington. On March 1, Cedric Richmond, a senior adviser to President Joe Biden, suggested the White House could “start acting now” on the issue. The comment comes just weeks after a House committee chaired by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee,…

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Our System Is Rigged so the Minority Can Rule

By Editors' Choice

The Electoral College, Republican gerrymandering and the filibuster are all examples of how American democracy is at risk. By Jesse Jackson— The majority does not rule in the United States. The foundation of any democracy — one person, one vote — is mocked by institutionalized impediments that allow the minority to win even when they lose at the ballot box. In this era, even when Democrats win, they lose. And…

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People march towards the Washington Monument at the Black Lives Matter protest in Washington DC 6/6/2020

‘Racism is in the bones of our nation’: Will Joe Biden answer ‘cry’ for racial justice?

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Chris McGreall— In his first few minutes as America’s new president, Joe Biden made a promise so sweeping that it almost seemed to deny history. “We can deliver racial justice,” Biden pledged to his factious nation. It wasn’t a commitment presented in any detail as he moved on to asserting that America would again be the leading force for good in the world, a claim that draws its own…

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While the G.I. Bill and other post-World War II policies helped to build a strong middle class, many of those benefits were not extended to black families—just one factor that led to the racial wealth gap seen today. (Photo: @LadyLSpeaks/Twitter)

1619, 1776, and Family Separation: How We Move Child Welfare Forward with Equity

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Dr. Sharon McDaniel— Dear President Biden and Vice President Harris, During the campaign, I saw your signs touting the phrase, “Our best days still lie ahead.” But what do “best days” look like for our children and families? As CEO of a nationally recognized kinship care service agency, a Black mother and a former child of the foster care system, I can say issues of racism remain problematic in child welfare services. I’ve dealt with the…

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What Reparations for Slavery Might Look Like in 2019

A program about reparations and why now?

By Reparations

By Patricia Yosha— Race Matters. At the beginning of 2020, the Social Justice Committee of the First Unitarian Universalist Society of Exeter (FUUSE) sponsored two community discussions on racial issues and local racial history. Shortly after, the coronavirus pandemic took over, destroying lives inequitably among Black and brown people. Adding to that pain, police killings of Black people inspired demonstrations of racial reckoning all over the country. As we look…

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2020 was the year America embraced Black Lives Matter as a movement, not just a moment

By Editors' Choice

By Erika D. Smith — George Floyd. Breonna Taylor. Andres Guardado. For months this summer, these Black and brown faces looked out on us from the boarded-up windows of businesses in Venice, spray-painted on plywood and awaiting riots that never came. Every day, they reminded us — as if we could forget — of the trauma that police brutality inflicted upon our nation this year. That these images of the dead are…

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Racial Tensions in the U.S. Are Helping to Fuel a Rise in Black Gun Ownership

By Editors' Choice

By: Melissa Chan — Luther Thompson never thought he’d be a gun owner. But in April, the 41-year-old obtained a concealed carry license and bought his first firearm—a $400 Smith & Wesson pistol—after feeling, for the first time, that he was not safe raising a family in the South as a Black man. “Down here, it’s totally different,” he says. “They’re bold with their racism.” The purchase came two months…

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