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Economic Inequality Archives - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Civil rights advocates carry placards during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in Washington

Truth and Reconciliation: Addressing Systematic Racism in the United States

By Commentaries/Opinions, Editors' Choice

By Danyelle Solomon — 2019 marks the 400th anniversary of Africans sold into bondage arriving on Virginia’s shores. It has been 156 years since the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, 55 years since the end of Jim Crow, and 51 years since the civil rights movement. All of these moments in U.S. history represent crossroads—moments where the country made a choice or where people demanded that the words on the pages of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights became more than words; that policies and practices were equitably distributed among all people, not just a select few…

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Jeffrey S. Lowe, PhD

Overview of the Crisis of Gentrification in Black America

By Gentrification

Presentation by Jeffrey S. Lowe, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Urban Planning and Environmental Policy, Texas Southern University for the Institute of the Black World 21st Century (IBW). National Emergency Summit on Gentrification Newark, New Jersey, April 4, 2019 Any overview concerned with gentrification that is causing crisis in Black America must begin with defining the process in a meaningful way and contextualizing the situation to particular times and sets…

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Commentary, Articles and Essays by Dr. Julianne Malveaux

Poverty and the Fallacy of Long-Term Economic Greatness

By Dr. Julianne Malveaux

By Julianne Malveaux — The first week of July produced a somewhat positive Employment Situation report. While the unemployment rate ticked up just a bit, about 224,000 new jobs were created, nearly three times as many as were created in the tepid previous month. There was, of course, the Administration crowing about the strength of the economy, and with wage growth on the rise, an impassioned outsider might agree that…

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Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee, 1968

The Language of the Unheard: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Social Democracy

By Editors' Choice, Reparations

By Robert Greene II, The Nation — Gone was the optimism of 1963. It had been replaced by a sense of disillusionment, a sense of urgency that America was about to lose the last chance to have its soul.” This was how Jet magazine described the climax of the Poor People’s Campaign, which reached Washington, DC, in the tumultuous summer of 1968. For Jet and for many early civil-rights activists, the Poor People’s Campaign…

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Minority Cannabis Business Association

MCBA Releases Model Municipal Social Equity Ordinance for Nationwide Adoption

By Editors' Choice

Portland OR, March 11th – Members of the Minority Cannabis Business Association (MCBA) unveiled their latest model policy recommendation to lawmakers and cannabis regulators, this time releasing a Model Municipal Social Equity Ordinance to be adopted by local governments throughout the country. The Model Ordinance was drafted by a team of attorneys and drug policy reform advocates from MCBA, the National Cannabis Industry Association (NCIA) and the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA)…

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Buy Black and Bank Black: Movement in the US Gains International Attention

By Video/Audio

Atlanta, GA — The “Buy Black” movement draws the attention of a French news outlet. In this video you’ll hear from Killer Mike (Rapper, Activist), Dr. Boyce Watkins (Author, Economist), and Sharif Abdul Malik (Founder, WeBuyBlack) who withdraws money from Bank of America to deposit into a Black owned bank. This video was originally posted on France24.com, September 27, 2016 Also See:  Newark As Model City National Town Hall…

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Martin Luther King Jr. delivers his famed "I Have Dream" speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, August 28, 1963.

600 Black Legislators Resolved to Push Policies for Economic Justice

By News & Current Affairs

On King Holiday Commemoration: 600 Black Legislators Resolved to Push Policies for Economic Justice. Resolution considered new win for Black Wealth 2020 By Hazel Trice Edney — It was three years ago that a group of national business leaders launched a movement called Black Wealth 2020 partially based on the economic vision articulated by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. King said in his final speech on April 3, 1968: “It’s…

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You Can't Have Capitalism Without Racism - Malcom X.

The American Economy Is Rigged — And what we can do about it.

By Editors' Choice

NOTE: No mention of the centrality of racism and sexism the plays in “rigged” capitalism. I put rigged in quotes because it’s redundant to call capitalism rigged! Capitalism has always been rigged against the vast majority of the people: those exterminated or enslaved by capitalism’s founders and those who eventually became the proletariat all over the world. Hence, this essay is fundamentally flawed in its attempt to explain why their…

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Nobody would mistake Cory Booker for a radical.

Cory Booker’s Big New Policy Idea Isn’t Reparations, but It’s the Closest a Presidential Candidate Is Going to Get

By News & Current Affairs

By Jordan Weissmann — Sen. Cory Booker did not come out and propose reparations for black Americans this week. But the policy idea he rolled out on Monday might be the closest thing that we can expect to see from a serious presidential contender going into 2020. The senator from New Jersey, who is gearing up for a White House run, plans to introduce legislation soon that would create a “baby bond”…

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Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke was found guilty of 2nd-degree murder and 16 counts of aggravated battery.

‘This Is Historic’: Why the Van Dyke Guilty Verdict Is a Victory For the Movement For Black Lives

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Miles Kampf-Lassin, In These Times — “We are far from done. This is the beginning and we should use this momentum to keep going forward.” Chicago has long been a city on the brink. Decades of racial stratification, disinvestment, segregation and endemic poverty have left large swaths of the population struggling to survive, while new development has disproportionately favored wealthier residents. The communities left behind by this process are…

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