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UK Archives - Page 2 of 3 - Institute of the Black World 21st Century

Imperial Federation Map of the World showing the extent of the British Empire. The Empire in red in 1886, by Walter Crane

British Empire is still being whitewashed by the school curriculum – historian on why this must change

By Editors' Choice

By Deana Heath, The Conversation — Jeremy Corbyn has recently proposed that British school children should be taught about the history of the realities of British imperialism and colonialism. This would include the history of people of colour as components of, and contributors to, the British nation-state – rather than simply as enslaved victims of it. As Corbyn rightly noted: “Black history is British history” – and hence its study should be…

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Slavery

London University Calls for £100m Slavery Reparation

By Reparations

Universities in the UK which benefited in previous centuries from the slave trade should contribute to a £100m fund to support ethnic minority students, says a university leader. By Sean Coughlan, BBC News — Geoff Thompson, chair of governors of the University of East London, says it would be “ethical and right” for universities to contribute. He says it would help young people who otherwise could not afford to graduate. Last…

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UK Minister Continues to Ignore the Crimes of Slavery

By Reparations

A joint statement from the CARICOM Reparations Commission (CRC) and the Centre for Reparation Research (CRR) — In a recent column published in the Jamaica Observer newspaper, UK Minister Lord Tariq Ahmad, said it was his honour, as minister of state for the Caribbean and the Commonwealth, “to join in celebrating the achievements of the Windrush generation, the role they play in UK-Caribbean relations and in making our country the…

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Young woman at a student protest in London against fees and cuts in 2010

The Black Studies Movement in Britain

By News & Current Affairs

By Kehinde Andrews, Black Perspectives — In 1967, the Afro-Caribbean Self-Help Organisation (ACSHO), based in Birmingham, started one of the first Black supplementary schools in the UK, sparking off a movement that transformed how mainstream schools treated their Black children. Supplementary schools refer to voluntary education programs run by concerned parents, teachers, and community members because of the racism faced in the school system.

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Jamaican immigrants aboard the "Empire Windrush" in 1948.

The Caribbean Immigrants Who Transformed Britain

By Commentaries/Opinions

By Kaila Philo, The New Republic — Seventy years ago today—June 22, 1948—a passenger ship carrying 492 Jamaican immigrants arrived in Essex, London. The Empire Windrush was the first of many ships to come, as the British government recruited migrants from the Caribbean Commonwealth to help rebuild the economy after World War II. These arrivals came to be known as the Windrush generation. “It is unclear how many people belong to the Windrush generation,…

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Beckles to make case for Windrush generation in London

By News & Current Affairs, Reparations

BECKLES… to visit London, United Kingdom, this week to participate in discussions concerning the Windrush generation By The Jamaica Observer — Vice-Chancellor of The University of the West Indies (The UWI), Professor Sir Hilary Beckles, is expected to visit London, United Kingdom, this week on a special invitation from the British Library to participate in discussions on the ongoing cases concerning the Windrush generation. A release said yesterday that on…

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It's racism... The Windrush Generation has been treated abysmally by this government and it needs to stop," said protester Ros Griffiths.

‘It’s Racism’: Protest Supports UK’s Windrush Generation

By News & Current Affairs

The British government destroyed thousands of arrival cards in 2010, sparking widespread outrage among the affected Caribbean immigrants. “It’s racism… The Windrush Generation has been treated abysmally by this government and it needs to stop,” protester Ros Griffiths told teleSUR. “The issues are relating to the policies that have made it very hostile for immigrants and even when they arrived – some in the late 40s, some in the 50s and in the 60s, when my parents got…

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Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and Prime Minister of Jamaica Andrew Holness speak during a bilateral meeting at 10 Downing Street, London, Tuesday April 17, 2018

UK leader sorry for Caribbean citizens immigration mix-up

By News & Current Affairs

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Theresa May made a personal apology Tuesday for the treatment of long-term U.K. residents from the Caribbean who have been asked to prove their right to stay in the country or face deportation. The plight of legal residents wrongly identified as living in Britain illegally has erupted as the country hosts leaders from the 53-nation Commonwealth of the U.K. and its former colonies. May…

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When will Britain face up to its crimes against humanity?

When will Britain face up to its crimes against humanity?

By Commentaries/Opinions, Reparations

After the abolition of slavery, Britain paid millions in compensation – but every penny of it went to slave owners, and nothing to those they enslaved. We must stop overlooking the brutality of British history. By Kris Manjapra, The Guardian — On 3 August 1835, somewhere in the City of London, two of Europe’s most famous bankers came to an agreement with the chancellor of the exchequer. Two years earlier,…

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The Jamaican Parishes of St Thomas and St Mary Paid a Heavy Price for Freedom

By Reparations

By Prof. Verene Shepherd (Centre for Reparation Research) and Ahmed Reid (City University of New York) — In a New York Times article by Stephen Castle of December 27, 2014, ironically the anniversary of the outbreak of the war led by Samuel Sharpe that hastened legislative Emancipation by the British, we learned that after a financial crash in 1720, called the South Sea Bubble, the British government was forced to undertake…

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